Nate Borden

Nathaniel Borden (September 22, 1932 – September 30, 1992) was a professional American football defensive end in the National Football League (NFL) for the Green Bay Packers and Dallas Cowboys. He also was a member of the Buffalo Bills in the American Football League (AFL). He played college football at Indiana University.

Nate Borden
No. 87, 75
Position:Defensive end
Personal information
Born:September 22, 1932
Detroit, Michigan
Died:September 30, 1992 (aged 60)
Las Vegas, Nevada
Height:6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Weight:234 lb (106 kg)
Career information
High school:Jersey City (NJ) Dickinson
College:Indiana
NFL Draft:1955 / Round: 25 / Pick: 293
Career history
 * Offseason and/or practice squad member only
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:92
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Early years

Borden attended Abraham Lncoln High School, where he was an All-state fullback and tackle. He also practiced the discus throw, the shot put and the two-mile run.

He accepted a scholarship from Indiana University. As a freshman, he played at defensive tackle. He played as a defensive end in his next two years. As a senior, he was moved back to defensive tackle.[1] He never missed a game, playing in 36 straight contests.

Professional career

Green Bay Packers

Borden was selected by the Green Bay Packers in the 25th round (293rd overall) of the 1955 NFL Draft. Under head coach Lisle Blackbourn, he became the first African-American to play for the franchise.

During this early period, Borden was one of the few African-American players on the Packers along with Frank Purnell, who played in 1957. When he could not find housing within the city limits, he had to room at a rundown motel just outside Green Bay. A number of Packers were also staying at the motel. They told the manager he would lose their business if Borden could not room there. Quarterback Bart Starr befriended Borden and frequently had him and his family at Starr's home for dinner.

He was a starter at defensive end during four straight seasons. When Vince Lombardi was hired as the new head coach for the 1959 season, Borden was the only African-American player on the roster and Lombardi had to assist him in finding a decent place to live. He wasn't protected for the NFL Expansion Draft due to a knee injury.

Dallas Cowboys

Borden was selected by the Dallas Cowboys in the 1960 NFL Expansion Draft and became the first starter at left defensive end in franchise history, registering 48 tackles.[2] The next year, he was switched to the right side, after John Gonzaga was traded and Bob Lilly was drafted. He was released on September 11, 1962.

Buffalo Bills

In 1962, he was signed by the Buffalo Bills of the American Football League. He played in three games before an ankle injury sidelined him for the rest of the season. He was cut in 1963.

Toronto Argonauts

On July 15, 1963, he signed with the Toronto Argonauts of the Canadian Football League. He was released on July 26.

Personal life

In 1961, he was a college scout for the Dallas Cowboys during the offseason. In 1965, he was hired to scout for the United Scouting organization of the NFL, before beig hired by the Green Bay Packers for the same role.[3] In 1967, he was hired as a scout by the Atlanta Falcons.[4] In 1973, he took a job as a part time scout for the Cincinnati Bengals. In 1974, he was hired as a fulltime scout with the World Football League.

After finishing his scouting years, Borden became the assistant to the mayor of Jersey City, Jim Sutcliffe. After Sutcliffe lost a bid for re-election, Borden moved to Las Vegas, where he was assistant to the mayor Russ Dorn. He was also the Officer of Urban Development in the city of Las Vegas.

Borden died of cancer in Las Vegas on September 30, 1992. He left behind two sons and a daughter.

References

  1. ^ "All American Teams". Retrieved February 3, 2018.
  2. ^ "Former Packers Will Start Sunday Against Green Bay". Retrieved February 3, 2018.
  3. ^ "Borden to Scout for Pro Teams". Retrieved February 3, 2018.
  4. ^ "Borden Named Grid Scout For Atlanta". Retrieved February 3, 2018.

External links

1954 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1954 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Ten Conference teams for the 1954 Big Ten Conference football season.

1954 Indiana Hoosiers football team

The 1954 Indiana Hoosiers football team represented the Indiana Hoosiers in the 1954 Big Ten Conference football season. The Hoosiers played their home games at Memorial Stadium in Bloomington, Indiana. The team was coached by Bernie Crimmins, in his third year as head coach of the Hoosiers.

1955 Green Bay Packers season

The 1955 Green Bay Packers season was their 37th season overall and their 35th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 6–6 record under coach Lisle Blackbourn, earning them a third-place finish in the Western Conference.

1955 NFL Draft

The 1955 National Football League draft was held January 27–28, 1955 at the Warwick Hotel in New York City.

1956 Green Bay Packers season

The 1956 Green Bay Packers season was their 38th season overall and their 36th in the National Football League. The club posted a 4–8 record under coach Lisle Blackbourn, earning them a fifth-place finish in the Western Conference.

1957 Green Bay Packers season

The 1957 Green Bay Packers season was their 39th season overall and their 37th season in the National Football League. After an opening win, the club posted a 3–9 record under fourth-year head coach Lisle Blackbourn and finished last in the Western Conference. It was Blackbourn's final season at Green Bay, who was replaced by Ray McLean in January 1958 for just one year, succeeded by Vince Lombardi in 1959.

The 1957 season also marked the Packers' move from City Stadium to new City Stadium, which was opened with a win over the Chicago Bears in week one on September 29. It was renamed Lambeau Field in August 1965 in memory of Packers founder, player, and long-time head coach, Curly Lambeau, who had died two months earlier.

1958 Green Bay Packers season

The 1958 Green Bay Packers season was their 40th season overall and their 38th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 1–10–1 record under first-year head coach Ray McLean for a last-place finish in the league in 1958 and the worst record ever posted by a Packers team.

In the immortal words of New York sportswriter and Green Bay native Red Smith: "they overwhelmed one opponent, under-whelmed ten, and whelmed one." The tie came in week two and the three-point win in week five; during the seven-game losing streak to end the season the Packers lost by an average margin of over 22 points and got no closer than ten. The Packers finished 1958 allowing a league-worst 382 points in the 12-game season (31.8 points per game).

McLean was the top assistant on the coaching staff in 1957 and was given a one-year contract as head coach after Lisle Blackbourn was fired in early January 1958 with a year remaining ($25,000) on a five-year contract. Following the final game of the 1958 season, McLean resigned on December 17, which paved the way for the historic hiring of Vince Lombardi in January 1959.The underachieving 1958 team was loaded with talent, with future hall of famers Bart Starr, Paul Hornung, Jim Taylor, Ray Nitschke, Jim Ringo, Forrest Gregg, and Jerry Kramer, as well as future All-Pros Ron Kramer, Max McGee, Bill Forester, and Dan Currie.

1959 Green Bay Packers season

The 1959 Green Bay Packers season was their 41st season overall and their 39th season in the National Football League and 41st overall. The club posted a 7–5 record in the 1959 season under first-year coach Vince Lombardi to earn a third-place finish in the Western Conference.

It was the Packers' first winning season in a dozen years, the last was a 6–5–1 mark in 1947. Green Bay had just one victory during the previous season in 1958 with the worst record in the 12-team league, and were 3–9 in 1957, tied for worst.

1960 Dallas Cowboys season

The 1960 Dallas Cowboys season was the inaugural season for the franchise in the National Football League (NFL). The team finished with no wins, 11 losses, and 1 tie, which placed them last in the Western Conference, and was the worst record in the NFL for that season, worse than Dallas' previous entry into the NFL, the Dallas Texans (who finished 1–11 in their lone season in 1952, then relocated to Baltimore as the Colts).

1960 NFL expansion draft

The 1960 NFL expansion draft was the first National Football League (NFL) draft in which a new expansion team, named the Dallas Rangers, selected its initial players. The NFL awarded Dallas, Texas a franchise to compete for revenue with Lamar Hunt's Dallas Texans of the upstart American Football League. The Dallas expansion franchise was approved too late for it to participate in the 1960 NFL draft which had been held on November 30, 1959. Dallas is the only NFL expansion team to not have had the benefit of a college draft in its first year.So that the Rangers (Cowboys) could become competitive with existing teams, the league gave them the opportunity to select current players from existing teams. That selection was provided by the expansion draft, held on March 13, 1960. In this draft, the Rangers chose 36 players from the existing 12 teams. The NFL also assigned the rights to 1960 NFL draft picks Don Meredith (who had been drafted by the Chicago Bears) and Don Perkins (drafted by the Baltimore Colts) to the Cowboys for a couple of future draft picks.22 players made the active roster that season. 11 players played only one year with Dallas. Eight players (including Jack Patera, who was injured early in the 1961 season) played in 1960 and 1961. The three remaining players from the draft started for several years, including: Bob Fry, Tackle, 1960–64; Jerry Tubbs, Linebacker, 1960–66; and Frank Clarke, Wide Receiver, 1960–67.On March 19, 1960, the Rangers renamed themselves the Cowboys.

1961 Dallas Cowboys season

The 1961 Dallas Cowboys season was their second in the National Football League. The team finished with 4 wins, 9 losses, and 1 tie, placing them 6th in the Eastern Conference.

1962 Buffalo Bills season

The 1962 Buffalo Bills season was the team’s third season in the American Football League. The Bills finished the season with a 7–6–1 record, third place in the AFL East; it was the Bills' first-ever season finishing with a winning record.

The Bills lost their first five games of the season, but finished the final nine games with only one loss (and one tie).

George Andrie

George Joseph Andrie (April 20, 1940 – August 21, 2018) was an American professional football defensive end in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys. Prior to his professional career he played college football at Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, which dropped its program after his junior season.

List of American Football League players

The following is a list of men who played for the American Football League (AFL, 1960–1969).

List of Buffalo Bills players

This is a list of American football players who have played for the Buffalo Bills of the American Football League (AFL) and the National Football League (NFL). It includes players that have played at least one official game in an AFL or NFL regular season. The Buffalo Bills franchise was founded in the AFL in the 1960 and joined the NFL in 1970. The Bills played for three AFL Championships and won two. They have also had four Super Bowl appearances, but have yet to win one.

List of Dallas Cowboys players

This is a complete list of American football players who have played for the Dallas Cowboys of the National Football League (NFL). It includes players that have played at least one game in the NFL regular season. The Dallas Cowboys franchise was founded in 1960 as an expansion team. The team has earned the most postseason appearances (28, which includes another league record of 54 postseason games, winning 32 of them), the most appearances in the NFC Championship Game (14), and the 2nd most Super Bowl appearances (8). The Cowboys have played for 10 NFL Championships and have won five, all five being Super Bowls.

Nathaniel Borden

Nathaniel Borden may refer to:

Nate Borden (1932–1992), American footballer

Nathaniel B. Borden 1801–1865, U.S. politician

William L. Dickinson High School

William L. Dickinson High School is a four-year comprehensive community public high school located in Jersey City, Hudson County, New Jersey, United States, serving students in ninth through twelfth grades as part of the Jersey City Public Schools. Dickinson occupies a prominent location on Bergen Hill overlooking lower Jersey City and the New York Harbor. The school has been accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Secondary Schools since 1929.As of the 2015-16 school year, the school had an enrollment of 1,994 students and 163.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.2:1. There were 1,429 students (71.7% of enrollment) eligible for free lunch and 98 (4.9% of students) eligible for reduced-cost lunch.

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