National League East

The National League East is one of Major League Baseball's six divisions. The Atlanta Braves have the most National League East titles (13). Most of Atlanta's NL East titles came during a record stretch of reaching MLB playoffs 14 consecutive times (there were no playoffs in 1994 and the first three titles of that streak came when the Braves were in the National League West.)

The division was created when the National League (along with the American League) added two expansion teams and divided into two divisions, East and West effective for the 1969 season. The National League's geographical alignment was rather peculiar as its partitioning was really more north and south instead of east and west. Two teams in the Eastern Time Zone, the Atlanta Braves and the Cincinnati Reds, were in the same division as teams on the Pacific coast. This was due to the demands of the Chicago Cubs and St. Louis Cardinals, who refused to support expansion unless they were promised they would be kept together in the newly created East division.

During the two-division era, from 1969 to 1993, the Philadelphia Phillies and the Pittsburgh Pirates together owned more than half of the division titles, having won a combined 15 of 25 championships during that span.[1] They were also the only teams in the division to have won consecutive titles during that span.[2][3][4]

When the National League realigned into three divisions in 1994, the Pittsburgh Pirates were originally supposed to stay in the East while the Braves were to be moved to the newly created National League Central. However, the Braves, wanting to form a natural rivalry with the expansion Florida Marlins, elected to be placed in the East. Despite the Marlins offering to go to the Central, the Pirates instead gave up their spot in the East to the Braves.[5] Since then, the Pirates have tried several times unsuccessfully to be placed back in the East.[6]

NL East
LeagueNational League
SportMajor League Baseball
Founded1969
Teams
No. of teams5
Championships
Most recent NL East champion(s)Atlanta Braves
Most NL East titlesAtlanta Braves (13)

Division membership

Current members

Former members

Division members

Place cursor over year for division champ or World Series team.

Years
NL East Division[A]
69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 00 01 02 03 04
New York Mets
Philadelphia Phillies
Montreal Expos
Pittsburgh Pirates[C]  
St. Louis Cardinals[C]  
Chicago Cubs[C]  
  Florida Marlins[B]
  Atlanta Braves[C]
05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40
New York Mets
Philadelphia Phillies
Washington Nationals[D]
Florida Marlins Miami Marlins[E]
Atlanta Braves
     Team not in division      Division Won World Series      Division Won NL Championship
A The creation of the division with the expansion of the league – with the Expos added.
B Florida Marlins added in the 1993 expansion
C The Atlanta Braves moved in from the NL West, and the Chicago Cubs, Pittsburgh Pirates, and St. Louis Cardinals moved into newly created National League Central Division
D The Montreal Expos relocated to Washington, D.C., becoming the Washington Nationals
E The Florida Marlins relocated from Miami Gardens, Florida to Miami and changed their name to the Miami Marlins

Champions by year

  • Team names link to the season in which each team played
Year Winner Record % Playoffs
1969 New York Mets 100–62 .617 Won World Series over Baltimore, 4–1
1970 Pittsburgh Pirates 89–73 .549 Lost NLCS to Cincinnati, 3–0
1971 Pittsburgh Pirates (2) 97–65 .599 Won World Series over Baltimore, 4–3
1972 Pittsburgh Pirates (3) 96–59 .619 Lost NLCS to Cincinnati, 3–2
1973 New York Mets (2) 82–79 .509 Lost World Series to Oakland, 4–3
1974 Pittsburgh Pirates (4) 88–74 .543 Lost NLCS to Los Angeles, 3–1
1975 Pittsburgh Pirates (5) 92–69 .571 Lost NLCS to Cincinnati, 3–0
1976 Philadelphia Phillies 101–61 .623 Lost NLCS to Cincinnati, 3–0
1977 Philadelphia Phillies (2) 101–61 .623 Lost NLCS to Los Angeles, 3–1
1978 Philadelphia Phillies (3) 90–72 .556 Lost NLCS to Los Angeles, 3–1
1979 Pittsburgh Pirates (6) 98–64 .605 Won World Series over Baltimore, 4–3
1980 Philadelphia Phillies (4) 91–71 .562 Won World Series over Kansas City, 4–2
1981 Montreal Expos 60–48 .556 Lost NLCS to Los Angeles, 3–2
1982 St. Louis Cardinals 92–70 .570 Won World Series over Milwaukee, 4–3
1983 Philadelphia Phillies (5) 90–72 .556 Lost World Series to Baltimore, 4–1
1984 Chicago Cubs 96–65 .596 Lost NLCS to San Diego, 3–2
1985 St. Louis Cardinals (2) 101–61 .623 Lost World Series to Kansas City, 4–3
1986 New York Mets (3) 108–54 .667 Won World Series over Boston, 4–3
1987 St. Louis Cardinals (3) 95–67 .586 Lost World Series to Minnesota, 4–3
1988 New York Mets (4) 100–60 .625 Lost NLCS to Los Angeles, 4–3
1989 Chicago Cubs (2) 93–69 .574 Lost NLCS to San Francisco, 4–1
1990 Pittsburgh Pirates (7) 95–67 .586 Lost NLCS to Cincinnati, 4–2
1991 Pittsburgh Pirates (8) 98–64 .605 Lost NLCS to Atlanta, 4–3
1992 Pittsburgh Pirates (9) 96–66 .593 Lost NLCS to Atlanta, 4–3
1993 Philadelphia Phillies (6) 97–65 .599 Lost World Series to Toronto, 4–2
1994§ No playoffs due to 1994–95 Major League Baseball strike
1995 Atlanta Braves 90–54 .625 Won World Series over Cleveland, 4–2
1996 Atlanta Braves (2) 96–66 .593 Lost World Series to New York, 4–2
1997 Atlanta Braves (3) 101–61 .623 Lost NLCS to Florida, 4–2
1998 Atlanta Braves (4) 106–56 .654 Lost NLCS to San Diego, 4–2
1999 Atlanta Braves (5) 103–59 .636 Lost World Series to New York, 4–0
2000 Atlanta Braves (6) 95–67 .586 Lost NLDS to St. Louis, 3–0
2001 Atlanta Braves (7) 88–74 .543 Lost NLCS to Arizona, 4–1
2002 Atlanta Braves (8) 101–59 .631 Lost NLDS to San Francisco, 3–2
2003 Atlanta Braves (9) 101–61 .623 Lost NLDS to Chicago, 3–2
2004 Atlanta Braves (10) 96–66 .593 Lost NLDS to Houston, 3–2
2005 Atlanta Braves (11) 90–72 .556 Lost NLDS to Houston, 3–1
2006 New York Mets (5) 97–65 .599 Lost NLCS to St. Louis, 4–3
2007 Philadelphia Phillies (7) 89–73 .549 Lost NLDS to Colorado, 3–0
2008 Philadelphia Phillies (8) 92–70 .568 Won World Series over Tampa Bay, 4–1
2009 Philadelphia Phillies (9) 93–69 .574 Lost World Series to New York, 4–2
2010 Philadelphia Phillies (10) 97–65 .599 Lost NLCS to San Francisco, 4–2
2011 Philadelphia Phillies (11) 102–60 .630 Lost NLDS to St. Louis, 3–2
2012 Washington Nationals (2) 98–64 .605 Lost NLDS to St. Louis, 3–2
2013 Atlanta Braves (12) 96–66 .593 Lost NLDS to Los Angeles, 3–1
2014 Washington Nationals (3) 96–66 .593 Lost NLDS to San Francisco, 3–1
2015 New York Mets (6) 90–72 .556 Lost World Series to Kansas City, 4–1
2016 Washington Nationals (4) 95–67 .586 Lost NLDS to Los Angeles, 3–2
2017 Washington Nationals (5) 97–65 .599 Lost NLDS to Chicago, 3–2
2018 Atlanta Braves (13) 90–72 .556 Lost NLDS to Los Angeles, 3–1

† – Due to the 1981 Major League Baseball strike, the season was split. Montreal won the second half and defeated first-half champion Philadelphia (59–48) in the postseason.
§ – Due to the 1994–95 Major League Baseball strike starting August 12, no official winner was awarded. Montreal was leading at the strike.

Most Division titles

Team Titles Year(s)
Atlanta Braves 13 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2013, 2018
Philadelphia Phillies 11 1976, 1977, 1978, 1980, 1983, 1993, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011
Pittsburgh Pirates 9 1970, 1971, 1972, 1974, 1975, 1979, 1990, 1991, 1992
New York Mets 6 1969, 1973, 1986, 1988, 2006, 2015
Washington Nationals/Montreal Expos 5 1981, 2012, 2014, 2016, 2017
St. Louis Cardinals 3 1982, 1985, 1987
Chicago Cubs 2 1984, 1989
Miami/Florida Marlins 0
  • Italics indicate teams no longer in the division.
  • Note that because of the wild card postseason berth, the Miami Marlins have two World Series wins (1997, 2003) without ever winning the division.

Wildcard winners produced

Year Winner Record % GB Playoffs
1997 Florida Marlins 92–70 .568 9 Won World Series over Cleveland, 4–3
1999 New York Mets* 97–66 .595 6.5 Lost NLCS to Atlanta, 4–2
2000 New York Mets 94–68 .580 1 Lost World Series to New York, 4–1
2003 Florida Marlins 91–71 .562 10 Won World Series over New York, 4–2
2010 Atlanta Braves 91–71 .562 6 Lost NLDS to San Francisco, 3–1
2012 Atlanta Braves** 94–68 .580 4 Lost NLWC to St. Louis
2016 New York Mets** 87–75 .537 8 Lost NLWC to San Francisco

* – Defeated the Cincinnati Reds in a one-game playoff for the Wild Card, 5–0.

** – Starting with the 2012 season, there will be two Wild Card winners in each league. The qualifiers will play a single-game playoff to determine who will face the top-seeded team in the National League Division Series.

See also

References

  1. ^ Collier, Gene (September 27, 1993). "Pirates, Phillies Have Owned the Outgoing NL East Division". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. p. D1.
  2. ^ Collier, Gene (July 4, 2005). "Pirates—Phillies: A Rivalry Lost and Missed". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. p. D1.
  3. ^ Von Benko, George (July 7, 2005). "Notes: Phils–Pirates rivalry fading". Philadelphia Phillies. Major League Baseball. Archived from the original on July 14, 2011. Retrieved January 3, 2011.
  4. ^ "Pirates perform rare three-peat feat 4-2". USA Today. September 28, 1992. p. 5C.
  5. ^ https://www.nytimes.com/1993/09/16/sports/baseball-pirates-relent-on-new-alignment.html?pagewanted=print
  6. ^ "Starkey: Pirates in American League' Yes!". TribLIVE.com. 16 June 2011. Retrieved 4 October 2014.
1969 New York Mets season

The 1969 New York Mets season was the team's eighth as a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise and culminated when they won the World Series over the Baltimore Orioles. They played their home games at Shea Stadium and were managed by Gil Hodges. The team is often referred to as the "Amazin' Mets" (a nickname coined by Casey Stengel, who managed the team from their inaugural season to 1965) or the "Miracle Mets".

The 1969 season was the first season of divisional play in Major League Baseball. The Mets were assigned to the newly created National League East division. In their seven previous seasons, the Mets had never finished higher than ninth place in the ten-team National League and had never had a winning season. They lost at least one hundred games in five of the seasons. However, they overcame mid-season difficulties while the division leaders for much of the season, the Chicago Cubs, suffered a late-season collapse. The Mets finished 100–62, eight games ahead of the Cubs. The Mets went on to defeat the National League West champion Atlanta Braves three games to none in the inaugural National League Championship Series and went on to defeat the American League champion Baltimore Orioles in five games. First baseman Donn Clendenon was named the series' most valuable player on the strength of his .357 batting average, three home runs, and four runs batted in.

On Saturday, August 22, 2009, many of the surviving members of the 1969 championship team reunited at the New York Mets' present park, Citi Field.

1973 New York Mets season

The 1973 New York Mets season was the 12th regular season for the Mets, who played home games at Shea Stadium. Manager Yogi Berra led the team to a National League East title with an 82–79 record, the National League pennant and a defeat by the Oakland Athletics in the World Series. Their .509 winning percentage is the lowest of any pennant-winner in major league history. Having won only 82 games during the regular season, they, along with the 2005 San Diego Padres, qualified for the postseason with the fewest number of regular season wins since Major League Baseball expanded to a 162-game season in 1961, and the fewest of any team since 1885 (excluding the strike-shortened 1981 season). The season was well known for pitcher Tug McGraw's catchphrase "Ya Gotta Believe!!!"

1982 St. Louis Cardinals season

The St. Louis Cardinals' 1982 season was the team's 101st season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 91st season in the National League. Making up for the previous season's near-miss, the Cardinals went 92—70 during the season and won their first-ever National League East Division title by three games over the Philadelphia Phillies. They achieved their first postseason appearance since 1968 and defeated the National League West champion Atlanta Braves in three straight games to claim the NL pennant. From there, they went on to win the World Series in seven games over the American League champion Milwaukee Brewers. It was the Cardinals' first World Championship since 1967, and their last until they opened the current Busch Stadium in 2006.

1983 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1983 Philadelphia Phillies season included the Phillies winning the National League East Division title with a record of 90–72, by a margin of six games over the Pittsburgh Pirates. They defeated the Los Angeles Dodgers, three games to one in the National League Championship Series, before losing the World Series to the Baltimore Orioles, four games to one. The Phillies celebrated their centennial in 1983, were managed by Pat Corrales (43–42) and Paul Owens (47–30), and played their home games at Veterans Stadium.

1985 St. Louis Cardinals season

The St. Louis Cardinals' 1985 season was the team's 104th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 94th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 101-61 during the season and finished in first place in the National League East division by three games over the New York Mets. After defeating the Los Angeles Dodgers in six games in the NLCS, they lost in seven games in the World Series to their cross-state rivals, the Kansas City Royals in the I-70 Series. The World Series is known for the infamous "safe" call on the Royals' Jorge Orta by umpire Don Denkinger.

The Cardinals switched back to their traditional gray road uniforms for the first time in ten seasons.

Outfielder Willie McGee won the National League MVP Award this year, batting .353 with 10 home runs and 82 RBIs. Outfielder Vince Coleman won the National League Rookie of the Year Award this year, batting .267 with 107 runs scored and 110 stolen bases. Shortstop Ozzie Smith and McGee both won Gold Gloves this year.

During the 1985 playoffs, the Cardinals used the slogan The Heat Is On, in reference to the song that was released earlier that year.

1987 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1987 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 106th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 96th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 95-67 during the season and finished first in the National League East Division for the third and last time before moving to the NL Central in 1994. They went on to win the NLCS in seven games over the San Francisco Giants. In the World Series against the Minnesota Twins, after having fallen behind 2-0 at the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome, they won their next three games at home. However, back at the Metrodome, they lost the last two and fell one game short of a World Series title. It would be the Cardinals' last World Series appearance until 2004.

1988 New York Mets season

The New York Mets' 1988 season was the 27th regular season for the Mets. They went 100–60 and finished first in the NL East. They were managed by Davey Johnson. They played home games at Shea Stadium.

1997 Atlanta Braves season

The 1997 Atlanta Braves season marked the franchise's 32nd season in Atlanta and 127th overall. The Braves won their sixth consecutive division title, taking the National League East title by 9 games over the second place Florida Marlins. However, the Marlins would later defeat the Braves in the 1997 National League Championship Series. 1997 was the first year that the Braves played their home games in Turner Field, which originally served as a venue for the 1996 Summer Olympics.

1998 Atlanta Braves season

The 1998 Atlanta Braves season marked the franchise's 33rd season in Atlanta and 128th overall. They went on to win their seventh consecutive division title, taking the National League East title by 18 games over the second place New York Mets.

The team featured six all stars: shortstop Walt Weiss and third baseman Chipper Jones were voted as starters, while first baseman Andrés Galarraga, catcher Javy López, and pitchers Tom Glavine and Greg Maddux were selected as reserves. Jones and Lopez each hit over 30 home runs as Galaragga (acquired from Colorado) led the club in home runs and RBI. Galaragga finished as an MVP candidate.

The 1998 Braves beat the Chicago Cubs three games to none in the National League Division Series. In the next round Atlanta then lost to the San Diego Padres in the National League Championship Series four games to two. Despite winning two games after losing the first three, Atlanta's comeback bid came short by being eliminated in game 6. San Diego's winning over Atlanta was seen as one of the biggest upsets in postseason history.

This team has earned a few historic accolades. ESPN writer David Schoenfield lists them as one of the top teams in MLB history to not win a World SeriesESPN columnist Jeff Merron also writes that the pitching staff of Maddux, Glavine, John Smoltz, Denny Neagle, and Kevin Millwood was the greatest of all time. The quintet posted a cumulative 2.97 ERA and amassed 88 wins (almost 18 wins per starter), equaling the win total of the 2nd place Mets. The 1998 Braves are the only team in MLB history to have five pitchers each strike out 150 batters in the same season. Glavine, the lone 20 game winner in the National League for that year, won the Cy Young Award.

2002 Atlanta Braves season

The 2002 Atlanta Braves season marked the franchise's 37th season in Atlanta and 132nd overall. The Braves won their 11th consecutive division title, finishing 19 games ahead of the second-place Montreal Expos. The Braves lost the 2002 Divisional Series to the eventual NL Champion San Francisco Giants, 3 games to 2.

2002 marked the final year that pitchers Tom Glavine, Greg Maddux and John Smoltz played on the same team ending the reign of what has been considered by many the greatest pitching trio of all-time. All three would be inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame a decade later. Smoltz set the Braves' single season record for saves (55). Chipper Jones moved to the outfield in left field to allow for Vinny Castilla to be signed and added to the lineup at third base. Julio Franco became a regular player in the second stint of his Major League career and Gary Sheffield was acquired to the Braves in 2002, playing at right field.

2003 Atlanta Braves season

The 2003 Atlanta Braves season marked the franchise's 38th season in Atlanta and 133rd overall. The Braves won their 12th consecutive division title, finishing 10 games ahead of the second-place Florida Marlins. The Braves lost the 2003 Divisional Series to the Chicago Cubs, 3 games to 2. The Braves finished 2003 with their best offensive season in franchise history, hitting a franchise record 235 home runs. Atlanta also had one of the most noteworthy combined offensive outfield productions in league history.

The Braves' starting rotation had new faces in 2003, but aged pitchers. Opposite of what they were traditionally known for in years earlier. Greg Maddux was joined by trade acquisitions Mike Hampton and Russ Ortiz, free agent Shane Reynolds and rookie Horacio Ramírez. Critics noted had Atlanta had a younger staff with this offense, they would've been more likely to win the World Series. Marcus Giles had an All-Star season as the Braves' second baseman and Gary Sheffield as the Braves' right fielder. Sheffield finished with a top 5 voting in NL MVP voting. 2003 also marked the last season for Maddux, ending his tenure in Atlanta after 11 seasons.

2004 Atlanta Braves season

The 2004 Atlanta Braves season marked the franchise's 39th season in Atlanta and 134th overall. The Braves won their 13th consecutive division title under Manager of the Year Bobby Cox, finishing 10 games ahead of the second-place Philadelphia Phillies. The Braves lost the 2004 Divisional Series to the Houston Astros, 3 games to 2.

J. D. Drew replaced Gary Sheffield (lost to the Yankees in free agency) in the outfield, free agent John Thomson joined the rotation, and rookies Adam LaRoche and Charles Thomas saw significant playing time on a younger 2004 Braves team.

2005 Atlanta Braves season

The 2005 Atlanta Braves season marked the franchise's 40th season in Atlanta and the 135th season overall. The Braves won their 14th consecutive division title under Manager of the Year Bobby Cox, finishing 2 games ahead of the second-place Philadelphia Phillies. This was Atlanta's final division title in their consecutive run. The Braves lost the 2005 Divisional Series to the Houston Astros, 3 games to 1.

Tim Hudson joined the Braves' rotation and rookies Jeff Francoeur, Kelly Johnson and Brian McCann had their first seasons with Atlanta in 2005.

2006 New York Mets season

The New York Mets' 2006 season was the 45th regular season for the Mets. They went 97-65 and won the NL East, a feat the team would not repeat until 2015. They were managed by Willie Randolph. They played home games at Shea Stadium. They used the marketing slogan of "The Team. The Time. The Mets." throughout the season.

2007 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 2007 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 125th season in the history of the franchise. It would begin with the Phillies approaching a historic mark. The Phillies started the year with an MLB-record 9,955 losses in franchise history. On July 15, they lost their 10,000th game to the St. Louis Cardinals, becoming the first professional sports team in modern history to reach that milestone. The Phillies rallied in the closing days of the season, winning their final game against the Nationals. This win and the New York Mets loss to the Florida Marlins gave them the NL East title, making good on Jimmy Rollins's now famed "we're the team to beat" speech during spring training. They were swept in the opening round of the postseason by the Colorado Rockies.

List of New York Mets owners and executives

The New York Mets are a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise based in Queens, in New York City, New York. They play in the National League East division. In the team's history (1962-), the Mets have employed 12 general managers (GMs). The GM controls player transactions, hiring and firing of the coaching staff, and negotiates with players and agents regarding contracts. The longest-tenured GM is Frank Cashen, who held the position for 11 years (1980–1990).

List of Washington Nationals managers

The Washington Nationals are an American professional baseball franchise based in Washington, D.C. They are members of the National League (NL) East Division in Major League Baseball (MLB). The team began playing in 1969 as an expansion team in Montreal, Quebec, then known as the Montreal Expos. There have been 18 different managers in the franchise's history. The team has played its home games at the Nationals Park since 2008. The Nationals are owned by Ted Lerner, with Mike Rizzo as their general manager.The Expos' first manager was Gene Mauch, who managed for six seasons. Felipe Alou is the franchise's all-time leader in regular season games managed (1,408) and regular season game wins (691). Jim Fanning is the only Expos manager to have gone into the post-season. Buck Rodgers and Alou are the only managers to have won the NL Manager of the Year Award with the Expos, in 1987 and 1994 respectively. Karl Kuehl, Jim Fanning, and Tom Runnells have all spent their entire MLB managing careers with the Expos/Nationals. After Manny Acta was fired during the 2009 season, Jim Riggleman, the bench coach, was named interim manager to replace him, and was promoted to the position full-time for the 2010 season. After Riggleman resigned during the 2011 season and John McLaren ran the team for three games as an interim manager, the team hired veteran manager Davey Johnson, who had previously served as an advisor to Rizzo. Johnson led the team to the 2012 National League East title and the franchise's first playoff berth since moving to Washington and was 2012's NL Manager of the Year, but the team did not advance past the 2012 National League Division Series. Johnson retired after the 2013 season. Matt Williams took over in 2014, leading the team to another National League East title that season, and was 2014 NL Manager of the Year, but the team did not advance past the 2014 NLDS, and Williams was fired after an unsuccessful second year in 2015. Dusty Baker managed the team in 2016 and 2017, leading it to consecutive National League East titles, but the team did not advance beyond the NLDS in either season and Baker's contract was not renewed after the 2017 season. The Nationals hired Dave Martinez in October 2017 to take the helm in 2018

National League

The National League of Professional Baseball Clubs, known simply as the National League (NL), is the older of two leagues constituting Major League Baseball (MLB) in the United States and Canada, and the world's oldest current professional team sports league. Founded on February 2, 1876, to replace the National Association of Professional Base Ball Players (NAPBBP) of 1871–1875 (often called simply the "National Association"), the NL is sometimes called the Senior Circuit, in contrast to MLB's other league, the American League, which was founded 25 years later.

Both leagues currently have 15 teams. After two years of conflict in a "baseball war" of 1901–1902, the two eight-team leagues agreed in a "peace pact" to recognize each other as "major leagues", draft rules regarding player contracts, prohibiting "raiding", regulating relationships with minor leagues and lower level clubs, and with each establishing a team in the nation's largest metropolis of New York City, and the league champions of 1903 arranged to compete against each other in the new professional baseball championship tournament with the inaugural "World Series" that Fall of 1903, succeeding earlier similar national series in previous decades since the 1880s. After the 1904 champions failed to reach a similar agreement, the two leagues also formalized the new World Series tournament beginning in 1905 as an arrangement between the leagues themselves. National League teams have won 48 of the 114 World Series championships contested from 1903 to 2018.

New York Mets

The New York Mets are a Major League Baseball team based in the New York City borough of Queens. The Mets compete in the National League East division. They are one of two Major League clubs based in New York City; the other is the New York Yankees of the American League East.

One of baseball's first expansion teams, the Mets were founded in 1962 to replace New York's departed NL teams, the Brooklyn Dodgers and New York Giants. The Mets' colors combine the Dodgers' blue and the Giants' orange. For the 1962 and 1963 seasons, the Mets played home games at the Polo Grounds. From 1964 to 2008, their home ballpark was Shea Stadium. In 2009, they moved into their current ballpark, Citi Field.In their inaugural season, the Mets posted a record of 40–120, the worst regular season record since MLB went to a 162-game schedule. The team never finished better than second to last until the "Miracle Mets" beat the Baltimore Orioles in the 1969 World Series, one of the biggest upsets in World Series history. Since then, they have played in four World Series, including a dramatic run in 1973 that ended in a seven-game loss to the Oakland Athletics, a second championship in 1986 over the Boston Red Sox, a Subway Series loss against their cross-town rivals the New York Yankees in 2000, and a five-game loss to the Kansas City Royals in 2015.

The Mets qualified to play in the Major League Baseball postseason in 1988 and 2006, coming within one game of the World Series both years. After near-misses in 2007 and 2008, the Mets made the playoffs in 2015 for the first time in nine years, and won their first NL pennant in 15 years. The team again returned to the playoffs in 2016, this time with a wild card berth. This was the team's second back-to-back playoff appearance, the first occurring during the 1999 and 2000 seasons.

At the end of the 2018 MLB season, the Mets overall win-loss record was 4362–4732, a .480 win percentage.

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