Neal Heaton

Neal Heaton (born March 3, 1960) is a former Major League Baseball left-handed pitcher who played for the Cleveland Indians, Minnesota Twins, Montreal Expos, Pittsburgh Pirates, Kansas City Royals, Milwaukee Brewers, and New York Yankees from 1982 to 1993.

Heaton was drafted by the Indians in the 2nd round of the 1981 amateur draft from the University of Miami. He was selected to the National League All-Star team in 1990 with the Pirates. On March 10, 1992, the Pirates traded Heaton to the Kansas City Royals for Kirk Gibson. In his 12-season career, he posted an 80-96 record with 699 strikeouts and a 4.37 ERA in 1507.0 innings pitched.

Neal Heaton
Pitcher
Born: March 3, 1960 (age 59)
Jamaica, New York
Batted: Left Threw: Left
MLB debut
September 3, 1982, for the Cleveland Indians
Last MLB appearance
June 26, 1993, for the New York Yankees
MLB statistics
Win–loss record80–96
Earned run average4.37
Strikeouts699
Teams
Career highlights and awards

External links

1980 College Baseball All-America Team

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each team position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete together as a unit, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. Walter Camp selected the first All-America team in the early days of American football in 1889.From 1947 to 1980, the American Baseball Coaches Association was the only All-American selector recognized by the NCAA.

1981 College Baseball All-America Team

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each team position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete together as a unit, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. Walter Camp selected the first All-America team in the early days of American football in 1889.The NCAA recognizes two different All-America selectors for the 1981 college baseball season: the American Baseball Coaches Association (since 1947) and Baseball America (since 1981).

1986 Minnesota Twins season

The 1986 Minnesota Twins finished at 71-91, sixth in the AL West, 21 games behind the eventual AL runner-up California Angels. 1,255,453 fans attended Twins games, the second lowest total in the American League. Pitcher Bert Blyleven made a prediction on Fan Appreciation Day on October 3, saying that if the team came together as a unit and signed some other good players, they could potentially bring a World Series championship to Minnesota. That prediction proved accurate the next year.

1987 Montreal Expos season

The 1987 Montreal Expos season was the 19th season in franchise history.

1988 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1988 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in Major League Baseball. The Phillies finished sixth in the National League East with a record of 65 wins and 96 losses.

1990 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1990 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 61st playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 10, 1990, at Wrigley Field in Chicago, the home of the Chicago Cubs of the National League. The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 2-0. The game is remembered for a rain delay in the 7th inning that resulted in CBS airing Rescue 911 during the delay. This is also the first game – and so far the only one – to feature two players bearing the same name: Greg Olson. One was a pitcher, represented the AL squad and Baltimore Orioles and featured three G's in the first name and the other was a catcher, represented the NL squad and Atlanta Braves and featured only two G's in the first name. Outfielder Jose Canseco of the Oakland Athletics and First Baseman Will Clark of the San Francisco Giants were the leaders of their leagues in the fan votes. They both batted third in the line up for their squads.

The pregame ceremonies celebrated the 85th anniversary of the Great Lakes Naval Training Station which, as with previous All-Star Games held in Chicago, provided the colors presentation. After Wayne Messmer sang O Canada, recording artist (and native Chicagoan) Richard Marx sang The Star-Spangled Banner. The last All-Star Game previously held at Wrigley Field was represented by Ernie Banks who threw out the ceremonial first pitch.

1990 Pittsburgh Pirates season

The 1990 Pittsburgh Pirates season was their 109th season; the 104th in the National League. This was their 21st season at Three Rivers Stadium. The Pirates finished first in the National League East with a record of 95–67. They were defeated four games to two by the Cincinnati Reds in the 1990 National League Championship Series.

1992 Kansas City Royals season

The 1992 Kansas City Royals season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Royals finishing 5th in the American League West with a record of 72 wins and 90 losses.

1992 Milwaukee Brewers season

The 1992 Milwaukee Brewers season featured the team finishing in second place in the American League East with a record of 92 wins and 70 losses.

1999 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 1999 followed the system in use since 1995. The Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from recent major league players and elected three: George Brett, Nolan Ryan, and Robin Yount. The Veterans Committee met in closed sessions and selected four people from multiple classified ballots: Orlando Cepeda, Nestor Chylak, Frank Selee, and Joe Williams.

Brett, Ryan, and Yount—the BBWAA class of 1999—were all newly eligible, as they all played their last games in 1993. It was the first time the writers elected more than two first-ballot candidates since the inaugural class of 1936 (five).

Induction ceremonies in Cooperstown, New York, were held July 25 with George Grande as emcee.

Jeff Reed (baseball)

Jeffrey Scott Reed (born November 12, 1962) is a former Major League Baseball catcher who played for the Minnesota Twins (1984–1986), Montreal Expos (1987–1988), Cincinnati Reds (1988–1992), San Francisco Giants (1993–1995), Colorado Rockies (1996–1998) and Chicago Cubs (1999–2000). He batted left-handed and threw right-handed. He is currently a coach with the Elizabethton Twins.

Reed was the Twins' first-round pick (and 12th overall) in the 1980 amateur draft.

Despite playing for 17 seasons in the majors, he was usually relegated to a backup role. Reed rarely appeared in more than 100 games per year. He was widely regarded as a solid defensive catcher.

On February 3, 1987, Reed was traded from the Twins along with Neal Heaton, Yorkis Perez and Al Cardwood to the Expos for Jeff Reardon and Tom Nieto.

On September 16, 1988, Reed, filling in for an injured Bo Díaz, caught Tom Browning's perfect game in the Cincinnati Reds' 1-0 victory over the Los Angeles Dodgers at Riverfront Stadium. In his autobiography, Browning credited Reed as an integral part of the performance: "He did a phenomenal job, especially considering what was at stake in the later innings."

During the late innings of Browning's perfect game, Reed had to continually slow down his pitcher. According to Browning's book, Reds manager Pete Rose was worried that his pitcher was working too quickly, which could lead to an errant pitch. At one point in the game, Reed stood up and raised his arms, palms facing out, to signal Browning to slow down.

Despite his relative anonymity, Reed enjoyed a cult following in the city of Scranton, Pennsylvania throughout his career. A group of young baseball fans chose Reed as their alternative hero to more popular choices such as Don Mattingly or Ken Griffey Jr. The motto of the fan club: "We support the role playing Jeff Reed because in life, who among us is truly a superstar, and how many of us are the role players?" Reed remains hugely popular in Scranton to this day, almost twenty years after his professional career ended.

Sachem School District

Sachem Central School District is one of the largest school districts by population on Long Island and among all suburban school districts in New York, United States. Founded in 1955, the district now encompasses residents of the Census-Designated Places of Holbrook, Holtsville and Farmingville, as well as some parts of Lake Grove, Lake Ronkonkoma, Ronkonkoma, Nesconset, and Bohemia. As of 2011, its district office is located in Lake Ronkonkoma at Samoset Middle School.

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