Namadgi National Park

Namadgi National Park is a protected area in the south-west of the Australian Capital Territory, bordering Kosciuszko National Park in New South Wales. It lies approximately 40 kilometres (25 mi) southwest of Canberra, and makes up approximately 46% of the ACT's land area.[3]

The national park protects part of the northern end of the Australian Alps with its spectacular granite mountains. Its habitat ranges from grassy plains over snow gum forests to alpine meadows. The fauna is also varied: eastern grey kangaroos, wallabies, wombats, magpies, rosellas and ravens are commonly seen. The water catchment area of the park supplies approximately 85% of Canberra's water.

In this sub-alpine region the weather ranges from cold winter nights to warm summer days, and it can change very quickly. Snow normally falls on the Bimberi and Brindabella Ranges during winter, and is not uncommon throughout most of the park. The highest mountain is Bimberi Peak at 1,911 metres (6,270 ft) which is the highest peak in the Australian Capital Territory.

The national park is classified as an IUCN Category II protected area.[4]

Namadgi National Park
Australian Capital Territory
IUCN category II (national park)
Mount Ginini - Namadgi National Park - 2
View from the top of the Mount Ginini
Namadgi National Park is located in Australian Capital Territory
Namadgi National Park
Namadgi National Park
Nearest town or cityCanberra
Coordinates35°31′37″S 148°56′46″E / 35.52694°S 148.94611°ECoordinates: 35°31′37″S 148°56′46″E / 35.52694°S 148.94611°E
Established1984[1]
Area1,060.95 km2 (409.6 sq mi)[2]
Managing authoritiesACT Parks and Conservation Service
WebsiteNamadgi National Park
See alsoAustralian Capital Territory
protected areas

Traditional custodians of the land

Yankee Hat art-MJC
Yankee Hat aboriginal rock painting featuring a Kangaroo, Dingos, Emus, Humans and an Echidna or Turtle

Namadgi is a local Aboriginal name for the mountains situated to the southwest of Canberra. Aboriginal presence in the area has been dated to at least 21,000 years. There are numerous Aboriginal sites in the national park including paintings at Yankee Hat dating from at least 800 years ago.[5] The area is one of cultural significance to indigenous Australian people of the Australian Alps region, and in particular the Nyamudy/Namadgi tribe who inhabited the ACT region before European settlers arrived, and the national park's management plan is exercised with their consultation. In April 2001 representatives of the Ngambri communities entered into an agreement with the ACT government which recognised their traditional association with the national park's lands and their role and duty to their ancestors and descendants as custodians of the area, and established a system of cooperative management.[6]

The area has a European history dating back to the 1830s when settlers moved into the area and cleared the valleys for farming. The mountains and ridges remain forested. Namadgi National Park was created in 1984.

The Visitor Centre is located 2 km south of Tharwa on the Boboyan-Naas Road.

Winter sports

The Namadgi National Park Draft Management Plan (September 2005) downplayed the future development of skiing as a sport in the Park, noting that no facilities existed for alpine or downhill skiing within Namadgi, despite a history of downhill skiing associated with the Canberra Alpine Ski Club and the Mt Franklin Chalet (destroyed in the 2003 bushfires). The report predicted that it would be "unlikely that Namadgi will be suitable for this activity in the future as climate change is causing conditions to become less favourable."[7] However, since the report was written, limited downhill ski facilities have returned at nearby Corin Forest, and cross country skiing takes place within the Park at various locations when conditions allow.

Mt Franklin

In the 1930s, with construction of the new capital city of Canberra underway, Canberrans explored the possibilities for developing skiing and snow sports in the Brindabellas. On 30 June 1936, the Canberra Times newspaper reported:[8]

Regularly-conducted Alpine Sports on the mountain range which forms the western boundary between the Federal Capital Territory and New South Wales are to be added to the attractions of Canberra. The Canberra Alpine Club, an enthusiastic body, which has a membership of about 80, has plans in hand which, its members consider, will in the future make Canberra's ranges rival Mount Kosciuszko in popularity.

The Mount Franklin chalet was constructed at Mount Franklin in 1938 to service the Canberra Alpine Club.[9] Ski runs were cleared and ski tows were improvised.[10] The Club also cleared runs elsewhere, completing a new ski run and jump on nearby Mount Ginini in 1951 - then judged to be the superior slope.[11] Built on leased land, the Mount Franklin Chalet reverted to the Government when Namadgi National Park was created in 1984 and later operated as a museum before being destroyed in the 2003 bushfires.[12] A new shelter designed and built by University of Adelaide students opened in 2008. Today, cross country skiing is possible in the area, when conditions allow.[13]

Australian National Heritage List

On 7 November 2008, the national park was one of eleven protected areas added to the Australian National Heritage List under the title of the Australian Alps National Parks and Reserves.[14][15]

Panoramic view from the top of Mount Ginini, Namadgi National Park.
Panoramic view from the top of Mount Ginini, Namadgi National Park.

Gallery

Namadgi National Park walking trail

Namadgi National Park walking trail

Mount Ginini - Namadgi National Park

View from the top of the Mount Ginini

Eucalyptus niphophila - Mount Ginini - Namadgi National Park

Eucalyptus pauciflora subsp. niphophila

Corin Dam aerial W

Aerial view of Corin Dam

See also

References

  1. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2 May 2013. Retrieved 2 June 2013.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  2. ^ "Namadgi National Park". Environment.act.gov.au. 23 April 2018. Retrieved 16 August 2018.
  3. ^ "Namadgi National Park". Australian Alps National Parks. Commonwealth of Australia. Retrieved 29 January 2010.
  4. ^ "Terrestrial Protected Areas in ACT (2014) (see 'DETAIL' tab)". CAPAD 2014. Australian Government - Department of the Environment. 2014. Retrieved 15 September 2015.
  5. ^ Parks and Conservation Service. "Namadgi National Park Map and Guide" (PDF). Retrieved 25 February 2015.
  6. ^ "Namadgi National Park Revised Draft Plan of Management" (PDF). Department of Territory and Municipal Services. 2007. Archived from the original (PDF) on 3 August 2008. Retrieved 30 January 2010.
  7. ^ [1]
  8. ^ [2]
  9. ^ "Australian Alps National Parks - Parks in the alps - Bimberi Nature Reserve". Australianalps.environment.gov.au. Retrieved 16 August 2018.
  10. ^ "What's On". 25 January 2014. Archived from the original on 25 January 2014. Retrieved 16 August 2018.
  11. ^ [3]
  12. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 25 January 2014. Retrieved 5 April 2014.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  13. ^ "Australian Alps National Parks - Parks in the alps - Namadgi National Park". Australianalps.environment.gov.au. Retrieved 16 August 2018.
  14. ^ "Australian Alps National Parks information". Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. Retrieved 10 June 2010.
  15. ^ "INCLUSION OF A PLACE IN THE NATIONAL HERITAGE LIST" (PDF). Commonwealth of Australia. Retrieved 30 June 2015.

Further reading

  • Nationale Parken in Australië (2000) (Dutch translation of Discover Australia National Parks by Ron and Viv Moon)

External links

Media related to Namadgi National Park at Wikimedia Commons

Bendora Dam

The Bendora Dam is a thin-wall, double curvature concrete arch dam across the upper reaches of the Cotter River, located within Namadgi National Park in the Australian Capital Territory, Australia. The impounded reservoir is called the Bendora Reservoir which is a supply source of potable water for the city of Canberra and its environs.

Bimberi Peak

Bimberi Peak or Mount Bimberi with an elevation of 1,913 metres (6,276 ft) located within the Brindabella Ranges is the highest mountain in the Australian Capital Territory. It is located on the border between New South Wales and the ACT, the NSW portion in Kosciuszko National Park and the ACT portion in Namadgi National Park. It is accessible by bush walking trails and requires no specialised climbing skills, although there is no marked trail to the very summit.

Booroomba Rocks

Booroomba Rocks is a granite climbing area in Namadgi National Park, in the Australian Capital Territory, particularly noted for its slab climbing. The rocks are divided into several areas, the most prominent being North Buttress, Middle Rocks, and South Buttress.

The area was first approached from Booroomba Station. However, it was not until Honeysuckle Creek Tracking Station, and the associated Apollo Road were opened, that the area became feasible as a climbing area.

Brindabella Range

The Brindabella Range, commonly called The Brindabellas, is a mountain range located in Australia, on a state and territory border of New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory (ACT). The range rises to the west of Canberra, the capital city of Australia, and includes the Namadgi National Park in the ACT and the Bimberi Nature Reserve and Brindabella National Park in New South Wales. The Brindabellas are visible to the west of Canberra and form an important part of the city's landscape.

Corin Dam

The Corin Dam is an earth and rockfill embankment dam with an uncontrolled side channel spillway across the Cotter River, located within Namadgi National Park in the Australian Capital Territory, Australia. The impounded reservoir is called the Corin Reservoir which is a supply source of potable water for the city of Canberra and its environs. It is named after William Corin (1867-1929), a pioneer in hydroelectric development in Australia.

Corin Forest

Corin Forest Mountain Resort (elevation 1200m) is a commercial ski field and tourist destination located in the Tidbinbilla Range, south west of Canberra in the Australian Capital Territory. Situated in a mountain ash forest near the Namadgi National Park, in winter, it offers Australia's most northerly lifted ski area, and the closest to the national capital of Canberra. A 1.2 km mountain slide operates in the warmer months.

Cotter River

The Cotter River, a perennial river of the Murrumbidgee catchment within the Murray-Darling basin, is located in the Australian Capital Territory, Australia. The Cotter River, together with the Queanbeyan River, is one of two rivers that provides potable water to the Canberra and Queanbeyan region.

List of mountains in the Australian Capital Territory

This is a list of mountains in the Australian Capital Territory. It includes all mountains with a gazetted name.

This list is complete with respect to the 1996 Gazetteer of Australia. Dubious names have been checked against the online 2004 data, and in all cases confirmed correct. However, if any mountains have been gazetted or deleted since 1996, this list does not reflect these changes. Strictly speaking, Australian place names are gazetted in capital letters only; the names in this list have been converted to mixed case in accordance with normal capitalisation conventions. Locations are as gazetted.

Matilda House (activist)

Matilda Williams House was born in 1945 on the Erambie (also spelt as Arambie) Aboriginal Reserve at Cowra, New South Wales (NSW), and raised in her grandfather’s house at Hollywood Aboriginal Reserve in Yass, NSW. When she was 12, House spent a year in Parramatta Girls' Home. House was one of ten children.

House identifies as belonging to the Ngambri-Ngunnawal family group (also referred to as Ngambri-Ngunnuwal family group), which has been formally recognised by the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) Government as having historical connections to the Canberra region and surrounds, particularly the region around Namadgi National Park. Black Harry Williams, also known as Ngoobra, House’s great-grandfather, and Harry Williams her grandfather, both identified as Ngambri.There remains a dispute over who 'rights to country' belong to in the ACT, with the ACT Government issuing formal protocols regarding recognition of the traditional owners of the land on which Canberra is located, in response to a request from the United Ngunnawal Elders Council.House returned to Canberra in 1963 and has been actively involved in Indigenous Affairs in the Canberra region since 1967.House is the Chair of the Ngambri Local Aboriginal Land Council in Queanbeyan, NSW, which she established with her brothers in 1984, and the Joint Chair of the Interim Namadgi National Park Committee. She assisted in establishing the Aboriginal Legal Service in the 1980s, and has continued more recently through her membership of the Aboriginal Justice Advisory Committee.House has performed numerous welcoming ceremonies, including notably the first Welcome to Country to be held at the Australian Parliament at the opening of the 42nd Parliament of Australia.House has also served on the first ACT Heritage Council, the United Ngunnawal Elders Council, the Queanbeyan Regional Council of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission (ATSIC), the Ngambri Local Aboriginal Land Council, the Tent Embassy Advisory Committee and the ACT Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Consultative Council. She has also acted as an ACT honorary ambassador.House's involvement in Indigenous Affairs led to her delivering the welcome at Australians for Native Title and Reconciliation's ‘Sea of Hands’ installation, and contributing to the 'Bringing Them Home' report into the Stolen Generations. She was also one of the original protestors who established the Aboriginal Tent Embassy in 1972.House was named Canberra Citizen of the Year by ACT Chief Minister Jon Stanhope MLA in 2006.

Mount Franklin (Australian Capital Territory)

Mount Franklin is a mountain with an elevation of 1,646 metres (5,400 ft) AHD  in the Brindabella Ranges that is located on the border between the Australian Capital Territory and New South Wales, Australia. The summit of the mountain is located in the Australian Capital Territory.

The mountain is located in the Bimberi Nature Reserve and the Namadgi National Park. A marked walking trail to the summit can be reached via Mount Franklin Road. The summit is accessible by bush walking trails and requires no specialised climbing skills. It is located close to Brindabella Station where the Australian author Miles Franklin once lived and the mountain is named after her family. The mountain is often covered in snow in winter and Australian ski pioneers based themselves at Mount Franklin from the 1930s. Nowadays, cross country skiing is possible in the area during winter, when conditions allow.

Mount Gingera

Mount Gingera is a mountain with an elevation of 1,857 metres (6,093 ft) AHD  located within the Brindabella Ranges on the border between the Australian Capital Territory and New South Wales in Australia. The summit of the mountain is located within the ACT, and is the second highest peak in the territory.

The mountain is the most prominent snow-covered peak to be seen from Canberra in winter. It is located on the border between New South Wales and the ACT, the NSW portion in Kosciuszko National Park and the ACT portion in Namadgi National Park. The sub-alpine sphagnum bogs on the flanks of Mount Gingera and nearby Mount Ginini to the north are known habitats of the endangered Northern Corroboree Frog (Pseudophryne pengilleyi).

Mount Kelly

Mount Kelly is a mountain with an elevation of 1,829 metres (6,001 ft) AHD  that is the tallest peak in the Scabby Range and is situated on the border of the Australian Capital Territory and New South Wales, Australia. The summit of the mountain is located within the ACT. The nearest town to the mountain is Adaminaby, approximately 32.8 kilometres (20.4 mi) to the south.The ACT portion of the mountain is located within Namadgi National Park and the NSW side within the Scabby Nature Reserve and Kosciuszko National Park. The Scabby Range includes Mount Scabby, at 1,798 metres (5,899 ft) AHD , which forms part of the catchment area for the Cotter River. The area surrounding Mount Kelly is a wilderness area which was severely affected by the Canberra bushfires of 2003.

Naas (valley)

Naas Valley is an area south of Canberra, Australia in the Brindabella Ranges which was first settled by Europeans in 1834. The watershed of Naas Creek forms the southern and south-eastern boundary of the Australian Capital Territory, as specified in the Seat of Government Acceptance Act 1909.The first European settler of the Naas Valley was William Herbert who was a squatter. However, by 1848 Herbert was granted 2428 hectares of land on a leasehold basis.The area is now mostly part of Namadgi National Park.

Naas River

The Naas River, a perennial stream of the Murrumbidgee catchment within the Murray-Darling basin, is located in the Australian Capital Territory, Australia.

Orroral River

Orroral River, a perennial stream of the Murrumbidgee catchment within the Murray-Darling basin, is located in the Australian Capital Territory, Australia.

Shannons Flat

Shannons Flat is a locality in the Monaro region of New South Wales, Australia. The town is in the Snowy Monaro Regional Council local government area, sandwiched between the southern border of the Namadgi National Park in the Australian Capital Territory and the Murrumbidgee River. Shannons Flat also adjoins the NSW suburbs of Yaouk, Bolaro, Murrumbucca, Bredbo and Billilingra. It is about 308 kilometres (191 mi) south west of the state capital, Sydney, and 70 kilometres (40 mi) from the Australian national capital of Canberra. It is just over 40 kilometres (25 mi) north west of the regional centre, Cooma.

At the 2016 census, Shannons Flat had a population of 78.

Skiing in the Australian Capital Territory

Skiing in the Australian Capital Territory refers to snow skiing in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT). The highest mountain in the ACT is Bimberi Peak (elevation 1912m). Recreational skiing commenced with the formation of the Canberra Alpine Club in 1934. Since the 1930s, the ACT has had intermittent and limited alpine skiing facilities. Downhill ski facilities returned to the ACT at Corin Forest in 2016, after a two decade hiatus.The only commercial ski field in the ACT is located at Corin Forest; however, cross country skiing takes place in areas such as the Namadgi National Park, Bimberi Nature Reserve, Mount Franklin, Mount Ginini and Mount Gingera when conditions allow. The more extensive and developed New South Wales skifields are located south-west of the Territory.

T. vermicularis

T. vermicularis may refer to:

Takifugu vermicularis, the vermiculated puffer, a fish species found in Korea

Thamnolia vermicularis, a fungus species associated in lichens in the genus Thamnolia found in high parts of Namadgi National Park in the Australian Capital Territory and Severnaya Zemlya

Typhlops vermicularis, the European blind snake or worm snake, a reptile species found in Europe and Lebanon

Yaouk

Yaouk () is a locality in the Snowy Monaro Region, New South Wales, Australia. It lies in open grassland valleys surrounded by mountains on both sides of the Murrumbidgee River, downstream from and east of the Tantangara Dam, north of Adaminaby, east of the Kosciuszko National Park and south of the Namadgi National Park in the Australian Capital Territory, but separated from it by the mountainous Scabby Range. It is about 110 km south of Canberra and about 75 km northwest of Cooma. At the 2016 census, it had a population of 25.

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