National Football League Coach of the Year Award

The National Football League Coach of the Year Award is presented annually by various news and sports organizations to the National Football League (NFL) head coach who has done the most outstanding job of working with the talent he has at his disposal. Currently, the most widely recognized award is presented by the Associated Press (AP), although in the past several awards received press recognition.[1][2][3] First presented in 1957, the AP award did not include American Football League (AFL) teams. The Sporting News has given a pro football coach of the year award since 1947 and in 1949 gave its award to a non-NFL coach, Paul Brown of the All-America Football Conference's Cleveland Browns. Other NFL Coach of the Year awards are presented by Pro Football Weekly/Pro Football Writers of America and the Maxwell Football Club. The United Press International (UPI) NFL Coach of the Year award was first presented in 1955. From 1960 to 1969, before the AFL–NFL merger, an award was also given to the most outstanding coach from the AFL. When the leagues merged in 1970, separate awards were given to the best coaches from the American Football Conference (AFC) and National Football Conference (NFC). The UPI discontinued the awards after 1996.

AP NFL Coach of the Year

Bold Denotes team won the Super Bowl/NFL Championship that season
Italic Denotes first year head coach of that team
* Denotes interim coach
Season Coach Team Record
2018 Matt Nagy Chicago Bears 12-4
2017 Sean McVay Los Angeles Rams 11-5
2016 Jason Garrett Dallas Cowboys 13-3
2015 Ron Rivera (2) Carolina Panthers 15-1
2014 Bruce Arians (2) Arizona Cardinals 11-5
2013 Ron Rivera Carolina Panthers 12-4
2012 Bruce Arians* Indianapolis Colts 11-5
2011 Jim Harbaugh San Francisco 49ers 13-3
2010 Bill Belichick (3) New England Patriots 14-2
2009 Marvin Lewis Cincinnati Bengals 10-6
2008 Mike Smith Atlanta Falcons 11-5
2007 Bill Belichick (2) New England Patriots 16-0
2006 Sean Payton New Orleans Saints 10-6
2005 Lovie Smith Chicago Bears 11-5
2004 Marty Schottenheimer San Diego Chargers 12-4
2003 Bill Belichick New England Patriots 14-2
2002 Andy Reid Philadelphia Eagles 12-4
2001 Dick Jauron Chicago Bears 13-3
2000 Jim Haslett New Orleans Saints 10-6
1999 Dick Vermeil St. Louis Rams 13-3
1998 Dan Reeves (2) Atlanta Falcons 14-2
1997 Jim Fassel New York Giants 10-5-1
1996 Dom Capers Carolina Panthers 12-4
1995 Ray Rhodes Philadelphia Eagles 10-6
1994 Bill Parcells (2) New England Patriots 10-6
1993 Dan Reeves New York Giants 11-5
1992 Bill Cowher Pittsburgh Steelers 11-5
1991 Wayne Fontes Detroit Lions 12-4
1990 Jimmy Johnson Dallas Cowboys 7-9
1989 Lindy Infante Green Bay Packers 10-6
1988 Mike Ditka (2) Chicago Bears 12-4
1987 Jim Mora New Orleans Saints 12-3
1986 Bill Parcells New York Giants 14-2
1985 Mike Ditka Chicago Bears 15-1
1984 Chuck Knox (3) Seattle Seahawks 12-4
1983 Joe Gibbs (2) Washington Redskins 14-2
1982 Joe Gibbs Washington Redskins 8-1
1981 Bill Walsh San Francisco 49ers 13-3
1980 Chuck Knox (2) Buffalo Bills 11-5
1979 Jack Pardee Washington Redskins 10-6
1978 Jack Patera Seattle Seahawks 9-7
1977 Red Miller Denver Broncos 12-2
1976 Forrest Gregg Cleveland Browns 9-5
1975 Ted Marchibroda Baltimore Colts 10-4
1974 Don Coryell St. Louis Cardinals 10-4
1973 Chuck Knox Los Angeles Rams 12-2
1972 Don Shula (4) Miami Dolphins 14-0
1971 George Allen (2) Washington Redskins 9-4-1
1970 Paul Brown Cincinnati Bengals 8-6
1969 Bud Grant Minnesota Vikings 12-2
1968 Don Shula (3) Baltimore Colts 13-1
1967 George Allen
Don Shula (2) (tie)
Los Angeles Rams
Baltimore Colts
11-1-2
11-1-2
1966 Tom Landry Dallas Cowboys 10-3-1
1965 George Halas (2) Chicago Bears 9-5
1964 Don Shula Baltimore Colts 12-2
1963 George Halas Chicago Bears 11-1-2
1962 Allie Sherman (2) New York Giants 12-2
1961 Allie Sherman New York Giants 10-3-1
1960 Buck Shaw Philadelphia Eagles 10-2
1959 Vince Lombardi Green Bay Packers 7-5
1958 Weeb Ewbank Baltimore Colts 9-3
1957 George Wilson Detroit Lions 8-4

Sporting News NFL Coach of the Year

Year NFL Coach Team
2018 Andy Reid (3) Kansas City Chiefs
2017 Sean McVay Los Angeles Rams
2016 Jason Garrett Dallas Cowboys
2015 Ron Rivera (2) Carolina Panthers
2014 Bruce Arians Arizona Cardinals
2013 Ron Rivera Carolina Panthers
2012 Mike Smith (3) Atlanta Falcons
2011 Jim Harbaugh San Francisco 49ers
2010 Mike Smith (2) Atlanta Falcons
2009 Sean Payton (2) New Orleans Saints
2008 Mike Smith Atlanta Falcons
2007 Bill Belichick (2) New England Patriots
2006 Sean Payton New Orleans Saints
2005 Tony Dungy Indianapolis Colts
2004 Bill Cowher (2) Pittsburgh Steelers
2003 Bill Belichick New England Patriots
2002 Andy Reid (2) Philadelphia Eagles
2001 Dick Jauron Chicago Bears
2000 Andy Reid Philadelphia Eagles
1999 Dick Vermeil (2) St. Louis Rams
1998 Dan Reeves (2) Atlanta Falcons
1997 Jim Fassel New York Giants
1996 Dom Capers Carolina Panthers
1995 Ray Rhodes Philadelphia Eagles
1994 George Seifert (2) San Francisco 49ers
1993 Dan Reeves New York Giants
1992 Bill Cowher Pittsburgh Steelers
1991 Joe Gibbs(3) Washington Redskins
1990 George Seifert San Francisco 49ers
1989 Lindy Infante Green Bay Packers
1988 Marv Levy Buffalo Bills
1987 Jim Mora New Orleans Saints
1986 Bill Parcells New York Giants
1985 Mike Ditka Chicago Bears
1984 Chuck Knox (3) Seattle Seahawks
1983 Joe Gibbs(2) Washington Redskins
1982 Joe Gibbs Washington Redskins
1981 Bill Walsh San Francisco 49ers
1980 Chuck Knox(2) Buffalo Bills
1979 Dick Vermeil Philadelphia Eagles
1978 Jack Patera Seattle Seahawks
1977 Red Miller Denver Broncos
1976 Chuck Fairbanks New England Patriots
1975 Ted Marchibroda Baltimore Colts
1974 Don Coryell St. Louis Cardinals
1973 Chuck Knox Los Angeles Rams
1972 Don Shula (4) Miami Dolphins
1971 George Allen (2) Washington Redskins
1970 Don Shula (3) Miami Dolphins
1969 Bud Grant Minnesota Vikings
1968 Don Shula (2) Baltimore Colts
1967 George Allen Los Angeles Rams
1966 Tom Landry Dallas Cowboys
1965 George Halas (2) Chicago Bears
1964 Don Shula Baltimore Colts
1963 George Halas Chicago Bears
1962 No Award
1961 Vince Lombardi Green Bay Packers
1960 No Award
1959 No Award
1958 No Award
1957 No Award
1956 Jim Lee Howell New York Giants
1955 Joe Kuharich Washington Redskins
1954 No Award
1953 Paul Brown (3) Cleveland Browns
1952 J. Hampton Pool Los Angeles Rams
1951 Paul Brown (2) Cleveland Browns
1950 Steve Owen New York Giants
1949 Paul Brown Cleveland Browns
1948 Greasy Neale Philadelphia Eagles
1947 Jimmy Conzelman Chicago Cardinals

Pro Football Weekly NFL Coach of the Year

Year NFL Coach[4] Team
2008 Tony Sparano Miami Dolphins
2007 Bill Belichick (2) New England Patriots
2006 Sean Payton New Orleans Saints
2005 Lovie Smith Chicago Bears
2004 Marty Schottenheimer San Diego Chargers
2003 Bill Belichick New England Patriots
2002 Andy Reid Philadelphia Eagles
2001 Dick Jauron Chicago Bears
2000 Jim Haslett New Orleans Saints
1999 Dick Vermeil St. Louis Rams
1998 Dan Reeves (2) Atlanta Falcons
1997 Jim Fassel New York Giants
1996 Dom Capers Carolina Panthers
1995 Ray Rhodes Philadelphia Eagles
1994 Bill Parcells (2) New England Patriots
1993 Dan Reeves New York Giants
1992 Bill Cowher Pittsburgh Steelers
1991 Wayne Fontes Detroit Lions
1990 Art Shell Los Angeles Raiders
1989 George Seifert San Francisco 49ers
1988 Mike Ditka Chicago Bears
1987 Jim Mora New Orleans Saints
1986 Bill Parcells New York Giants
1985 No Award -
1984 Dan Reeves Denver Broncos
1983 Joe Gibbs (2) Washington Redskins
1982 Joe Gibbs Washington Redskins
1981 Bill Walsh San Francisco 49ers
1980 Chuck Knox (2) Buffalo Bills
1979 Dick Vermeil Philadelphia Eagles
1978 Walt Michaels New York Jets
1977 Red Miller Denver Broncos
1976 Chuck Fairbanks New England Patriots
1975 Ted Marchibroda Baltimore Colts
1974 Don Coryell St. Louis Cardinals
1973 Chuck Knox Los Angeles Rams
1972 Don Shula (3) Miami Dolphins
1971 George Allen(2) Washington Redskins
1970 Don Shula (2) Miami Dolphins
1969 AFL – John Madden
NFL – Bud Grant
Oakland Raiders
Minnesota Vikings
1968 AFL – Hank Stram
NFL – Don Shula
Kansas City Chiefs
Baltimore Colts

Maxwell Football Club NFL Coach of the Year

Earle "Greasy" Neale Award
Given forProfessional Coach of the Year
CountryUnited States
Presented byMaxwell Football Club
History
First award1989
Most recentAndy Reid
WebsiteEarle "Greasy" Neale Award

Created in 1989 and presented by the Maxwell Football Club, the award is officially titled the Earle "Greasy" Neale Award for "Professional Coach of the Year".

Year AFC/NFC Coach Team
2018 Andy Reid Kansas City Chiefs
2017 Doug Pederson Philadelphia Eagles
2016 Jack Del Rio Oakland Raiders
2015 Ron Rivera Carolina Panthers
2014 Bruce Arians Arizona Cardinals
2013 Chip Kelly Philadelphia Eagles
2012 Chuck Pagano/Bruce Arians[5] Indianapolis Colts
2011 Mike McCarthy[6] Green Bay Packers
2010 Andy Reid Philadelphia Eagles
2009 Sean Payton New Orleans Saints
2008 Jeff Fisher Tennessee Titans
2007 Bill Belichick New England Patriots
2006 Sean Payton New Orleans Saints
2005 Tony Dungy Indianapolis Colts
2004 Marty Schottenheimer San Diego Chargers
2003 Dick Vermeil Kansas City Chiefs
2002 Andy Reid Philadelphia Eagles
2001 Dick Jauron Chicago Bears
2000 Andy Reid Philadelphia Eagles
1999 Dick Vermeil St. Louis Rams
1998 Dennis Green Minnesota Vikings
1997 Tony Dungy Tampa Bay Buccaneers
1996 Dom Capers Carolina Panthers
1995 Ray Rhodes Philadelphia Eagles
1994 Bill Parcells New England Patriots
1993 Dan Reeves New York Giants
1992 Bobby Ross San Diego Chargers
1991 Wayne Fontes Detroit Lions
1990 Art Shell[7] Los Angeles Raiders
1989 Chuck Noll Pittsburgh Steelers

Touchdown Club of Columbus NFL Coach of the Year

This award is officially called the Paul Brown Trophy.

Kansas City Committee of 101 AFC/NFC Coach of the Year Awards

See: Kansas City Committee of 101 Awards#Coach of the Year Awards (NFC and AFC) (since 1969)

UPI NFL Coach of the Year

Year AFC coach Team NFC coach Team
1996 Tom Coughlin Jacksonville Jaguars Dom Capers Carolina Panthers
1995 Marty Schottenheimer Kansas City Chiefs Ray Rhodes Philadelphia Eagles
1994 Bill Parcells New England Patriots Dave Wannstedt Chicago Bears
1993 Marv Levy Buffalo Bills Dan Reeves New York Giants
1992 Bobby Ross San Diego Chargers Dennis Green Minnesota Vikings
1991 Dan Reeves Denver Broncos Wayne Fontes Detroit Lions
1990 Art Shell Los Angeles Raiders Jimmy Johnson Dallas Cowboys
1989 Dan Reeves Denver Broncos Lindy Infante Green Bay Packers
1988 Marv Levy Buffalo Bills Mike Ditka Chicago Bears
1987 Ron Meyer Indianapolis Colts Jim Mora New Orleans Saints
1986 Marty Schottenheimer Cleveland Browns Bill Parcells New York Giants
1985 Raymond Berry New England Patriots Mike Ditka Chicago Bears
1984 Chuck Knox Seattle Seahawks Bill Walsh San Francisco 49ers
1983 Chuck Knox Seattle Seahawks John Robinson Los Angeles Rams
1982 Tom Flores Los Angeles Raiders Joe Gibbs Washington Redskins
1981 Forrest Gregg Cincinnati Bengals Bill Walsh San Francisco 49ers
1980 Sam Rutigliano Cleveland Browns Leeman Bennett Atlanta Falcons
1979 Sam Rutigliano Cleveland Browns Jack Pardee Washington Redskins
1978 Walt Michaels New York Jets Dick Vermeil Philadelphia Eagles
1977 Red Miller Denver Broncos Leeman Bennett Atlanta Falcons
1976 Chuck Fairbanks New England Patriots Jack Pardee Chicago Bears
1975 Ted Marchibroda Baltimore Colts Tom Landry[8] Dallas Cowboys
1974 Sid Gillman Houston Oilers Don Coryell St. Louis Cardinals
1973 John Ralston Denver Broncos Chuck Knox Los Angeles Rams
1972 Chuck Noll Pittsburgh Steelers Dan Devine Green Bay Packers
1971 Don Shula Miami Dolphins George Allen Washington Redskins
1970 Paul Brown Cincinnati Bengals Alex Webster New York Giants
Year AFL Coach Team NFL Coach Team
1969 Paul Brown Cincinnati Bengals Bud Grant Minnesota Vikings
1968 Hank Stram Kansas City Chiefs Don Shula Baltimore Colts
1967 John Rauch Oakland Raiders George Allen Los Angeles Rams
1966 Mike Holovak Boston Patriots Tom Landry[9] Dallas Cowboys
1965 Lou Saban Buffalo Bills George Halas[10] Chicago Bears
1964 Lou Saban Buffalo Bills Don Shula Baltimore Colts
1963 Al Davis Oakland Raiders George Halas[11] Chicago Bears
1962 Jack Faulkner Denver Broncos Allie Sherman New York Giants
1961 Wally Lemm Houston Oilers Allie Sherman New York Giants
1960 Lou Rymkus Houston Oilers Buck Shaw[12] Philadelphia Eagles
Year NFL Coach Team
1959 Vince Lombardi Green Bay Packers
1958 Weeb Ewbank[13] Baltimore Colts
1957 Paul Brown Cleveland Browns
1956 Buddy Parker Detroit Lions
1955 Joe Kuharich Washington Redskins

References

  1. ^ Dean, Jimmy (April 6, 1975). "Big Red's Coryell impresses Logan crowd". Southern Illinoisan. p. 11. Retrieved April 15, 2017 – via Newspapers.com. Coryell drew much praise from his peers this year by being named NFL Coach of the Year by the Associated Press, the Sporting News, United Press International and Pro Football Weekly.
  2. ^ "Hank Stram due here for WT coach clinic". The Canyon News. January 29, 1970. p. 11. Retrieved April 15, 2017 – via Newspapers.com. He has been named AFL coach of the year in 1966 (Associated Press and Washington Touchdown Club), 1968 (AP, Unit Press, Washington Touchdown Club, Pro Football Weekly), and 1969 (Washington Touchdown Club). The Rockne Football Club, picking from both the AFL and NFL, named him pro football coach of the year in 1961 and 1966.
  3. ^ "Chuck Knox Wins Juniata Alumni Achievement Award". Tyrone Daily Herald. April 12, 1974. p. 6. Retrieved April 15, 2017 – via Newspapers.com. He was named coach of the year by the AP, UPI, Pro Football Weekly, the Pro Football Writers Association and the Touchdown Club of Washington, D.C., among others.
  4. ^ SportsCity
  5. ^ "Maxwell Club Names Chuck Pagano and Bruce Arians Coach of the Year". Retrieved 5 November 2013.
  6. ^ Spofford, Mike (January 26, 2012). "McCarthy, Rodgers win Maxwell awards". Packers.com. Green Bay Packers, Inc. Retrieved 2012-04-07.
  7. ^ "Football Club Picks Shell as Coach of Year". Los Angeles Times. Associated Press. January 22, 1991. Retrieved February 16, 2017.
  8. ^ "Landry selected UPI Coach of Year". The Waxahachie Daily Light. United Press International. January 2, 1976. p. 4. Retrieved March 22, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  9. ^ Gergen, Joe (December 27, 1966). "Tom Landry Lands Coach Of Year Cup". The News-Herald. United Press International. p. 15. Retrieved March 22, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  10. ^ Block, Curt (December 19, 1965). "71 Year Old George Halas Named UPI Coach Of Year". The Herald-Journal. United Press International. p. 5. Retrieved March 21, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  11. ^ "Bears' George Halas Coach Of Year". The Delta Democrat-Times. United Press International. December 18, 1963. p. 9. Retrieved March 21, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  12. ^ "Buck Shaw Is Coach Of Year; Van Brocklin Also Honored". Daily Independent Journal. United Press International. December 23, 1960. p. 7. Retrieved March 11, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  13. ^ "Colt's Ewbank Coach of Year". Miami Daily News-Record. United Press International. January 6, 1959. p. 4. Retrieved March 9, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
1978 Seattle Seahawks season

The 1978 Seattle Seahawks season was the team's third season in the National Football League. The Seahawks won nine games, giving the franchise its first winning season. Coach Jack Patera won the National Football League Coach of the Year Award at seasons end.

Led by the third ranked offense, the team had some achievements. David Sims led the AFC in total touchdowns (TDs) – 15, including 14 rushing – and the team had 28 rushing TDs, number two in the league. Steve Largent made his first Pro Bowl with 71 receptions and 8 TDs. Quarterback Jim Zorn earned his sole All-Pro honor of his career by making the second team. The defense, however, lagged far behind ranking 26th.

Season highlights included defeating the Oakland Raiders twice and a last-second win over the Minnesota Vikings. Also a memorable game was a 20–17 loss in overtime to the Denver Broncos. Following an interception of a Jim Zorn pass off of a deflection, in overtime, the Broncos drove to the 1 yard line, but could not punch it in for a TD. Jim Turner missed an 18-yard field goal attempt, but the Seahawks were penalized for having 12 men on the field and the Broncos made the second kick. A 37–10 defeat in San Diego in week 15 eliminated the Seahawks from playoff contention, but a 23–19 win at home against Kansas City gave the team their first winning season.

1981 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1981 San Francisco 49ers season was their 32nd season in the National Football League. Under third-year head coach Bill Walsh, the team finished the regular season with a 13–3 record. The season would be one of the franchise's most successful seasons to that point and would be "the birth of a dynasty", when the 49ers began their decade of dominance. The 49ers drew an average home attendance of 54,398 in the 1981 NFL season.

The 49ers won Super Bowl XVI by defeating the AFC Champion Cincinnati Bengals. It was the first of five Super Bowl victories in franchise history, all within the next 13 seasons.

Quarterback Joe Montana began the 1981 season as San Francisco's starting quarterback. Montana produced two fourth-quarter comeback victories. Montana's signature game of the season was the NFC Championship Game, which culminated in "The Catch", a last-minute touchdown pass from Montana to Dwight Clark, propelling the 49ers to victory over Dallas, and a berth in their first Super Bowl.

1982 Washington Redskins season

The 1982 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 51st season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 46th in Washington, D.C.. Although the Redskins lost all their preseason games, they were to advance from an 8–8 record the previous season to become the only team in NFL History to win the Super Bowl after not winning a pre-season game. Only the 1990 Buffalo Bills and the 2000 New York Giants have since made it to the Super Bowl after a winless pre-season.The 1982 NFL season was shortened from sixteen games per team to nine because of a players’ strike. The NFL adopted a special 16-team playoff tournament; eight teams from each conference were seeded 1–8, and division standings were ignored. Washington had the best record in the NFC, and were the number one seed in the conference for the playoff tournament.

The Redskins marched through the NFC playoffs, beating each of their opponents by an average of 19 points. In a rematch of Washington's only prior Super Bowl appearance ten years prior, the Redskins – in a game famous for Washington's "70 Chip’ play on fourth-and-1 – went on to beat the Miami Dolphins 27–17 to win Super Bowl XVII. It was the Redskins’ first ever Super Bowl victory, and their first NFL Championship in 40 years. Combining the post-season and their first Super Bowl victory, the Redskins finished the season with an overall record of 12–1.

1983 Washington Redskins season

The 1983 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 52nd season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 47th in Washington, D.C.. The season began with the team trying to win consecutive Super Bowls, following their victory in Super Bowl XVII against the Miami Dolphins. Washington's 14–2 record was the best in the NFL. Though the Redskins did win their second-consecutive NFC Championship they were blown out by the Los Angeles Raiders in Super Bowl XVIII, 9–38.

The Redskins' 541 points scored and +209 point differential was the best in the league, with the 541 points setting an NFL record at the time. The 1983 Redskins also had a turnover margin of +43, an NFL record. Washington was the first team since the merger to record more than 60 takeaways (61).This season is cornerback Darrell Green's first in the league. He would spend the next 19 years with the team.

1986 New York Giants season

The 1986 New York Giants season was the franchise's 62nd season in the National Football League. The New York Giants, who play in the National Football Conference (NFC) of the National Football League (NFL), won their fifth championship—and first Super Bowl—in franchise history during the season. Led by consensus league Most Valuable Player (MVP) linebacker Lawrence Taylor and Super Bowl MVP quarterback Phil Simms, the Giants posted a 14–2 record during the regular season, tied for the best record in the league with the defending Super Bowl champion Chicago Bears and the best in team history. The Giants improved on their 10–6 record from 1985, won their first division championship since the NFL-AFL merger in 1970, and won Super Bowl XXI against the Denver Broncos.

In the playoffs the Giants, who were the top seed in the conference ahead of the Bears, defeated the San Francisco 49ers for the second consecutive year in the playoffs by a score of 49–3. They then disposed of their division rivals, the Washington Redskins, in the NFC Championship Game 17–0. In the Super Bowl, behind Simms' 88% pass completion percentage and their strong defense, the Giants overcame a 10–9 halftime deficit and scored thirty second half points while allowing only ten more and defeated the Broncos 39–20.

After making the playoffs in 1984 and 1985, the Giants entered the 1986 season as one of the favorites to win the Super Bowl. They began the season with 31–28 loss to the Dallas Cowboys, before winning five consecutive games. After losing 17–12 to the Seattle Seahawks in week seven, the Giants won their final nine regular season games. Following the regular season, coach Bill Parcells won the NFL Coach of the Year Award, and eight Giants were named to the Pro Bowl. The Giants' defense, nicknamed the Big Blue Wrecking Crew, finished second in the league in points and yards allowed.The 1986 Giants had been ranked as one of the greatest NFL teams of all time by fans, and members of the media. It was this Giants team that popularized the practice of the "Gatorade shower", which entailed the players dousing members of the coaching staff with Gatorade near the end of a victorious game.

1990 Dallas Cowboys season

The 1990 Dallas Cowboys season was the franchise's 31st season in the National Football League and was the second year of the franchise under the ownership of Jerry Jones and head coach Jimmy Johnson. The Cowboys rebounded from a 1–15 season in 1989 to a 7–9 record, however, missed the playoffs for the fifth consecutive season. Despite this, Jimmy Johnson won AP's NFL coach of the year honours.

Associated Press NFL Coach of the Year Award

The Associated Press National Football League Coach of the Year Award is presented annually by the Associated Press (AP) to the National Football League (NFL) coach adjudged to have had the most outstanding season. It has been awarded since the 1957 season. Since 2011, the winner has been announced at the annual NFL Honors ceremony held the day before the Super Bowl.

Don Shula has won the most AP NFL Coach of the Year awards, receiving four during his 33-year head coaching career: three with the Baltimore Colts and one with the Miami Dolphins. Chuck Knox and Bill Belichick have each been awarded three times. The incumbent AP NFL Coach of the Year is Matt Nagy, who led the Chicago Bears to the playoffs after a surprising turnaround, inheriting a team that went 5–11 the previous year and leading them to an 12–4 record and division title.

Best Coach/Manager ESPY Award

The Best Coach/Manager ESPY Award has been presented annually since 1993 to the head coach or manager of a team contesting play in a professional North American or collegiate sports league adjudged to be the best in a given calendar year.

Between 1993 and 2004, the award voting panel comprised variously fans; sportswriters and broadcasters, sports executives, and retired sportspersons, termed collectively experts; and ESPN personalities, but balloting thereafter has been exclusively by fans over the Internet from amongst choices selected by the ESPN Select Nominating Committee.

Through the 2001 iteration of the ESPY Awards, ceremonies were conducted in February of each year to honor achievements over the previous calendar year; awards presented thereafter are conferred in July and reflect performance from the June previous.

History of the Baltimore Colts

The Indianapolis Colts professional American football franchise was originally based in Baltimore, Maryland, as the Baltimore Colts from 1953 to 1984. The team was named for Baltimore's history of horse breeding and racing. It was the second incarnation of the Baltimore Colts, the first having played for three years in the All-America Football Conference and one in the National Football League (NFL). The 1953–83 Baltimore Colts team played its home games at Memorial Stadium.

Kansas City Committee of 101 awards

The Kansas City Committee of 101 was founded by Jack Wheeler. The name was chosen because the membership was limited to 101 Kansas City Chiefs fans and cost $1,000 annually (over $6,550 adjusted for inflation). The group began presenting its annual NFL awards in 1969. They started as NFL and AFL Awards. After the 1970 AFL-NFL merger, however, they have been awarded to the top AFC and NFC players and coaches. The "Committee of 101" is a national media committee of 101 sportswriters and sportscasters, who cover the NFL, and are asked to vote on the top offensive player, defensive player, and coach on each of the National Football League conferences, rather than the NFL as a whole.The annual NFL 101 Awards, is the nation's oldest awards event dedicated exclusively to professional football.The awards are handed out at an annual event in Kansas City, Missouri, and all proceeds from the 101 Awards benefit the Kansas City Chiefs Charities.

List of Arizona Cardinals seasons

This is a list of seasons completed by the Arizona Cardinals. The Cardinals are an American football franchise competing as a member of the West division of the National Football Conference (NFC) in the National Football League (NFL). The list documents the season-by-season records of the Cardinals' franchise from 1920 to present, including postseason records, and league awards for individual players or head coaches.

List of Indianapolis Colts seasons

The Indianapolis Colts, formerly the Baltimore Colts, are an American football team playing in the National Football League (NFL). This list documents the season-by-season records of the Colts franchise from 1953 to present, including postseason records and league awards for individual players or head coaches. In 1953, a Baltimore-based group led by Carroll Rosenbloom gained the rights to a new Baltimore franchise. Rosenbloom was granted an NFL team, and was awarded the holdings of the defunct Dallas Texans organization. The new team was named the Colts after the previous team that folded after the 1950 NFL season. After 31 seasons in Baltimore, Colts owner Robert Irsay moved the team to Indianapolis, Indiana.The Colts have won two Super Bowl championships (Super Bowl V and Super Bowl XLI). They also played in and lost Super Bowl III and Super Bowl XLIV. Before the AFL and NFL merged in 1970, they won three NFL Championships (1958, 1959, and 1968). By winning Super Bowl XLI the Colts became the first team that played its home games in a domed stadium to win a Super Bowl held in an outdoor stadium.After the Colts owner Jim Irsay hired Tony Dungy in 2002, the Colts made the playoffs for nine straight seasons. They won five straight AFC South titles from 2003 to 2007 and had seven consecutive seasons of 12 or more victories from 2003 to 2009, the first time that has been achieved in the NFL's 90-year history. Much of the team's success throughout the 2000s was attributed to the trio of general manager Bill Polian, coach Dungy, and quarterback Peyton Manning.In the 2013 season, the Colts secured their first division championship since Manning's departure and first under quarterback Andrew Luck and head coach Chuck Pagano.

List of New England Patriots seasons

The New England Patriots are an American football team based in Foxborough, Massachusetts. They compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's American Football Conference (AFC) East division. Originally called the Boston Patriots, the team was founded as one of eight charter members of the American Football League (AFL) in 1960 under the ownership of Billy Sullivan. The team became part of the NFL when the two leagues merged in 1970. The following year, they moved from Boston to nearby Foxborough, and changed their name to the New England Patriots.The modern NFL championship game, the Super Bowl, was founded in the 1966 season; the first four were contested between the champions of the AFL and the NFL. After the merger, the Super Bowl became the united league's championship. The Patriots made the 1963 AFL Championship Game, but struggled severely in the early years of the united league, not making the postseason until 1976. After a few good seasons including a Super Bowl appearance against a champion Bears outfit, the Patriots reached a nadir between 1989 and 1993 when they won only 19 of 80 games.

Since Bill Belichick was hired as the team's head coach in 2000, the Patriots have finished first or second in the AFC East every year except Belichick's first season, with both second-place finishes caused by tiebreakers. Over that time, they have won six Super Bowls, nine AFC Championship Games, and sixteen AFC East titles, while amassing a regular season record of 201–71. The team's quarterback over that same period, Tom Brady, has been awarded the NFL Most Valuable Player (MVP) three times, and the Super Bowl Most Valuable Player four times; he is one of only five players named Super Bowl MVP more than once, and the only one named 4 times.The Patriots have won six Super Bowl championships (XXXVI, XXXVIII, XXXIX, XLIX, LI, and LIII). They also played in and lost Super Bowls XX, XXXI, XLII, XLVI, and LII. During the 2007 regular season, the Patriots became the only NFL team in history to win 16 games, and the first since the 1972 Miami Dolphins (in a 14-game season) to complete the regular campaign undefeated. Belichick's Patriots are one of only two teams to win three Super Bowls in four years (the other being the Dallas Cowboys from 1993 to 1996).Overall, the Patriots have made 24 playoff appearances, one of which was before the merger. Since the merger, they have played fourteen AFC Championship Games, winning eleven of them to advance to the Super Bowl. In the Patriots' 56-year history, they have an overall regular season record of 476 wins, 383 losses, and 9 ties, plus an overall postseason record of 33 wins and 19 losses. In the 2018 NFL season, the Patriots reached their 11th Super Bowl, breaking their own record for most Super Bowl appearances by any organization of all time.

List of New York Giants seasons

The New York Giants are an American football team based in East Rutherford, New Jersey. They are a member of the National Football League (NFL) and play in the NFL's National Football Conference (NFC) East division. In 94 completed seasons, the franchise has won eight NFL championships, including four Super Bowl victories. The Giants have won more than 600 games and appeared in the NFL playoffs 32 times. Though the Giants play home games in East Rutherford, they draw fans from throughout the New York metropolitan area. In 2010, the team began playing in MetLife Stadium, formerly New Meadowlands Stadium.After Tim Mara paid $500 for the franchise, the Giants joined the NFL in the 1925 season and won their first championship two years later. In 1934, the team won its second title, defeating the Chicago Bears in the NFL Championship Game. The Giants won another championship four years later, and made four appearances in the NFL Championship Game from 1939 to 1946, losing each time. New York won its fourth NFL title in 1956, with a 47–7 win over the Bears in the championship game. From 1958 to 1963, the Giants reached the NFL Championship Game five times, but were defeated on each occasion. Following the 1963 season, the franchise did not return to the playoffs until 1981, only finishing .500 or better five times during the postseason drought.

Thirty years after the team's previous NFL title, the Giants were victorious in Super Bowl XXI, winning against the Denver Broncos 39–20 to end the 1986 season. The Giants won their second Super Bowl four years later, defeating the Buffalo Bills 20–19 in Super Bowl XXV. In the 2000 season, New York returned to the Super Bowl, but lost to the Baltimore Ravens 34–7. The 2007 season saw the Giants win their seventh NFL championship at Super Bowl XLII, where they defeated the previously unbeaten New England Patriots 17–14 in a game that is widely considered to be one of the biggest upsets in Super Bowl history. The Giants made four consecutive appearances in the playoffs from 2005 to 2008, before an 8–8 record in 2009 caused them to miss the postseason. After missing the playoffs in 2010, they defeated the Atlanta Falcons, Green Bay Packers, and San Francisco 49ers in the 2011 playoffs to reach Super Bowl XLVI, where they defeated the Patriots 21–17. In the most recent season, 2018, the Giants went 5–11 and did not qualify for the postseason.

Sean Payton

Patrick Sean Payton (born December 29, 1963) is an American football coach and former player who is the current head coach of the New Orleans Saints of the National Football League (NFL). Payton was a quarterback at Naperville Central High School and Eastern Illinois University and played professionally in 1987 and 1988. He began his coaching career as offensive assistant for San Diego State University and had several assistant coaching positions on college and NFL teams before being named as the tenth full-time coach in Saints history in 2006. Payton has always been known for his offensive prowess, having scored more points (2,804) and gained more yards (40,158) than any other team in a coach's first 100 games in NFL history.Under Payton's leadership, the Saints made the 2006 NFL playoffs after a 3–13 season in 2005 and advanced to their first NFC Championship appearance in franchise history, Payton won the AP NFL Coach of the Year Award because of this effort. Following the 2009 season, the Saints won their first Super Bowl championship in franchise history. Since joining the Saints as head coach he has helped guide the team to 3 NFC Championship games (2006, 2009, and 2018), an appearance in Super Bowl XLIV, and 7 total playoff births with 5 division titles. Making him the most successful coach in Saints franchise history.

On March 21, 2012, Payton was suspended for the entire 2012 NFL season, originally set to take effect April 1, 2012, as a result of his alleged involvement in the New Orleans Saints bounty scandal, under which "bounties" were allegedly paid for contact that would "knock out" targeted players on opposing teams. Payton has denied that any program encouraging Saints players to injure opposing players ever existed, even though the NFL claims their evidence proves otherwise. Assistant coach Joe Vitt stated "We had a pay to perform program, just like many NFL teams do, but there was never a bounty program, we didn't ever encourage a pay-to-injure program. That's just not true. We never crossed the line." Payton filed an appeal of his suspension with the league the Friday before it was set to take effect. On April 9, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell (who handed down the suspension) denied his appeal; his suspension began on April 16. Goodell reinstated Payton on January 22, 2013.Payton is under contract with the Saints at least until the end of the 2020 season. A previously agreed-upon extension of his contract through 2015 was voided by the NFL. This left his status after the 2012 season unclear until December of that year, when he agreed to a five-year contract that made him the highest paid coach in the history of the NFL. In March 2016, Payton signed a five-year extension with the Saints.

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