National Football League Most Valuable Player Award

The National Football League Most Valuable Player Award (NFL MVP) is an award given by various entities to the American football player who is considered the most valuable in the National Football League (NFL) during the regular season. Organizations which currently give an NFL MVP award or have in the past include the Associated Press (AP), the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), Pro Football Writers of America (PFWA), and United Press International (UPI). The first award described as a most valuable player award was the Joe F. Carr Trophy, awarded by the NFL from 1938 to 1946. Today, the AP award is considered the de facto official NFL MVP award.[1] Since the 2011 season, the NFL has held the annual NFL Honors ceremony to recognize the winner of the Associated Press MVP award.[2]

Peyton Manning passing
Peyton Manning was named AP NFL MVP five times, more than any other player in history.

Associated Press NFL MVP award

The AP has presented an MVP award since 1957.[3][4] The award is voted upon by a panel of 50 sportswriters at the end of the regular season, before the playoffs, though the results are not announced to the public until the day before the Super Bowl.

Pro Football Writers Association NFL MVP award

Pro Football Writers of America began naming their most valuable player in 1975 and continue to do so as of the 2017 season.[1][5]

Season Player Team Position Ref
1975 Fran Tarkenton Minnesota Vikings Quarterback
1976 Bert Jones Baltimore Colts Quarterback
1977 Walter Payton Chicago Bears Running back
1978 Earl Campbell Houston Oilers Running back
1979 Earl Campbell (2) Houston Oilers Running back
1980 Brian Sipe Cleveland Browns Quarterback
1981 Ken Anderson Cincinnati Bengals Quarterback
1982 Dan Fouts San Diego Chargers Quarterback
1983 Joe Theismann Washington Redskins Quarterback
1984 Dan Marino Miami Dolphins Quarterback
1985 Marcus Allen Los Angeles Raiders Running back
1986 Lawrence Taylor New York Giants Linebacker
1987 Jerry Rice San Francisco 49ers Wide receiver [6]
1988 Boomer Esiason Cincinnati Bengals Quarterback [7]
1989 Joe Montana San Francisco 49ers Quarterback
1990 Randall Cunningham Philadelphia Eagles Quarterback
1991 Thurman Thomas Buffalo Bills Running back
1992 Steve Young San Francisco 49ers Quarterback
1993 Emmitt Smith Dallas Cowboys Running back
1994 Steve Young (2) San Francisco 49ers Quarterback [8]
1995 Brett Favre Green Bay Packers Quarterback
1996 Brett Favre (2) Green Bay Packers Quarterback
1997 Barry Sanders Detroit Lions Running back
1998 Terrell Davis Denver Broncos Running back
1999 Kurt Warner St. Louis Rams Quarterback
2000 Marshall Faulk St. Louis Rams Running back
2001 Kurt Warner (2) St. Louis Rams Quarterback
2002 Rich Gannon Oakland Raiders Quarterback
2003 Peyton Manning Indianapolis Colts Quarterback
2003 Steve McNair Tennessee Titans Quarterback [9]
2004 Peyton Manning (2) Indianapolis Colts Quarterback
2005 Shaun Alexander Seattle Seahawks Running back
2006 LaDainian Tomlinson San Diego Chargers Running back
2007 Tom Brady New England Patriots Quarterback
2008 Peyton Manning (3) Indianapolis Colts Quarterback
2009 Peyton Manning (4) Indianapolis Colts Quarterback
2010 Tom Brady (2) New England Patriots Quarterback
2011 Aaron Rodgers Green Bay Packers Quarterback
2012 Adrian Peterson Minnesota Vikings Running back
2013 Peyton Manning (5) Denver Broncos Quarterback [10]
2014 Aaron Rodgers (2) Green Bay Packers Quarterback [11]
2015 Cam Newton Carolina Panthers Quarterback [1]
2016 Matt Ryan Atlanta Falcons Quarterback [12]
2017 Tom Brady (3) New England Patriots Quarterback [13]
2018 Patrick Mahomes II Kansas City Chiefs Quarterback

Sporting News NFL Player of the Year award

Sporting News began awarding a National Football League (NFL) player of the year award in 1954. From 1970 to 1979, Sporting News chose American Football Conference (AFC) and National Football Conference (NFC) players of the year, and returned to a single winner in 1980. Beginning in 2012 Sporting News chose an offensive player of the year and a defensive player of the year.[14][15]

Season Player Team Position
1954 Lou Groza Cleveland Browns Tackle-K
1955 Otto Graham Cleveland Browns Quarterback
1956 Frank Gifford New York Giants Running back
1957 Jim Brown Cleveland Browns Fullback
1958 Jim Brown (2) Cleveland Browns Fullback
1959 Johnny Unitas Baltimore Colts Quarterback
1960 Norm Van Brocklin Philadelphia Eagles Quarterback
1961 Paul Hornung Green Bay Packers Running back
1962 Y. A. Tittle New York Giants Quarterback
1963 Y. A. Tittle (2) New York Giants Quarterback
1964 Johnny Unitas (2) Baltimore Colts Quarterback
1965 Jim Brown (3) Cleveland Browns Running back
1966 Bart Starr Green Bay Packers Quarterback
1967 Johnny Unitas (3) Baltimore Colts Quarterback
1968 Earl Morrall Baltimore Colts Quarterback
1969 Roman Gabriel Los Angeles Rams Quarterback
1970 NFC- John Brodie
AFC- George Blanda
San Francisco 49ers
Oakland Raiders
Quarterback
QB-K
1971 NFC- Roger Staubach
AFC- Bob Griese
Dallas Cowboys
Miami Dolphins
Quarterback
Quarterback
1972 NFC- Larry Brown
AFC- Earl Morrall (2)
Washington Redskins
Miami Dolphins
Running back
Quarterback
1973 NFC- John Hadl
AFC- O.J. Simpson
Los Angeles Rams
Buffalo Bills
Quarterback
Running back
1974 NFC- Chuck Foreman
AFC- Ken Stabler
Minnesota Vikings
Oakland Raiders
Running back
Quarterback
1975 NFC- Fran Tarkenton
AFC- O. J. Simpson (2)
Minnesota Vikings
Buffalo Bills
Quarterback
Running Back
1976 NFC- Walter Payton
AFC- Ken Stabler (2)
Chicago Bears
Oakland Raiders
Running back
Quarterback
1977 NFC- Walter Payton (2)
AFC- Craig Morton
Chicago Bears
Denver Broncos
Running back
Quarterback
1978 NFC- Archie Manning
AFC- Earl Campbell
New Orleans Saints
Houston Oilers
Quarterback
Running back
1979 NFC- Ottis Anderson
AFC- Dan Fouts
St. Louis Cardinals
San Diego Chargers
Running back
Quarterback
1980 Brian Sipe Cleveland Browns Quarterback
1981 Ken Anderson Cincinnati Bengals Quarterback
1982 Mark Moseley Washington Redskins Kicker
1983 Eric Dickerson Los Angeles Rams Running back
1984 Dan Marino Miami Dolphins Quarterback
1985 Marcus Allen[16] Los Angeles Raiders Running back
1986 Lawrence Taylor New York Giants Linebacker
1987 John Elway Denver Broncos Quarterback
1988 Boomer Esiason Cincinnati Bengals Quarterback
1989 Joe Montana San Francisco 49ers Quarterback
1990 Joe Montana (2) San Francisco 49ers Quarterback
1991 Thurman Thomas Buffalo Bills Running back
1992 Steve Young San Francisco 49ers Quarterback
1993 Emmitt Smith Dallas Cowboys Running back
1994 Steve Young (2) San Francisco 49ers Quarterback
1995 Brett Favre Green Bay Packers Quarterback
1996 Brett Favre (2) Green Bay Packers Quarterback
1997 Barry Sanders Brett Favre Detroit Lions

Green Bay Packers Quarterback Detroit Lions Runningback

1998 Terrell Davis Denver Broncos Running back
1999 Kurt Warner St. Louis Rams Quarterback
2000 Marshall Faulk St. Louis Rams Running back
2001 Marshall Faulk (2) St. Louis Rams Running back
2002 Rich Gannon Oakland Raiders Quarterback
2003 Steve McNair Peyton Manning Tennessee Titans Quarterback
2004 Peyton Manning (2) Indianapolis Colts Quarterback
2005 Shaun Alexander Seattle Seahawks Running back
2006 LaDainian Tomlinson San Diego Chargers Running back
2007 Tom Brady New England Patriots Quarterback
2008 Peyton Manning (3) Indianapolis Colts Quarterback
2009 Peyton Manning (4) Indianapolis Colts Quarterback
2010 Tom Brady (2) New England Patriots Quarterback
2011 Aaron Rodgers Green Bay Packers Quarterback
2012 Adrian Peterson Minnesota Vikings Running back
2013 Peyton Manning (5) Denver Broncos Quarterback
2014 Aaron Rodgers (2) Green Bay Packers Quarterback
2015 Cam Newton Carolina Panthers Quarterback
2016 Matt Ryan Atlanta Falcons Quarterback
2017 Tom Brady (3) New England Patriots Quarterback
2018 Patrick Mahomes II Kansas City Chiefs Quarterback

Defunct awards

Newspaper Enterprise Association NFL MVP award

The Newspaper Enterprise Association presented its MVP award from 1955 to 2008.[17] The winner was chosen by a poll of NFL players and received the Jim Thorpe Trophy,[18] which by 1975 was described as "one of the pros' most coveted honors."[19] Beginning in 1997, the trophy was presented by the Jim Thorpe Association, with the winner determined by a "vote of NFLPA representatives".[20]

Season Player Team Position Ref
1955 Harlon Hill Chicago Bears End [21]
1956 Frank Gifford New York Giants Running back [22]
1957 Johnny Unitas Baltimore Colts Quarterback [23]
1958 Jim Brown Cleveland Browns Fullback [24]
1959 Charlie Conerly New York Giants Quarterback [25]
1960 Norm Van Brocklin Philadelphia Eagles Quarterback [18]
1961 Y. A. Tittle New York Giants Quarterback [26]
1962 Jim Taylor Green Bay Packers Running back [27]
1963 Y. A. Tittle (2)
Jim Brown (2)
New York Giants
Cleveland Browns
Quarterback
Running back
[28]
1964 Lenny Moore Baltimore Colts Halfback [29]
1965 Jim Brown (3) Cleveland Browns Running back [30]
1966 Bart Starr Green Bay Packers Quarterback [31]
1967 Johnny Unitas (2) Baltimore Colts Quarterback [32]
1968 Earl Morrall Baltimore Colts Quarterback [33]
1969 Roman Gabriel Los Angeles Rams Quarterback [34]
1970 John Brodie San Francisco 49ers Quarterback [35]
1971 Bob Griese Miami Dolphins Quarterback [36]
1972 Larry Brown Washington Redskins Running back
1973 O. J. Simpson Buffalo Bills Running back
1974 Ken Stabler Oakland Raiders Quarterback
1975 Fran Tarkenton Minnesota Vikings Quarterback [37]
1976 Bert Jones Baltimore Colts Quarterback
1977 Walter Payton Chicago Bears Running back
1978 Earl Campbell Houston Oilers Running back [38]
1979 Earl Campbell (2) Houston Oilers Running back
1980 Earl Campbell (3) Houston Oilers Running back [39]
1981 Ken Anderson Cincinnati Bengals Quarterback
1982 Dan Fouts San Diego Chargers Quarterback
1983 Joe Theismann Washington Redskins Quarterback
1984 Dan Marino Miami Dolphins Quarterback
1985 Walter Payton (2) Chicago Bears Running back
1986 Phil Simms New York Giants Quarterback
1987 Jerry Rice San Francisco 49ers Wide receiver
1988 Roger Craig San Francisco 49ers Running back
1989 Joe Montana San Francisco 49ers Quarterback
1990 Warren Moon Houston Oilers Quarterback
1991 Thurman Thomas Buffalo Bills Running back
1992 Emmitt Smith Dallas Cowboys Running back
1993 Emmitt Smith (2) Dallas Cowboys Running back
1994 Steve Young San Francisco 49ers Quarterback
1995 Brett Favre Green Bay Packers Quarterback
1996 Brett Favre (2) Green Bay Packers Quarterback
1997 Barry Sanders Detroit Lions Running back
1998 Randall Cunningham Minnesota Vikings Quarterback
1999 Kurt Warner St. Louis Rams Quarterback
2000 Marshall Faulk St. Louis Rams Running back
2001 Kurt Warner (2) St. Louis Rams Quarterback
2002 Rich Gannon Oakland Raiders Quarterback
2003 Peyton Manning Indianapolis Colts Quarterback
2004 Peyton Manning (2) Indianapolis Colts Quarterback
2005 Shaun Alexander Seattle Seahawks Running back
2006 LaDainian Tomlinson San Diego Chargers Running back
2007 Tom Brady New England Patriots Quarterback
2008 Kurt Warner (3) Arizona Cardinals Quarterback

Joe F. Carr Trophy

The Joe F. Carr Trophy was the first award in the NFL to recognize a most valuable player. It was named in honor of NFL commissioner Joseph Carr and remains the only MVP award the NFL has officially sanctioned.[40]

Season Player Team Position
1938 Mel Hein New York Giants Center, linebacker
1939 Parker Hall Cleveland Rams Quarterback, halfback
1940 Ace Parker Brooklyn Dodgers Quarterback, halfback
1941 Don Hutson Green Bay Packers End
1942 Don Hutson (2) Green Bay Packers End
1943 Sid Luckman Chicago Bears Quarterback
1944 Frank Sinkwich Detroit Lions Halfback
1945 Bob Waterfield Cleveland Rams Quarterback
1946 Bill Dudley Pittsburgh Steelers Halfback

United Press International NFL MVP/POY award

United Press International gave an NFL MVP/player of the year award from 1948 through 1969, excepting 1949–50, and 1952. In 1970 UPI instituted separate awards for the NFC and AFC. In 1975 UPI added a Defensive Player of the Year Award for both the NFC and AFC.[41]

Season Player Team Position Ref
1948 Pat Harder Chicago Cardinals Fullback [42]
1949
No Award
1950
No Award
1951 Otto Graham Cleveland Browns Quarterback
1952
No Award
1953 Otto Graham (2) Cleveland Browns Quarterback [43]
1954 Joe Perry San Francisco 49ers Fullback [44]
1955 Otto Graham (3) Cleveland Browns Quarterback
1956 Frank Gifford New York Giants Halfback
1957 Y. A. Tittle San Francisco 49ers Quarterback [45]
1958 Jim Brown Cleveland Browns Fullback [46]
1959 Johnny Unitas Baltimore Colts Quarterback
1960 Norm Van Brocklin Philadelphia Eagles Quarterback [47]
1961 Paul Hornung Green Bay Packers Halfback
1962 Y. A. Tittle (2) New York Giants Quarterback
1963 Jim Brown (2) Cleveland Browns Fullback
1964 Johnny Unitas (2) Baltimore Colts Quarterback
1965 Jim Brown (3) Cleveland Browns Fullback
1966 Bart Starr Green Bay Packers Quarterback
1967 Johnny Unitas (3) Baltimore Colts Quarterback
1968 Earl Morrall Baltimore Colts Quarterback
1969 Roman Gabriel Los Angeles Rams Quarterback

See also

References

General
  • "Joe F. Carr Trophy (MVP) Winners". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved June 15, 2016.
  • "UPI NFL Most Valuable Player Winners". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved June 20, 2016.
  • "Newspaper Ent. Assoc. NFL Most Valuable Player Winners". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved June 20, 2016.
  • "AP NFL Most Valuable Player Winners". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved June 20, 2016.
  • "PFWA NFL Most Valuable Player Winners". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved June 20, 2016.
Footnotes
  1. ^ a b c Bieler, Des (January 20, 2016). "Pro Football Writers name Cam Newton their NFL MVP". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on August 17, 2016. Retrieved June 22, 2016.
  2. ^ "First-ever 'NFL Honors' show will be hosted by Baldwin in Indy". NFL.com. National Football League. January 3, 2012. Archived from the original on August 12, 2016. Retrieved June 21, 2016.
  3. ^ Kreinberg, Jake (February 3, 2016). "How we count the votes for the NFL's top awards". insights.ap.org. Associated Press. Archived from the original on May 28, 2016. Retrieved August 2, 2016.
  4. ^ "AP NFL Most Valuable Player Winners". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Archived from the original on June 10, 2016. Retrieved June 20, 2016.
  5. ^ "PFWA NFL Most Valuable Player Winners". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Archived from the original on May 31, 2016. Retrieved June 20, 2016.
  6. ^ "49er Rice Named 'Most Valuable'". Tyrone Daily Herald. United Press International. January 21, 1988. p. 4. Archived from the original on February 4, 2018. Retrieved June 14, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  7. ^ "Esiason named MVP by Writers Association". The Evening News. Associated Press. January 11, 1989. p. 2B. Retrieved September 24, 2016.
  8. ^ "Writers Choose 49ers Young As Mvp". Sun-Sentinel. January 25, 1995. Archived from the original on February 16, 2017. Retrieved February 16, 2017.
  9. ^ http://www.espn.com/nfl/news/story?id=1698744
  10. ^ Adams, Justin (January 15, 2014). Denver Broncos Peyton Manning named Pro Football Writers of America's MVP, Offensive Player of Year. TheDenverChannel.com. Archived February 3, 2014, at the Wayback MachineRetrieved September 24, 2016.
  11. ^ Mike Spofford (2015-01-14). "Green Bay Packers – Official Blog | Aaron Rodgers wins first league MVP award of 2014". Blog.packers.com. Archived from the original on January 27, 2016. Retrieved January 27, 2016.
  12. ^ Cunningham, Michael (January 18, 2017). "Pro Football Writers vote Falcons' Matt Ryan MVP". The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Archived from the original on January 19, 2017. Retrieved January 18, 2017.
  13. ^ "Brady 2017 NFL MVP; Gurley OPOY; Campbell DPOY - PFWA". profootballwriters.org. 17 January 2018. Archived from the original on 18 January 2018. Retrieved 2 May 2018.
  14. ^ [1] Archived 2009-07-16 at the Wayback Machine
  15. ^ Barry Wilner (2013-04-04). "Adrian Peterson Wins 2012 Offensive Player Of The Year Award". Huffingtonpost.com. Archived from the original on 2016-02-04. Retrieved 2016-01-27.
  16. ^ "Allen honored". The Galveston Daily News. Associated Press. January 23, 1986. p. 20. Archived from the original on January 18, 2018. Retrieved May 24, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  17. ^ "Newspaper Ent. Assoc. NFL Most Valuable Player Winners". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Archived from the original on June 10, 2016. Retrieved June 20, 2016.
  18. ^ a b Olderman, Murray (December 16, 1960). "Van Brocklin Gets Jim Thorpe Trophy". The Telegraph. Newspaper Enterprise Association. p. 12. Retrieved June 21, 2016.
  19. ^ "Harlon Hill Elected for Hall of Fame". Times Daily. October 26, 1975. p. 23. Retrieved June 21, 2016.
  20. ^ Jim Thorpe Association Yearbook, 2007.
  21. ^ Grainger, Charles (February 20, 1957). "Harlon Hill Due For Six Months' Army Service". The Tuscaloosa News. Associated Press. p. 9. Retrieved June 24, 2016.
  22. ^ "Giants' Frank Gifford Named Top Star in NFL by Players". The Pittsburgh Press. December 20, 1956. p. 24. Retrieved June 24, 2016.
  23. ^ Olderman, Murray (December 20, 1957). "John Unitas Wins Jim Thorpe Trophy". Miami Daily News-Record. Newspaper Enterprise Association. p. 5. Archived from the original on February 16, 2017. Retrieved February 16, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  24. ^ Olderman, Murray (December 16, 1958). "Cleveland's Jimmy Brown Grabs Jim Thorpe Trophy". TimesDaily. Newspaper Enterprise Association. p. 7. Retrieved June 29, 2016.
  25. ^ Olderman, Murray (December 20, 1959). "Giant Ace Wins Thorpe Title". Gadsden Times. Newspaper Enterprise Association. Retrieved June 29, 2016.
  26. ^ Olderman, Murray (December 27, 1961). "Players Name Tittle Thorpe Trophy Winner". The Telegraph. Newspaper Enterprise Association. p. 12. Retrieved June 27, 2016.
  27. ^ Olderman, Murray (December 18, 1962). "Thorpe Trophy Won By Packer Fullback". The Evening Sun. Newspaper Enterprise Association. p. 10. Retrieved February 15, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  28. ^ "Tittle and Brown Win Thorpe Trophy". The Fort Scott Tribune. Newspaper Enterprise Association. December 23, 1963. p. 11. Retrieved June 24, 2016.
  29. ^ Olderman, Murray (December 18, 1964). "Thorpe Trophy Caps Len Moore's Comeback". The Pittsburgh Press. p. 36. Retrieved June 27, 2016.
  30. ^ "11th Annual Thorpe Trophy Goes To Cleveland's Brown". The Bristol Daily Courier. Newspaper Enterprise Association. December 28, 1965. p. 21. Archived from the original on February 16, 2017. Retrieved February 16, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  31. ^ Olderman, Murray (December 22, 1966). "Bart Starr Is Selected Jim Thorpe Award Winner". Standard-Speaker. Newspaper Enterprise Association. p. 25. Retrieved February 16, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  32. ^ Olderman, Murray (December 29, 1967). "Unitas Claims Jim Thorpe Cup". The Daily Mail. Newspaper Enterprise Association. p. 10. Retrieved February 16, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  33. ^ Olderman, Murray (December 26, 1968). "Earl Morrall Wins Jim Thorpe Trophy". The Daily Herald. Newspaper Enterprise Association. p. 12. Archived from the original on February 16, 2017. Retrieved February 16, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  34. ^ Olderman, Murray (December 25, 1969). "Roman Gabriel Wins Jim Thorpe Award". The Gastonia Gazette. Newspaper Enterprise Association. p. 37. Archived from the original on February 16, 2017. Retrieved February 16, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  35. ^ Olderman, Murray (December 29, 1970). "John Brodie Wins The 1970 Jim Thorpe Award". Pampa Daily News. Newspaper Enterprise Association. p. 8. Archived from the original on February 16, 2017. Retrieved February 16, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  36. ^ "Bob Griese Gets Thorpe Trophy As Top Player". Gettysburg Times. Associated Press. January 5, 1972. p. 4. Retrieved June 21, 2016.
  37. ^ "Jim Thorpe award goes to Tarkenton". Gadsden Times. Newspaper Enterprise Association. January 21, 1976. p. 30. Retrieved June 24, 2016.
  38. ^ "Campbell wins Thorpe". Park City Daily News. December 26, 1979. p. 4-B. Retrieved June 30, 2016.
  39. ^ Olderman, Murray (January 18, 1981). "Earl Campbell: a triple champ". The Nevada Daily Mail. Newspaper Enterprise Association. p. 10. Retrieved June 30, 2016.
  40. ^ Turney, John (February 21, 2015). "Dutch Clark's Missing 1937 MVP Award". nflfootballjournal.com. Pro Football Journal. Archived from the original on June 17, 2016. Retrieved June 21, 2016.
  41. ^ Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. Bob Carroll. HarperCollins Publishers. ISBN 9780062701749 pg. 389.
  42. ^ "Connerly Named Prize Rookie; Harder Honored". The Tuscaloosa News. United Press. December 15, 1948. p. 13. Retrieved June 22, 2016.
  43. ^ "Graham Picked As Top Player In Pro League". Spokane Daily Chronicle. United Press. December 23, 1953. p. 11. Retrieved October 6, 2016.
  44. ^ "Perry Top Pro Gridman of '54". The Bend Bulletin. United Press. December 22, 1954. p. 3. Archived from the original on October 9, 2016. Retrieved October 8, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.
  45. ^ "Tittle, Francis Feted at Million Dollar Dinner". The Bulletin. United Press. January 29, 1958. p. 3. Retrieved August 15, 2016.
  46. ^ Wright, Earl (January 8, 1959). "Brown Named Standout Pro Gridder of Season". The Ogden Standard-Examiner. United Press International. p. 14. Archived from the original on February 26, 2017. Retrieved February 26, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  47. ^ "Buck Shaw Is Coach Of Year; Van Brocklin Also Honored". Daily Independent Journal. United Press International. December 23, 1960. p. 7. Archived from the original on March 12, 2017. Retrieved March 11, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.

-->|}

1982 Washington Redskins season

The 1982 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 51st season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 46th in Washington, D.C.. Although the Redskins lost all their preseason games, they were to advance from an 8–8 record the previous season to become the only team in NFL History to win the Super Bowl after not winning a pre-season game. Only the 1990 Buffalo Bills and the 2000 New York Giants have since made it to the Super Bowl after a winless pre-season.The 1982 NFL season was shortened from sixteen games per team to nine because of a players’ strike. The NFL adopted a special 16-team playoff tournament; eight teams from each conference were seeded 1–8, and division standings were ignored. Washington had the best record in the NFC, and were the number one seed in the conference for the playoff tournament.

The Redskins marched through the NFC playoffs, beating each of their opponents by an average of 19 points. In a rematch of Washington's only prior Super Bowl appearance ten years prior, the Redskins – in a game famous for Washington's "70 Chip’ play on fourth-and-1 – went on to beat the Miami Dolphins 27–17 to win Super Bowl XVII. It was the Redskins’ first ever Super Bowl victory, and their first NFL Championship in 40 years. Combining the post-season and their first Super Bowl victory, the Redskins finished the season with an overall record of 12–1.

Athlete of the Year

Athlete of the Year is an award given by various sports organizations for the athlete whom they have determined to be deserving of such recognition.

Bert Bell Award

The Bert Bell Award is presented by the Maxwell Football Club to the player of the year in the National Football League (NFL). The award is named in honor of Bert Bell (1895–1959), commissioner of the NFL and founder of the Maxwell Club. Voters for the Pro Awards are NFL owners, football personnel, head and assistant coaches as well as members of the Maxwell Football Club, national media, and local media. The award consists of a trophy in the form of a statue in the likeness of Bell. The award is presented at the club's annual football banquet.

Best NFL Player ESPY Award

The Best NFL Player ESPY Award has been presented annually since 1993 to the National Football League player adjudged to be the best in a given calendar year, namely in the NFL season immediately precedent to the holding of the ESPY Awards ceremony.

Between 1993 and 2004, the award voting panel comprised variously fans; sportswriters and broadcasters, sports executives, and retired sportspersons, termed collectively experts; but balloting thereafter has been exclusively by fans over the Internet from amongst choices selected by the ESPN Select Nominating Committee.

Through the 2001 iteration of the ESPY Awards, ceremonies were conducted in February of each year to honor achievements over the previous calendar year; awards presented thereafter are conferred in June and reflect performance from the June previous.

In 2014, Peyton Manning of the Denver Broncos became the first 3-time winner breaking a tie with Barry Sanders, Brett Favre, Marshall Faulk. Aaron Rodgers would later surpass him in 2017 when he won his fourth.

Frank Sinkwich

Frank Francis Sinkwich Sr. (October 10, 1920 – October 22, 1990) was an American football player and coach. He won the Heisman Trophy in 1942 playing for the University of Georgia, making him the first recipient from the Southeastern Conference. In the course of a brief but celebrated career in professional football, Sinkwich was selected for the National Football League Most Valuable Player Award. He coached the Erie (PA) Vets semi-professional football team in 1949. Sinkwich was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1954.

History of the Baltimore Colts

The Indianapolis Colts professional American football franchise was originally based in Baltimore, Maryland, as the Baltimore Colts from 1953 to 1984. The team was named for Baltimore's history of horse breeding and racing. It was the second incarnation of the Baltimore Colts, the first having played for three years in the All-America Football Conference and one in the National Football League (NFL). The 1953–83 Baltimore Colts team played its home games at Memorial Stadium.

Joe F. Carr Trophy

The Joe F. Carr Trophy was the first award given in the National Football League (NFL) to recognize a most valuable player for each season. It was first awarded in 1938, known then as the Gruen Trophy, and renamed in 1939 in honor of NFL commissioner Joseph Carr. The Gruen Trophy, sponsored by Gruen Watch Co., was first awarded in 1937 to Dutch Clark of the Detroit Lions. However, both contemporary and modern sources consider the 1938 award the first retroactive Joe F. Carr Trophy, and thus the first NFL MVP award. Players were chosen by a panel of sportswriters who distributed first and second place votes. It was awarded until the 1946 season, and it remains the only MVP award the NFL has officially sanctioned.

Kansas City Committee of 101 awards

The Kansas City Committee of 101 was founded by Jack Wheeler. The name was chosen because the membership was limited to 101 Kansas City Chiefs fans and cost $1,000 annually (over $6,550 adjusted for inflation). The group began presenting its annual NFL awards in 1969. They started as NFL and AFL Awards. After the 1970 AFL-NFL merger, however, they have been awarded to the top AFC and NFC players and coaches. The "Committee of 101" is a national media committee of 101 sportswriters and sportscasters, who cover the NFL, and are asked to vote on the top offensive player, defensive player, and coach on each of the National Football League conferences, rather than the NFL as a whole.The annual NFL 101 Awards, is the nation's oldest awards event dedicated exclusively to professional football.The awards are handed out at an annual event in Kansas City, Missouri, and all proceeds from the 101 Awards benefit the Kansas City Chiefs Charities.

List of Arizona Cardinals seasons

This is a list of seasons completed by the Arizona Cardinals. The Cardinals are an American football franchise competing as a member of the West division of the National Football Conference (NFC) in the National Football League (NFL). The list documents the season-by-season records of the Cardinals' franchise from 1920 to present, including postseason records, and league awards for individual players or head coaches.

List of Indianapolis Colts seasons

The Indianapolis Colts, formerly the Baltimore Colts, are an American football team playing in the National Football League (NFL). This list documents the season-by-season records of the Colts franchise from 1953 to present, including postseason records and league awards for individual players or head coaches. In 1953, a Baltimore-based group led by Carroll Rosenbloom gained the rights to a new Baltimore franchise. Rosenbloom was granted an NFL team, and was awarded the holdings of the defunct Dallas Texans organization. The new team was named the Colts after the previous team that folded after the 1950 NFL season. After 31 seasons in Baltimore, Colts owner Robert Irsay moved the team to Indianapolis, Indiana.The Colts have won two Super Bowl championships (Super Bowl V and Super Bowl XLI). They also played in and lost Super Bowl III and Super Bowl XLIV. Before the AFL and NFL merged in 1970, they won three NFL Championships (1958, 1959, and 1968). By winning Super Bowl XLI the Colts became the first team that played its home games in a domed stadium to win a Super Bowl held in an outdoor stadium.After the Colts owner Jim Irsay hired Tony Dungy in 2002, the Colts made the playoffs for nine straight seasons. They won five straight AFC South titles from 2003 to 2007 and had seven consecutive seasons of 12 or more victories from 2003 to 2009, the first time that has been achieved in the NFL's 90-year history. Much of the team's success throughout the 2000s was attributed to the trio of general manager Bill Polian, coach Dungy, and quarterback Peyton Manning.In the 2013 season, the Colts secured their first division championship since Manning's departure and first under quarterback Andrew Luck and head coach Chuck Pagano.

List of Indianapolis Colts starting quarterbacks

The Indianapolis Colts are a professional American football team based in Indianapolis, Indiana. They are currently members of the South Division of the American Football Conference (AFC) in the National Football League (NFL).

The club was officially founded in Baltimore, Maryland in 1953, as the Baltimore Colts, replacing a previous team of that name that folded in 1950. After 31 seasons in Baltimore, Colts owner Robert Irsay moved the team to Indianapolis.

The Colts have had 33 starting quarterbacks (QB) in the history of their franchise. The Colts' past starting quarterbacks include Pro Football Hall of Fame inductee Johnny Unitas, as well as the Associated Press National Football League Most Valuable Player Award (MVP) winners Earl Morrall and Bert Jones. Unitas also won the MVP award three times in his career. The franchise's first starting quarterback was Fred Enke, who started 9 games in total for the Colts. The Colts' starting quarterback from 1998 to 2011 was 5-time MVP Peyton Manning. The Colts' current starting quarterback is Andrew Luck.

List of New England Patriots seasons

The New England Patriots are an American football team based in Foxborough, Massachusetts. They compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's American Football Conference (AFC) East division. Originally called the Boston Patriots, the team was founded as one of eight charter members of the American Football League (AFL) in 1960 under the ownership of Billy Sullivan. The team became part of the NFL when the two leagues merged in 1970. The following year, they moved from Boston to nearby Foxborough, and changed their name to the New England Patriots.The modern NFL championship game, the Super Bowl, was founded in the 1966 season; the first four were contested between the champions of the AFL and the NFL. After the merger, the Super Bowl became the united league's championship. The Patriots made the 1963 AFL Championship Game, but struggled severely in the early years of the united league, not making the postseason until 1976. After a few good seasons including a Super Bowl appearance against a champion Bears outfit, the Patriots reached a nadir between 1989 and 1993 when they won only 19 of 80 games.

Since Bill Belichick was hired as the team's head coach in 2000, the Patriots have finished first or second in the AFC East every year except Belichick's first season, with both second-place finishes caused by tiebreakers. Over that time, they have won six Super Bowls, nine AFC Championship Games, and sixteen AFC East titles, while amassing a regular season record of 201–71. The team's quarterback over that same period, Tom Brady, has been awarded the NFL Most Valuable Player (MVP) three times, and the Super Bowl Most Valuable Player four times; he is one of only five players named Super Bowl MVP more than once, and the only one named 4 times.The Patriots have won six Super Bowl championships (XXXVI, XXXVIII, XXXIX, XLIX, LI, and LIII). They also played in and lost Super Bowls XX, XXXI, XLII, XLVI, and LII. During the 2007 regular season, the Patriots became the only NFL team in history to win 16 games, and the first since the 1972 Miami Dolphins (in a 14-game season) to complete the regular campaign undefeated. Belichick's Patriots are one of only two teams to win three Super Bowls in four years (the other being the Dallas Cowboys from 1993 to 1996).Overall, the Patriots have made 24 playoff appearances, one of which was before the merger. Since the merger, they have played fourteen AFC Championship Games, winning eleven of them to advance to the Super Bowl. In the Patriots' 56-year history, they have an overall regular season record of 476 wins, 383 losses, and 9 ties, plus an overall postseason record of 33 wins and 19 losses. In the 2018 NFL season, the Patriots reached their 11th Super Bowl, breaking their own record for most Super Bowl appearances by any organization of all time.

List of New York Giants seasons

The New York Giants are an American football team based in East Rutherford, New Jersey. They are a member of the National Football League (NFL) and play in the NFL's National Football Conference (NFC) East division. In 94 completed seasons, the franchise has won eight NFL championships, including four Super Bowl victories. The Giants have won more than 600 games and appeared in the NFL playoffs 32 times. Though the Giants play home games in East Rutherford, they draw fans from throughout the New York metropolitan area. In 2010, the team began playing in MetLife Stadium, formerly New Meadowlands Stadium.After Tim Mara paid $500 for the franchise, the Giants joined the NFL in the 1925 season and won their first championship two years later. In 1934, the team won its second title, defeating the Chicago Bears in the NFL Championship Game. The Giants won another championship four years later, and made four appearances in the NFL Championship Game from 1939 to 1946, losing each time. New York won its fourth NFL title in 1956, with a 47–7 win over the Bears in the championship game. From 1958 to 1963, the Giants reached the NFL Championship Game five times, but were defeated on each occasion. Following the 1963 season, the franchise did not return to the playoffs until 1981, only finishing .500 or better five times during the postseason drought.

Thirty years after the team's previous NFL title, the Giants were victorious in Super Bowl XXI, winning against the Denver Broncos 39–20 to end the 1986 season. The Giants won their second Super Bowl four years later, defeating the Buffalo Bills 20–19 in Super Bowl XXV. In the 2000 season, New York returned to the Super Bowl, but lost to the Baltimore Ravens 34–7. The 2007 season saw the Giants win their seventh NFL championship at Super Bowl XLII, where they defeated the previously unbeaten New England Patriots 17–14 in a game that is widely considered to be one of the biggest upsets in Super Bowl history. The Giants made four consecutive appearances in the playoffs from 2005 to 2008, before an 8–8 record in 2009 caused them to miss the postseason. After missing the playoffs in 2010, they defeated the Atlanta Falcons, Green Bay Packers, and San Francisco 49ers in the 2011 playoffs to reach Super Bowl XLVI, where they defeated the Patriots 21–17. In the most recent season, 2018, the Giants went 5–11 and did not qualify for the postseason.

Livingston, Texas

Livingston is a town in and the county seat of Polk County, Texas, United States. With a population of 5,335 at the 2010 census, it is the largest city in Polk County. It is located approximately seventy-five miles north of Houston and was originally settled in 1835 as Springfield. Its name was changed to Livingston and became the county seat of Polk County in 1846.The Alabama-Coushatta Indian Reservation is just to the east of Livingston. The 2000 census reported a resident population of 480 persons within the reservation.

TCU Horned Frogs football

The TCU Horned Frogs football team is the intercollegiate football team of Texas Christian University (TCU). The Horned Frogs compete in Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) in the United States.

Since 2012, the Horned Frogs have been a member of the Big 12 Conference, and were previously members of the Mountain West Conference (MWC), Western Athletic Conference (WAC), Conference USA (C-USA), Southwest Conference (SWC), and Texas Intercollegiate Athletic Association (TIAA).

TCU began playing football in 1896 and claims national championships in 1935 and 1938. TCU has one Heisman Trophy winner, Davey O'Brien, and has had eight former players inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame. The Horned Frogs play their home games in Amon G. Carter Stadium, which is located on the TCU campus in Fort Worth.

TCU ranks as the 28th best college football program of all time and the 4th best private college football school of all time, behind Notre Dame, USC, and Miami-FL. The Horned Frogs are also one of only four FBS teams to have played in all six College Football Playoff Bowls, winning all but the Fiesta and Orange.

In 2017, TCU and Coach Patterson reached their 10th 11 win season since Gary Patterson has been coaching for the program. That is the 4th most 11 win seasons since 2001 in all of college football.

Touchdown Club of Columbus

The Touchdown Club of Columbus was founded in Columbus, Ohio, in 1956 by Sam B. Nicola at the request of state auditor James A. Rhodes, who later became governor of the state. Nicola served as the club's president until his death in 1993. More than a decade later, his son Sam Nicola Jr. took over the Touchdown Club.

UPI NFC Player of the Year

From 1970 to 1996, United Press International (UPI) awarded the NFC Player of the Year award to players from the National Football League's National Football Conference (NFC).

University of Northern Iowa

The University of Northern Iowa (UNI) is a public university in Cedar Falls, Iowa. UNI offers more than 90 majors across the colleges of Business Administration, Education, Humanities, Arts, and Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences and graduate college. The fall 2018 enrollment is 11,212. More than 88 percent of its students are from the state of Iowa.

Washington D.C. Touchdown Club

The Washington D.C. Touchdown Club was started in 1935 with a passion for charity and sports. In the ensuing years the Club has benefited many local charities as well as providing scholarships to deserving student/athletes.

The Touchdown Timmies, the club's trophies, are given each year to athletes who excelled in their respective arenas including professionals, college and scholastic players. Additionally, the Club provided monies to 15 charitable organizations each year.

Recently, the name was changed to "Touchdown Club Charities of Washington, DC". It was founded by a group of college football enthusiasts in 1935, among them Dutch Bergman. The motto is "Children, Scholarship, and Community".

The Timmie Awards began with a formal dinner at the Willard Hotel in 1937 where All-American Quarterback Marshall Goldberg was honored as Best Player of the Year. Over the past sixty years, the club's dinner awards programs honoring of more than 200 outstanding college players and hundreds of professional high school athletes, have attracted celebrities from many fields and national media attention.

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