Nancy Kress

Nancy Anne Kress (born January 20, 1948) is an American science fiction writer.[1] She began writing in 1976 but has achieved her greatest notice since the publication of her Hugo and Nebula-winning 1991 novella Beggars in Spain, which she later expanded into a novel with the same title. She has also won the Nebula Award for Best Novella in 2013 for After the Fall, Before the Fall, During the Fall,[2] and in 2015 for Yesterday's Kin.

In addition to her novels, Kress has written numerous short stories and is a regular columnist for Writer's Digest. She is a regular at Clarion writing workshops.[3] During the Winter of 2008/09, Nancy Kress was the Picador Guest Professor for Literature at the University of Leipzig's Institute for American Studies in Leipzig, Germany.[4]

Nancy Kress
Kress (center), with Delia Sherman (left) and Ellen Datlow in 2007
Kress (center), with Delia Sherman (left) and Ellen Datlow in 2007
BornNancy Anne Koningisor
January 20, 1948 (age 71)
Buffalo, New York, US
Pen nameAnna Kendall
OccupationFiction writer
NationalityAmerican
Period1976–present
Genre
Science fiction
  • Fantasy (as Kendall)[1]
Spouse
Website
nancykress.com

Biography

Born Nancy Anne Koningisor in Buffalo, New York and grown up in East Aurora, she attended college at SUNY Plattsburgh and graduated with an M.A. in English.[5] Before starting her writing career she taught elementary school and then college English. In 1973, she moved to Rochester to marry Michael Joseph Kress. They had two sons, and divorced in 1984. At that time, she went to work at Stanton and Hucko, an advertising agency. In 1998, she married fellow author Charles Sheffield, who died in 2002 of a brain tumor. Kress moved back to Rochester, New York, to be near her grown children.[3] She recently (2009) moved to Seattle.[6] In February 2011 she married author Jack Skillingstead.[7][8]

Work

Kress tends to write technically realistic hard science fiction stories, often set in a fairly near future. Her fiction often involves genetic engineering, and, to a lesser degree, artificial intelligence. There are many technologies shared between stories, including "genemod" to refer to genetic engineering, and foamcast, a lightweight and sturdy building material that appears in many of her novels and short stories. By conducting extensive research she keeps her topics within the realm of possibility; however, as Kress clarified for one Locus (magazine) interviewer, "[Sheffield] pronounces it science fiction, and I pronounce it science fiction."[8] She loves ballet, and has written stories around it.

Awards

  • Nebula Awards
    • Best Short Story winner (1986): "Out of All Them Bright Stars", F&SF March 1985
    • Best Novella (1991): Beggars in Spain (Axolotl Press / Pulphouse Feb. 1991) / Asimov's April 1991
    • Best Novelette (1998): "The Flowers of Aulit Prison", Asimov's Oct./Nov. 1996
    • Best Novella (2007): "Fountain of Age", Asimov's July 2007
    • Best Novella (2012): "After the Fall, Before the Fall, During the Fall", Tachyon Publications
    • Best Novella (2014): "Yesterday's Kin", Tachyon Publications
  • Hugo Award
    • Best Novella (1992): Beggars in Spain (Axolotl Press / Pulphouse Feb. 1991) / Asimov's April 1991
    • Best Novella (2009): "The Erdmann Nexus", Asimov's Oct./Nov. 2008
  • John W. Campbell Memorial Award
    • Best Novel (2003): Probability Space, (Tor Sep. 2002)
  • Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award
    • Best Short Science Fiction (1997): "The Flowers of Aulit Prison", Asimov's Oct./Nov. 1996

References

  1. ^ a b c Clute, John (29 June 2015). "Kress, Nancy". The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction. Retrieved 20 July 2015.
  2. ^ "2012 Nebula Award Winners". Locus Online. 18 May 2013. Retrieved 21 July 2015.
  3. ^ a b "Nancy Kress Home Page". Nancy Kress. 2005. Archived from the original on 2008-05-16. Retrieved 2008-09-14.
  4. ^ "The Picador Guest Professorship for Literature". American Studies: Leipzig. 2015. Retrieved 21 July 2015.
  5. ^ A Conversation With Nancy Kress, retrieved 11 October 2015
  6. ^ David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer (2010). Year's Best SF15. Eos Books. p. 119.
  7. ^ Kress, Nancy (11 February 2011). "Las Vegas". Nancy's Blog. Retrieved 21 July 2015.
  8. ^ a b Evens, Arthur (2010). The Wesleyan Anthology of Science Fiction. Wesleyan University Press. p. 580.

External links

Beggars in Spain

Beggars in Spain is a 1993 science fiction novel by American writer Nancy Kress. It was originally published as a novella with the same title in Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine and as a limited edition paperback by Axolotl Press in 1991. Kress expanded it, adding three additional parts to the novel, and eventually two sequels, Beggars and Choosers (1994) and Beggars Ride (1996). It is held to be an important work, and is often hailed for its predictions of emerging technologies and society.The original novella won the Hugo Award and Nebula Award. The novel was also nominated for both the Hugo Award and the Nebula Award, but did not win.

Burn (novella)

"Burn" is a science fiction novella published in 2005 by James Patrick Kelly. It won the 2007 Nebula Award for Best Novella.

Every Heart a Doorway

Every Heart a Doorway is a novella by Seanan McGuire, the first in her "Wayward Children" series. It was first published in hardcover and ebook editions by Tor.com in April, 2016.

Fountain of Age

"Fountain of Age" is a science fiction novella published in 2007 by Nancy Kress. It won the 2008 Nebula Award for Best Novella and was nominated for the 2008 Hugo Award for Best Novella.

Golden Gryphon Press

Golden Gryphon Press is an independent publishing company, specializing in science fiction, fantasy, dark fantasy and cross-genre novels. It was founded in 1996 by Jim Turner, former editor at Arkham House, and is currently run by his brother Gary and his wife, Geri Turner.

The company has published work by Robert Reed, Michael Bishop, Andy Duncan, Geoffrey A. Landis, Paul Di Filippo, James Patrick Kelly, Lucius Shepard, Charles Stross, Gregory Frost, Nancy Kress, George Alec Effinger, Warren Rochelle, Jeffrey Ford and Howard Waldrop.

Hugo Award for Best Novella

The Hugo Award for Best Novella is one of the Hugo Awards given each year for science fiction or fantasy stories published or translated into English during the previous calendar year. The novella award is available for works of fiction of between 17,500 and 40,000 words; awards are also given out in the short story, novelette and novel categories. The Hugo Awards have been described as "a fine showcase for speculative fiction" and "the best known literary award for science fiction writing".The Hugo Award for Best Novella has been awarded annually since 1968. In addition to the regular Hugo awards, beginning in 1996 Retrospective Hugo Awards, or "Retro Hugos", have been available to be awarded for years 50, 75, or 100 years prior in which no awards were given. Retro Hugos may only be awarded for years in which a World Science Fiction Convention, or Worldcon, was hosted, but no awards were originally given. To date, Retro Hugo awards have been given for novellas for 1939, 1941, 1943, 1946, 1951, and 1954.Hugo Award nominees and winners are chosen by the supporting and attending members of the annual World Science Fiction Convention, or Worldcon, and the presentation evening constitutes its central event. The selection process is defined in the World Science Fiction Society Constitution as instant-runoff voting with six nominees, except in the case of a tie. These novellas on the ballot are the six most-nominated by members that year, with no limit on the number of stories that can be nominated. Initial nominations are made by members in January through March, while voting on the ballot of six nominations is performed roughly in April through July, subject to change depending on when that year's Worldcon is held. Prior to 2017, the final ballot was five works; it was changed that year to six, with each initial nominator limited to five nominations. Worldcons are generally held near the start of September, and are held in a different city around the world each year. Members are permitted to vote "no award", if they feel that none of the nominees is deserving of the award that year, and in the case that "no award" takes the majority the Hugo is not given in that category. This happened in the Best Novella category in 2015.During the 57 nomination years, 161 authors have had works nominated; 41 of these have won, including coauthors and Retro Hugos. Connie Willis has received the most Hugos for Best Novella at four, and at eight is tied for the most nominations with Robert Silverberg. Willis and Charles Stross at three out of four nominations are the only authors to have won more than twice, while thirteen other authors have won the award twice. Nancy Kress has earned seven nominations and Robert A. Heinlein, George R. R. Martin, Kim Stanley Robinson, and Lucius Shepard six, and are the only authors besides Willis and Silverberg to get more than four. Robinson has the highest number of nominations without winning.

Inertia (short story)

"Inertia" is a science fiction short story written by Nancy Kress. It was first published in Analog Science Fiction and Fact, in January 1990, and was subsequently republished in The Year's Best Science Fiction: Eighth Annual Collection (1991), in Best New SF 5 (1991), in The Aliens of Earth (1993), in A Woman's Liberation: A Choice of Futures by and About Women (2001), and in Wastelands: Stories of the Apocalypse (2008). It describes life in a "disease colony"; Kress has stated that the story was inspired directly by cultural reactions to the AIDS pandemic, and that it is "less about disease than about love."

John W. Campbell Memorial Award for Best Science Fiction Novel

The John W. Campbell Memorial Award for Best Science Fiction Novel, or Campbell Memorial Award, is an annual award presented by the Center for the Study of Science Fiction at the University of Kansas to the author of the best science fiction novel published in English in the preceding calendar year. It is the novel counterpart of the Theodore Sturgeon Award for best short story, awarded by the same organization. The award is named in honor of John W. Campbell (1910–71), whose science fiction writing and role as editor of Analog Science Fiction and Fact made him one of the most influential editors in the early history of science fiction. The award was established in 1973 by writers and critics Harry Harrison and Brian Aldiss "as a way of continuing his efforts to encourage writers to produce their best possible work." Locus magazine has listed it as one of the "major awards" of written science fiction.The winning novel is selected by a panel of science fiction experts, intended to be "small enough to discuss among its members all of the nominated novels". Among members of the panel have been Gregory Benford, Paul A. Carter, James Gunn, Elizabeth Anne Hull, Christopher McKitterick, Farah Mendlesohn, Pamela Sargent, and Tom Shippey. In 2008 Mendlesohn was replaced with Paul Kincaid, in 2009 Carter left the panel while Paul Di Filippo and Sheila Finch joined, and Lisa Yaszek replaced Di Filippo in 2016. Nominations are submitted by publishers and jurors, and are collated by the panel into a list of finalists to be voted on. The minimum eligible length that a work may be is not formally defined by the center. The winner is selected by May of each year, and is presented at the Campbell Conference awards banquet in June at the University of Kansas in Lawrence as part of the centerpiece of the conference along with the Sturgeon Award. The award has been given at the conference since 1979; prior to then it was awarded at various locations around the world, starting at the Illinois Institute of Technology in 1973. Winners are always invited to attend the ceremony. The Center for the Study of Science Fiction maintains a trophy which records all of the winners on engraved plaques affixed to the sides, and since 2004 winners have received a smaller personalized trophy as well.During the 46 years the award has been active, 176 authors have had works nominated; 46 of these authors have won. In two years, 1976 and 1994, the panel selected none of the nominees as a winner, while in 1974, 2002, 2009, and 2012 the panel selected two winners rather than one. Frederik Pohl and Joan Slonczewski have each won twice, the only authors to do so, out of four and two nominations, respectively. Kim Stanley Robinson and Paul J. McAuley have won once out of seven nominations, and Jack McDevitt, Adam Roberts, and Robert J. Sawyer have won once out of five nominations, while Nancy Kress, Bruce Sterling, and Robert Charles Wilson have won once out of four nominations. Greg Bear has the most nominations without winning at nine, followed by Sheri S. Tepper at six, James K. Morrow at five, and William Gibson, Ken MacLeod, and Charles Stross at four.

Kevin Baker

Kevin Baker may refer to:

Kevin Baker (author) (born 1958), American novelist and journalist

Kevin Baker (ice hockey) (born 1979), Canadian ice hockey player

Kevin Baker, character in the 1993 science fiction novel Beggars in Spain by Nancy Kress

Liavek

Liavek is a series of five fantasy anthologies edited by Emma Bull and Will Shetterly set in a shared world.

Orson Scott Card found the initial volume to be "an example of what can be accomplished [in a shared-world project] when almost everything goes right."The collections were published by Ace Books with contributors including Bull, Shetterly, Gene Wolfe, Jane Yolen, John M. Ford, Kara Dalkey, Barry B. Longyear, Megan Lindholm, Nancy Kress, Patricia C. Wrede, Steven Brust, Nate Bucklin, Pamela Dean, Gregory Frost, Charles de Lint, Charles R. Saunders, Walter Jon Williams, Alan Moore and Bradley Denton. Related works, including a comic book, have been brought out by other publishers.

Murasaki (novel)

Murasaki is a 1992 "shared universe" hard science fiction novel in six parts to which Poul Anderson, Greg Bear, Gregory Benford, David Brin, Nancy Kress and Frederik Pohl each contributed one chapter; it was edited by Robert Silverberg. It is the first anthology of this type to be entirely conceived and written by winners of the Nebula Award.

The scenery is set in a fictional double planet system in orbit around an actually existing red dwarf star (HD36395; also known as Gliese 205 and Wolf 1453), about 20 light years from our solar system. Because the system had been first explored by a Japanese robot interstellar probe the star has been given the proper name Murasaki (after the famous Japanese writer, Murasaki Shikibu). The larger of the two planets is Genji, named after Hikaru Genji, the hero of her novel Genji Monogatari; the smaller one is named Chujo, after Genji's close friend Tō no Chūjō.

Nancy Kress bibliography

A partial bibliography of American science fiction author Nancy Kress.

Nebula Award for Best Novella

The Nebula Award for Best Novella is given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA) for science fiction or fantasy novellas. A work of fiction is defined by the organization as a novella if it is between 17,500 and 40,000 words; awards are also given out for pieces of longer lengths in the novel category, and for shorter lengths in the short story and novelette categories. To be eligible for Nebula Award consideration a novella must be published in English in the United States. Works published in English elsewhere in the world are also eligible provided they are released on either a website or in an electronic edition. The Nebula Award for Best Novella has been awarded annually since 1966. Novellas published by themselves are eligible for the novel award instead if the author requests them to be considered as such. The award has been described as one of "the most important of the American science fiction awards" and "the science-fiction and fantasy equivalent" of the Emmy Awards.Nebula Award nominees and winners are chosen by members of the SFWA, though the authors of the nominees do not need to be members. Works are nominated each year between November 15 and February 15 by published authors who are members of the organization, and the six works that receive the most nominations then form the final ballot, with additional nominees possible in the case of ties. Members may then vote on the ballot throughout March, and the final results are presented at the Nebula Awards ceremony in May. Authors are not permitted to nominate their own works, and ties in the final vote are broken, if possible, by the number of nominations the works received. The rules were changed to their current format in 2009. Previously, the eligibility period for nominations was defined as one year after the publication date of the work, which allowed the possibility for works to be nominated in the calendar year after their publication and then be awarded in the calendar year after that. Works were added to a preliminary list for the year if they had ten or more nominations, which were then voted on to create a final ballot, to which the SFWA organizing panel was also allowed to add an additional work.During the 53 nomination years, 171 authors have had works nominated; 49 of these have won, including co-authors and ties. Nancy Kress has won the most awards: four out of eight nominations. Robert Silverberg, John Varley, and Roger Zelazny have each won twice out of eight, two, and three nominations, respectively. Silverberg's and Kress's eight nominations are the most of any authors, followed by Lucius Shepard and Michael Bishop at seven, and Kate Wilhelm and Avram Davidson with six. Bishop has the most nominations without receiving an award for novellas, though Wilhelm and Davidson have also not won an award.

Phoenix Pick

Phoenix Pick is the science fiction and fantasy imprint of Arc Manor Publishers based in Rockville, Maryland, United States.

Phoenix Pick publishes many classic and semi-classic works of science fiction and fantasy. These include Dark Universe (1961) and Simulacron-3 (1964) by Daniel F. Galouye, Lest Darkness Fall and Related Stories (1939) by L. Sprague de Camp (with the related stories by Frederik Pohl, David Drake, and S. M. Stirling) and The Long Tomorrow (1955) by Leigh Brackett.

In 2010, Phoenix Pick published two novellas nominated for the Nebula Award: "Act One" by Nancy Kress and '"Arkfall" by Carolyn Gilman. "Act One" was also nominated for the Hugo Award. That year, Phoenix Pick also published Ceres by L. Neil Smith, a finalist for the Prometheus Award.Other publications include Alexei and Cory Panshin's Hugo-Award-winning study on science fiction, The World Beyond the Hill (1989) and the Phoenix Science Fiction Classics series. The series publishes a number of annotated classic texts (with commentary) specifically geared toward college students. PSF Classics is edited by Paul Cook, and authors represented in this series include H. G. Wells and Jules Verne. Additionally, Phoenix Pick promotes Arc Manor's bimonthly Galaxy's Edge magazine.

Probability Sun

Probability Sun is a 2001 science fiction novel by American writer Nancy Kress, a sequel to her 2000 publication Probability Moon. It was followed in 2002 by Probability Space, which won the John W. Campbell Memorial Award.

The novel concerns a military expedition to the planet World, where aliens live who have developed a strange form of telepathy or collective unconscious, "shared reality", which causes piercing "head-pain" whenever "Worlders" attempt to hold strongly differing opinions. However, the expedition concerns a crash-landed alien artifact in the planet's crust which has uncharted powers, and may be the key to humanity winning a war against the "Fallers", a xenocidal alien race.

Tachyon Publications

Tachyon Publications is an independent press specializing in science fiction and fantasy books. Founded in San Francisco in 1995 by Jacob Weisman, Tachyon books have tended toward high-end literary works, short story collections, and anthologies.

In 2013, Tachyon's publication After the Fall, Before the Fall, During the Fall by Nancy Kress won the Nebula Award and Locus Award for best novella. Also in 2013, Tachyon's publication of The Emperor's Soul by Brandon Sanderson won the Hugo Award for best novella.From 1992-1994, Weisman also published Thirteenth Moon magazine, which featured short stories, poetry and essays by authors including Vicki Aron, Michael Astrov, M.J. Atkins, Simon Baker, Michael Bishop, Fred Branfman, Lela E. Buis, Paul Di Filippo, Linda Dunn, Alma Garcia, Lisa Goldstein, Brice Gorman, John Grey, Eva Hauser, Deborah Hunt, Knute Johnson, Lewis Jordan, Ursula K. Le Guin, Mary Soon Lee, Pamela Lovell, David Nemec, Lyn Nichols, Robert Patrick, David Sandner, Brian Skinner, Lia Smith, P. Stillman, Rob Sullivan, Pat Toomay, Inti Valverde, Peter Weverka and Wayne Wightman.

The Aliens of Earth

The Aliens of Earth is a collection of science fiction stories by American writer Nancy Kress. It was released in 1993 and was the author's first book published by Arkham House . It was published in an edition of 3,520 copies. Most of the stories originally appeared in Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine.

The Man Who Bridged the Mist

"The Man Who Bridged the Mist" is an award-winning science fiction/fantasy novella by Kij Johnson. It was first published in Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine in October/November 2011, and subsequently republished in The Year's Best Science Fiction: Twenty-Ninth Annual Collection, in The Best Science Fiction and Fantasy of the Year: Volume 6, in The Year's Best Science Fiction & Fantasy 2012, in Nebula Awards Showcase 2013, in Johnson's collection At the Mouth of the River of Bees, and as a chapbook from Phoenix Pick. In 2013, a Persian version was published by Parian Publications.

Theodore Sturgeon Award

The Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award is an annual award presented by the Center for the Study of Science Fiction at the University of Kansas to the author of the best short science fiction story published in English in the preceding calendar year. It is the short fiction counterpart of the John W. Campbell Memorial Award for Best Science Fiction Novel, awarded by the same organization. The award is named in honor of Theodore Sturgeon, one of the leading authors of the Golden Age of Science Fiction from 1939 to 1950. The award was established in 1987 by his heirs—including his widow, Jayne Sturgeon—and James Gunn, at the time the Director of the Center for the Study of Science Fiction.From 1987 through 1994 the award was given out by a panel of science fiction experts led by Orson Scott Card. Beginning in 1995, the committee was replaced by a group of jurors, who vote on the nominations submitted for consideration. The initial jurors were James Gunn, Frederik Pohl, and Judith Merril. Merril was replaced on the jury by former winner Kij Johnson in 1997, one of Sturgeon's children—Noel Sturgeon in most years—was added to the panel in 1999, and George Zebrowski was added to the panel in 2005. Nominations are submitted by reviewers, fans, publishers, and editors, and are collated by the current Director of the Center for the Study of Science Fiction, Christopher McKitterick, into a list of finalists to be voted on by the jury. The maximum eligible length that a work may be is not formally defined by the center. The winner is selected by May of each year, and is presented at the Campbell Conference awards banquet in June at the University of Kansas in Lawrence, as part of the centerpiece of the conference along with the Campbell Award. Winners are always invited to attend the ceremony. Since 2004 winners have received a personalized trophy, while since the inception of the award a permanent trophy has recorded all of the winners.During the 32 years the award has been active, 195 authors have had works nominated, 33 of whom have won, including one tie. No author has won more than once. John Kessel and Michael Swanwick have each won once out of seven nominations, Ursula K. Le Guin, Nancy Kress, and Ian McDonald one of six, Ted Chiang one of five, and Paolo Bacigalupi and Lucius Shepard have won once out of four times. Robert Reed has the most nominations without winning at eight, followed by James Patrick Kelly and Ian R. MacLeod at seven, and Greg Egan, Ken Liu, and Bruce Sterling at five.

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