Navy Strategic Command

The Navy Strategic Command (formerly the Navy Systems Command) is the command responsible for training, personnel, resources, engineering and capability development of the Royal Australian Navy. As such the Navy Strategic Command works with the Capability Acquisition and Sustainment Group, the Defence Science and Technology Group, and the Joint Capabilities Group to ensure the personal, materiel and logistical capabilities of the Royal Australian Navy.[1][2]

Navy Strategic Command
Country Australia
AllegianceAustralian Defence Force
Branch Royal Australian Navy
Garrison/HQCanberra, Australian Capital Territory

Role and structure

The role and responsibilities of the Navy Strategic Command is principally to provide logistical support services to the Fleet Command and the infrastructure and personnel of the Royal Australian Navy as a whole.[3][4]

Navy People, Training and Resources

The Head of Navy People, Training and Resources is dual held by the Deputy Chief of Navy with the rank of rear admiral and is responsible for the training and management of the personnel of the Royal Australian Navy.

Navy Engineering, Regulation, Certification and Safety

The Head of Navy Engineering, with the rank of rear admiral and Naval Flag Administrator, is responsible for the management, delivery and maintenance of seaworthy material, maritime engineering, oversight of the Fleet Support Unit, overseeing health and safety requirements, and setting material certification requirements and licensing policy. As such the Head of Navy Engineering works with the Joint Logistics Command.[5][6] The Head of Navy Engineering operates one of the most comprehensive engineering programs in Australia.[7]

Naval Technical Bureau

The Naval Technical Bureau is composed of uniform and civilian specialists across engineering and technological professions responsible for the delivery of seaworthy materiel.[8]

Maritime Safety Bureau

The Maritime Safety Bureau is responsible for the monitoring and defining policy for maritime safety and operational seaworthiness of the Royal Australian Navy.[9]

Navy Capability

The Head of Navy Capability, with the rank of rear admiral, is responsible for navy modernisation, investment, and force design bringing the alignment of capabilities of the three services together into a joint force. The Head of Navy Capability works with the Capability Acquisition and Sustainment Group.[10]

Sea Power Centre

The Sea Power Centre – Australia (SPC–A) was established in the early 1990s to act as an autonomous research centre in order to foster and encourage development of maritime strategic thought by providing intellectual rigour to the public debate on maritime strategy and other maritime issues.[11]

References

  1. ^ "Senior Leadership Group". Royal Australian Navy. Retrieved 7 August 2017.
  2. ^ "Organisation". Royal Australian Navy. Archived from the original on 15 September 2008. Retrieved 7 August 2017.
  3. ^ "Senior Leadership Group". Royal Australian Navy. Retrieved 7 August 2017.
  4. ^ "Organisation". Royal Australian Navy. Archived from the original on 15 September 2008. Retrieved 7 August 2017.
  5. ^ "Senior Leadership Group". Royal Australian Navy. Retrieved 7 August 2017.
  6. ^ "Organisation". Royal Australian Navy. Archived from the original on 15 September 2008. Retrieved 7 August 2017.
  7. ^ "Civilian Engineer Development Program Introduction". Royal Australian Navy. Retrieved 7 August 2017.
  8. ^ "Civilian Engineer Development Program Introduction". Royal Australian Navy. Retrieved 7 August 2017.
  9. ^ Eliza Bavin (29 November 2013). "Royal Australian Navy says goodbye to Captain Howard Furness". Royal Australian Navy. Retrieved 7 August 2017.
  10. ^ Robbin Laird (30 August 2016). "Rear Admiral Jonathan Mead focused on the way ahead for the Royal Australian Navy". Second Line of Defense. Retrieved 7 August 2017.
  11. ^ "Sea Power Centre – About". Royal Australian Navy. 30 August 2016. Retrieved 7 August 2017.
2010 Queen's Birthday Honours (Australia)

The Queen's Birthday Honours 2010 for Australia were announced on 13 June 2010.

† indicates an award given posthumously.

2015 Queen's Birthday Honours (Australia)

The Queen's Birthday Honours 2015 for Australia were announced on 8 June 2015 by the Governor-General, Sir Peter Cosgrove.The Birthday Honours were appointments by some of the 16 Commonwealth realms of Queen Elizabeth II to various orders and honours to reward and highlight good works by citizens of those countries. The Birthday Honours are awarded as part of the Queen's Official Birthday celebrations during the month of June.

2016 Queen's Birthday Honours (Australia)

The 2016 Queen's Birthday Honours for Australia were announced on 13 June 2016 by the Governor-General, Sir Peter Cosgrove.The Birthday Honours were appointments by some of the 16 Commonwealth realms of Queen Elizabeth II to various orders and honours to reward and highlight good works by citizens of those countries. The Birthday Honours are awarded as part of the Queen's Official Birthday celebrations during the month of June.

Australian Defence Force

The Australian Defence Force (ADF) is the military organisation responsible for the defence of Australia. It consists of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN), Australian Army, Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) and a number of 'tri-service' units. The ADF has a strength of just under 80,000 full-time personnel and active reservists, and is supported by the Department of Defence and several other civilian agencies.

During the first decades of the 20th century, the Australian Government established the armed services as separate organisations. Each service had an independent chain of command. In 1976, the government made a strategic change and established the ADF to place the services under a single headquarters. Over time, the degree of integration has increased and tri-service headquarters, logistics and training institutions have supplanted many single-service establishments.

The ADF is technologically sophisticated but relatively small. Although the ADF's 58,206 full-time active-duty personnel and 21,694 active reservists make it the largest military in Oceania, it is smaller than most Asian military forces. Nonetheless, the ADF is supported by a significant budget by worldwide standards and is able to deploy forces in multiple locations outside Australia.

Royal Australian Navy

The Royal Australian Navy (RAN) is the naval branch of the Australian Defence Force. Following the Federation of Australia in 1901, the ships and resources of the separate colonial navies were integrated into a national force, called the Commonwealth Naval Forces. Originally intended for local defence, the navy was granted the title of 'Royal Australian Navy' in 1911, and became increasingly responsible for defence of the region.

Britain's Royal Navy’s Australian Squadron was assigned to the Australia Station and provided support to the RAN. The Australian and New Zealand governments helped to fund the Australian Squadron until 1913, while the Admiralty committed itself to keeping the Squadron at a constant strength. The Australian Squadron ceased on 4 October 1913, when RAN ships entered Sydney Harbour for the first time.The Royal Navy continued to provide blue-water defence capability in the Pacific up to the early years of the Second World War. Then, rapid wartime expansion saw the acquisition of large surface vessels and the building of many smaller warships. In the decade following the war, the RAN acquired a small number of aircraft carriers, the last of which was decommissioned in 1982.

Today, the RAN consists of 48 commissioned vessels, 3 non-commissioned vessels and over 16,000 personnel. The navy is one of the largest and most sophisticated naval forces in the South Pacific region, with a significant presence in the Indian Ocean and worldwide operations in support of military campaigns and peacekeeping missions. The current Chief of Navy is Vice Admiral Michael Noonan.

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