National Federation of State High School Associations

The National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) is the body that writes the rules of competition for most high school sports and activities in the United States. NFHS's headquarters are located in White River State Park in Indianapolis, Indiana.[2]

National Federation of State High School Associations
National Federation of State High School Associations logo
AbbreviationNFHS
Formation1920
Type501(c)(3) - Tax Exempt
Legal statusAssociation
PurposeAthletic/Educational
Headquarters690 W. Washington St.
Indianapolis, Indiana 46204, United States
Location
  • Indianapolis, Indiana
Region served
United States
Membership
18,500+ high schools
Official language
English
Executive Director
Dr. Karissa Niehoff
Staff
39[1]
Websitenfhs.org

Member and affiliate associations

Over 19,500 high schools belong to associations that are members of the NFHS. Most high schools, whether public or private, belong to their state's high school association; in turn, each state association belongs to the NFHS. However, in states that have separate associations for public and non-public high schools, only the public-school bodies are full NFHS members.

For example, the Texas University Interscholastic League (public schools, with non-public schools generally not allowed) is a full member; the largest association governing non-public schools, the Texas Association of Private and Parochial Schools, is an affiliate member, while other governing bodies are not NFHS members at any level. Similarly, the Virginia High School League, open only to public schools, is a full member, the state's largest association for non-public schools is an affiliate member, and other governing bodies are not members at all.

The case in Mississippi is slightly different; the body governing public schools is a full member, while the body governing private schools is not an NFHS member at any level. In the state of Alabama, the public schools and a handful of private schools compete in the AHSAA (Alabama High School Athletic Association) which is a full member of the NFHS. The majority of private schools in the state are members of the AISA (Alabama Independent School Association) a non-member that uses NFHS rules. The AHSAA will not allow its members to play AISA schools but the AISA schools do compete with public and private schools outside of Alabama.

NCAAHallofChampions 02
NFHS Headquarters, with the NCAA Hall of Champions in the background

Iowa has separate governing associations for boys' and girls' sports – the Iowa High School Athletic Association and the Iowa Girls High School Athletic Union. Only the Iowa High School Athletic Association is a full member of the NFHS; the girls' governing body is an affiliate member.

The provincial associations of Canada are affiliate members of the NFHS.

The NFHS publishes rules books for each sport or activity, and most states adopt those rules wholly for state high school competition including the non member private school associations.

The NFHS offered an online Coach Education Program in January 2007. It released a course, Fundamentals of Coaching. The NFHS has announced that it will offer a National Coach Certification in September 2009. This will enable to coaches to become a Level 1 - Accredited Interscholastic Coach issued by the NFHS.[3]

Member associations

Affiliate associations

Executive Directors

[55]

  • L. W. Smith, 1920–27 (secretary of the board)
  • C. W. Whitten, 1927–40 (manager, later executive secretary)
  • H. V. Porter, 1940–58 (executive secretary)
  • Clifford Fagan, 1958–77 (executive secretary)
  • Bruce B. Durbin, 1977–1993
  • Robert F. Kanaby, 1993–2010
  • Robert B. Gardner, 2010–2018
  • Karissa Niehoff, 2018-present[56]

NFHS National High School Hall of Fame

See also: U.S. high-school baseball awards and USA Today All-USA high school football team

Started in 1982, the National High School Hall of Fame[57] honors high-school athletes, coaches, officials, administrators, fine arts coaches/directors and others for their achievements and accomplishments in high-school sports and activity programs.[58][59]

See also

References, including organizations' official websites

  1. ^ "Staff". Nfhs.org. Retrieved 2018-03-13.
  2. ^ "NFHS: About Us". Archived from the original on January 31, 2011. Retrieved July 29, 2010.
  3. ^ Brown, Allison (September 24, 2009). "Three New Coach Education Courses Now Available". National Federation of State High School Associations. Retrieved April 25, 2011.
  4. ^ Alabama High School Athletic Association. AHSAA. Retrieved on 2013-08-12.
  5. ^ "Alaska School Activities Association". Asaa.org. 2018-03-03. Retrieved 2018-03-13.
  6. ^ AIA Online. AIA Online (2010-07-15). Retrieved on 2013-08-12.
  7. ^ Arkansas Activities Association - Arkansas High School Sports and Activities. Ahsaa.org. Retrieved on 2013-08-12.
  8. ^ California Interscholastic Federation. Cifstate.org. Retrieved on 2013-08-12.
  9. ^ Colorado High School Activities Association. CHSAA. Retrieved on 2013-08-12.
  10. ^ Welcome to www.casciac.org!!. Casciac.org (2013-04-01). Retrieved on 2013-08-12.
  11. ^ [1] Archived August 14, 2004, at the Wayback Machine
  12. ^ Florida High School Athletic Association. FHSAA.org. Retrieved on 2013-08-12.
  13. ^ Georgia High School Association. GHSA.net. Retrieved on 2013-08-12.
  14. ^ The Fast Track to Hawaii High School Sports - Hawaii High School Athletic Association (HHSAA). SportsHigh.com. Retrieved on 2013-08-12.
  15. ^ IHSAA - Home. Idhsaa.org. Retrieved on 2013-08-12.
  16. ^ "Illinois High School Association". Ihsa.org. Retrieved 2018-03-13.
  17. ^ Indiana High School Athletic Association, Inc. Ihsaa.org. Retrieved on 2013-08-12.
  18. ^ Iowa High School Athletic Association. Iahsaa.org. Retrieved on 2013-08-12.
  19. ^ KSHSAA. KSHSAA. Retrieved on 2013-08-12.
  20. ^ "Kentucky High School Athletic Association | KHSAA – Student-athletes of Today, Leaders of Tomorrow". Khsaa.org. Retrieved 2018-03-13.
  21. ^ "Louisiana High School Athletic Association". Lhsaa.org. 2017-12-13. Retrieved 2018-03-13.
  22. ^ Maine Principals Association, Interscholastic and Professional Support. Mpa.cc (2013-08-06). Retrieved on 2013-08-12.
  23. ^ "Maryland Public Secondary Schools Athletic Association - MPSSAA". www.mpssaa.org.
  24. ^ MIAA.net. MIAA.net. Retrieved on 2013-08-12.
  25. ^ "Michigan High School Athletic Association". Mhsaa.com. Retrieved 2018-03-13.
  26. ^ "Welcome to the Minnesota State High School League!". Mshsl.org. Retrieved 2018-03-13.
  27. ^ "Home | Mississippi High School Activities Association". Misshsaa.com. Retrieved 2018-03-13.
  28. ^ "Missouri State High School Activities Association". MSHSAA. Retrieved 2018-03-13.
  29. ^ "Montana High School Association". Mhsa.org. Retrieved 2018-03-13.
  30. ^ "Nebraska School Activities Association – NSAA". www.nsaahome.org.
  31. ^ "Nevada Interscholastic Activities Association". NIAA. Retrieved 2018-03-13.
  32. ^ "New Hampshire Interscholastic Athletic Association | NH Sports". NHIAA. Retrieved 2018-03-13.
  33. ^ "Welcome to The New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association". Njsiaa.org. 2018-01-01. Retrieved 2018-03-13.
  34. ^ "NMAA - New Mexico Activities Association - News, Results, Records". NMAA.
  35. ^ "New York State Public High School Athletic Association". Nysphsaa.org. Retrieved 2018-03-13.
  36. ^ "North Carolina High School Athletic Association". NCHSAA. Retrieved 2018-03-13.
  37. ^ "Welcome to NDHSAA". NDHSAA.com. Retrieved 2018-03-13.
  38. ^ "Ohio High School Athletic Association". Ohsaa.org. Retrieved 2018-03-13.
  39. ^ "OSSAA Home". Ossaa.com. Retrieved 2018-03-13.
  40. ^ "Home". OSAA. Retrieved 2018-03-13.
  41. ^ "Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association". PIAA. 2018-01-24. Retrieved 2018-03-13.
  42. ^ "Welcome!". RIIL.org. 1970-01-01. Retrieved 2018-03-13.
  43. ^ "SCHSL". SCHSL. Retrieved 2018-03-13.
  44. ^ "Home". SDHSAA. 2018-03-07. Retrieved 2018-03-13.
  45. ^ "TSSAA Home Page". Tssaa.org. Retrieved 2018-03-13.
  46. ^ [2] Archived February 21, 2006, at the Wayback Machine
  47. ^ http://www.uhsaa.org/
  48. ^ "Vermont Principals Association / Overview". Vpaonline.org. Retrieved 2018-03-13.
  49. ^ "Home - Virginia High School League". www.vhsl.org.
  50. ^ "Washington Interscholastic Activities Association". WIAA. Retrieved 2018-03-13.
  51. ^ "Welcome to the West Virginia Secondary Schools Activities Commission's Home Page". Wvssac.org. Retrieved 2018-03-13.
  52. ^ "Home | Wisconsin Interscholastic Athletic Association". Wiaawi.org. 2018-03-07. Retrieved 2018-03-13.
  53. ^ "Wyoming High School Activities Association". Whsaa.org. Retrieved 2018-03-13.
  54. ^ NFHS | National Federation of State High School Associations - Affiliate Associations Archived 2012-05-15 at the Wayback Machine
  55. ^ NFHS Handbook, 2017-18, p. 29.
  56. ^ https://www.nfhs.org/articles/dr-karissa-niehoff-of-connecticut-selected-nfhs-executive-director/
  57. ^ National High School Hall of Fame webpage. National Federation of State High School Associations website. Retrieved 2010-08-21.
  58. ^ Hall of Fame - Year by Year inductions Archived 2012-05-15 at the Wayback Machine (1982 to date). National High School Hall of Fame webpage. Retrieved 2010-08-21.
  59. ^ Hall of Fame - Inductions by State. National High School Hall of Fame webpage. Retrieved 2010-08-21.

Further reading

External links

A-11 offense

The A-11 offense is an offensive scheme that has been used in some levels of amateur American football. In this offense, a loophole in the rules governing kicking formations is used to disguise which offensive players would be eligible to receive a pass for any given play. It was designed by Kurt Bryan and Steve Humphries of Piedmont High School in California.

The scheme was used at the high school level for two seasons before the national governing body of high school football, the National Federation of State High School Associations, closed the scrimmage kick loophole in February 2009, effectively banning important facets of the offense. Due to rules regarding player numbering and eligible receivers, the scheme as originally designed is not usable at most levels of football, including the National Football League and college football.

The A-11 offense was to be the basis of the A-11 Football League (A11FL), a professional football league which was scheduled to play its first season in 2015. However, after announcing franchises names and scheduling "showcase games" in early 2014, the A11FL folded before taking the field.

Alabama High School Athletic Association

The Alabama High School Athletic Association (AHSAA), based in Montgomery, is the governing body for interscholastic athletics and activities programs for public schools in Alabama.

The AHSAA is a member National Federation of State High School Associations since 1924.

The AHSAA merged with the Alabama Interscholastic Athletic Association in 1968, forming one high school athletic association for the State of Alabama in accordance with a court order relating to athletics. The AIAA had previously governed athletics at segregated African-American schools.

The AHSAA sponsors state championships programs in 13 boys and 13 girls sports: Baseball, Softball, Basketball, Football, Cross Country, Soccer, Swimming and Diving, Track and Field, Tennis, Volleyball, Wrestling, Cheerleading and Indoor Track.

While the AHSAA is the primary sanctioning organization for high school sports in Alabama (and the only one allowed for public schools), it is not the only such organization. The Alabama Independent School Association sanctions athletics for approximately 40 private schools throughout the state. Other smaller organizations, such as the Alabama Christian Sports Conference and the Alabama Christian Athletic and Academic Association, sanction sports from smaller Christian schools and home schools, particularly in eight-man football.

The current executive director is Steve Savarese.

Alaska School Activities Association

The Alaska School Activities Association (ASAA) is the regulating body for high school interscholastic activities in Alaska and is Alaska's member to the National Federation of State High School Associations.

American Football Coaches Association

The American Football Coaches Association (AFCA) is an association of over 11,000 American football coaches and staff on all levels. According to its constitution, some of the main goals of the American Football Coaches Association are to "maintain the highest possible standards in football and the profession of coaching football," and to "provide a forum for the discussion and study of all matters pertaining to football and coaching." The AFCA, along with USA Today, is responsible for the Division I Football Bowl Subdivision Coaches Poll. The AFCA is also responsible for the Top 25 poll for Division II and Division III football.

The AFCA was founded in a meeting for 43 coaches at the Hotel Astor in New York City on Dec. 27, 1921. It is headquartered in Waco, Texas (the headquarters building is located across from Baylor University, formerly coached by AFCA executive director Grant Teaff).

The association has over 10,000 members and represents coaches at all levels including the National Collegiate Athletic Association, the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics, the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics, the National Junior College Athletic Association, the National Federation of State High School Associations, the National Football League, the Canadian Football League, USA Football, the National Football Foundation, College Football Hall of Fame, and Pop Warner Football. The AFCA is considered the primary professional association for football coaches at all levels of competition.

Another primary goal of the American Football Coaches Association is the promotion of safety. The association has established a code of ethics and has made many safety recommendations. An annual injury survey begun by the AFCA in the 1930s has provided valuable data and has led to a remarkable reduction of injuries in the sport down through the years. The NCAA Rules Committee often follows recommendations made by the AFCA.

Florida High School Athletic Association

The Florida High School Athletic Association (FHSAA) is an organization whose purpose is to organize sports competition for high schools in Florida. It is a member of the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS). Florida uses NFHS contest rules in its sports.

Georgia High School Association

The Georgia High School Association (GHSA) is an organization that governs athletics and activities for member high schools in Georgia, USA. GHSA is a member of the National Federation of State High School Associations. The association has 455 public and private high schools as members. GHSA organizes all sports and academic competitions as well as overseeing registration, training, and approves local area sports officials associations to administer regional athletics and activities per member schools.

Hawaii High School Athletic Association

Hawaii High School Athletic Association (HHSAA) is made up of 95 public and private high schools in the state of Hawaii. HHSAA was founded in 1956. It is a member of the National Federation of State High School Associations.

The HHSAA comprises schools from five leagues:

Big Island Interscholastic Federation

Interscholastic League of Honolulu

Kauai Interscholastic Federation

Maui Interscholastic League

Oahu Interscholastic AssociationThe HHSAA conducts state high school championships in the following sports: boys and girls air riflery, baseball, boys and girls basketball, boys and girls bowling, boys and girls and coed canoe paddling, cheerleading, boys and girls cross country, football, boys and girls golf, boys and girls judo, boys and girls soccer, softball, boys and girls swimming and diving, boys and girls tennis, boys and girls track and field, boys and girls volleyball, girls water polo, and boys and girls wrestling.

Maine Principals' Association

The Maine Principals’ Association (MPA) is the governing body for sports competitions among all public and some private high schools in the state of Maine. It is a member of the National Federation of State High School Associations. The MPA offices are located in Augusta.

Massachusetts Interscholastic Athletic Association

The Massachusetts Interscholastic Athletic Association (MIAA) is an organization that sponsors activities in thirty-three sports, comprising 374 public and private high schools in the U.S. state of Massachusetts. The MIAA is a member of the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS), which writes the rules for most U.S. high school sports and activities. The MIAA was founded in 1978, and was preceded by both the Massachusetts Secondary School Principals Association (MSSPA) (1942–1978) and the Massachusetts Interscholastic Athletic Council (MIAC) (1950–1978).

Notably, the MIAA does not use the NFHS ruleset for football, choosing instead to use NCAA college rules with minor modifications. It is the only state in which high school football is played in 11-minute quarters. The only other state association that plays high school football under NCAA rules, University Interscholastic League, uses the NFHS standard of 12-minute quarters.

Mississippi High School Activities Association

The Mississippi High School Activities Association (MHSAA) is the official sanctioning body of all public and some private junior high and high school academic and athletic competitions in the state of Mississippi. It is a non-profit organization and is headquartered in Clinton, Mississippi. The MHSAA is a member of the National Federation of State High School Associations.

New Hampshire Interscholastic Athletic Association

The New Hampshire Interscholastic Athletic Association (NHIAA) is the governing body for sports competitions among all public and some private high schools in New Hampshire. It is a member of the National Federation of State High School Associations.

New Mexico Activities Association

The New Mexico Activities Association (NMAA) is a nonprofit organization that regulates interscholastic programs for junior and senior high schools in New Mexico. It hosts the statewide sports championship games each year.

New York State Public High School Athletic Association

The New York State Public High School Athletic Association (NYSPHSAA) is the governing body of interscholastic sports for most public schools in New York outside New York City. The organization was created in 1923, after a predecessor organization called the New York State Public High School Association of Basketball Leagues began in 1921 to bring consistency to eligibility rules and to conduct state tournaments. It consists of 768 member high schools from the state divided into 11 numbered sections. It is a member of the National Federation of State High School Associations as well as the New York State Federation of Secondary School Athletic Associations.

Oklahoma Secondary School Activities Association

The Oklahoma Secondary School Activities Association (OSSAA), is an organization which organizes secondary school athletics and activities competitions at the state level. Derald Glover is its president. The OSSAA is a member of the National Federation of State High School Associations. 482 public and private schools are members of the OSSAA.

Ontario Federation of School Athletic Associations

The Ontario Federation of School Athletic Associations (OFSAA) is an organization of student-athletes, teacher-coaches, student-coaches, teachers, principals, and sport administrators in Ontario, Canada. OFSAA is the second largest high school athletic association in North America, second only to the California Interscholastic Federation.

Approximately 270,000 students and 16,000 teacher-coaches participate in school sport in Ontario. Every individual who is involved in school sport is a member of OFSAA. The group's primary responsibility is to work with volunteer teacher-coaches to provide provincial championships for Ontario's student-athletes, and also deal with issues that affect students, coaches, schools and communities, such as drug-free sport, equity, fair play, and safe schools.

As with all of Canada's provincial high school athletics associations, the OFSAA is an affiliate member of the United States-based National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS).

Scholastic wrestling

Scholastic wrestling, sometimes known in the United States as folkstyle wrestling, is a style of amateur wrestling practiced at the high school and middle school levels in the United States. This wrestling style is essentially collegiate wrestling with some slight modifications. It is practiced in 49 of the 50 states in the United States. When practiced by wrestling clubs of younger participants, scholastic wrestling is better known as "folkstyle".

According to an athletics participation survey taken by the National Federation of State High School Associations, boys' wrestling ranked eighth in terms of the number of schools sponsoring teams, with 9,445 schools participating in the 2006-07 school year. Also, 257,246 boys participated in the sport during that school year, making scholastic wrestling the sixth most popular sport among high school boys. In addition, 5,408 girls participated in wrestling in 1,227 schools during the 2006-07 season. Scholastic wrestling is currently practiced in 49 of the 50 states; only Mississippi does not officially sanction scholastic wrestling for high schools and middle schools. Arkansas, the 49th state to sanction high school wrestling, began scholastic wrestling competition in the 2008-09 season with over forty schools participating. Shortly after, Ocean Springs High School became the first school in Mississippi to have a high school team.

South Dakota High School Activities Association

South Dakota High School Activities Association governs high school sports and other activities in the state of South Dakota. The SDHSAA was founded in 1905 and has been a member of the National Federation of State High School Associations since 1923.

Utah High School Activities Association

The Utah High School Activities Association (UHSAA) is an organization of 138 high schools in the U.S. state of Utah that sponsor athletic activities in 25 sports and activities. More than 85,000 students compete annually in approximately 25,000 competitions among UHSAA member schools. The UHSAA is a member of the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS).

Vermont Principals' Association

The Vermont Principals' Association (VPA) is an organization of over 300 schools in the U.S. state of Vermont that sponsor activities in numerous sports and activities. The VPA is a member of the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS), which writes the rules for most U.S. high school sports and activities.

National Federation of State High School Associations

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