Naismith College Player of the Year

The Naismith College Player of the Year is an annual basketball award given by the Atlanta Tipoff Club to the top men's and women's collegiate basketball players. It is named in honor of the inventor of basketball (in 1891), Dr. James Naismith.

Naismith College Player of the Year
Naismith Trophy
The Naismith Trophy that was presented to Tina Charles in 2010.
Given forthe most outstanding male and female basketball player
CountryUnited States
Presented byAtlanta Tipoff Club
History
First award1969
Most recentMen: Zion Williamson, Duke
Women: Megan Gustafson, Iowa
Websiteofficial site

History and selection

First awarded exclusively to male players in 1969, the award was expanded to include female players in 1983. Annually before the college season begins in November, a "watchlist" consisting of 50 players is chosen by the Atlanta Tipoff Club board of selectors, comprising head coaches, administrators and media members from across the United States. By February, the list of nominees is narrowed down to 30 players based on performance. In March, four out of the 30 players are selected as finalists and are placed in the final ballot. The final winners are selected in April by both the board of selectors and fan voting via text messaging.[1][2] The winners receive the Naismith Trophy.

Since its beginning in 1969, the trophy has been awarded to 43 male and 23 female players. Lew Alcindor of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and Anne Donovan of Old Dominion University were the first winners, respectively. Bill Walton of UCLA and Ralph Sampson of the University of Virginia have been the only men to win this award multiple times, with both winning three times. Eight women in all have won this award multiple times. Cheryl Miller of the University of Southern California and Breanna Stewart of the University of Connecticut are the only three-times winners, while seven others won it twice: Clarissa Davis of the University of Texas, Dawn Staley of the University of Virginia, Chamique Holdsclaw of the University of Tennessee, Diana Taurasi and Maya Moore of the University of Connecticut, Seimone Augustus of Louisiana State University, and Brittney Griner of Baylor University. Davis and Moore are the only ones of either sex to have won multiple times in non-consecutive years.

Two award winners were born in United States territories:

The only three award winners who have been born outside the jurisdiction of the United States were:

Three of these players were developed at least partially in the U.S. proper—Lee was raised in Harlem from early childhood, Ewing immigrated to the Boston area at age 12, and Hield attended high school in suburban Wichita, Kansas. Duncan did not move to the U.S. proper until he arrived at Wake Forest University, and Bogut lived in Australia until his arrival at the University of Utah.

Duke has had the most male winners with eight, while Connecticut has had the most female winners, with ten awards won by six individuals. The award has been won by a freshman three times: Kevin Durant playing for Texas in 2007, in 2012 by Anthony Davis of Kentucky and Zion Williamson of Duke in 2019

Winners

* Denotes players inducted to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame
Player (X) Denotes the number of times the player has won the award

Men

Men
Year Player College Position Class
1969 Lew Alcindor* UCLA Center Senior
1970 Pete Maravich* LSU Guard Senior
1971 Austin Carr Notre Dame Guard Senior
1972 Bill Walton* UCLA Center Sophomore
1973 Bill Walton* (2) UCLA Center Junior
1974 Bill Walton* (3) UCLA Center Senior
1975 David Thompson* N.C. State Guard Senior
1976 Scott May Indiana Forward Senior
1977 Marques Johnson UCLA Forward Senior
1978 Butch Lee Marquette Guard Senior
1979 Larry Bird* Indiana State Forward Senior
1980 Mark Aguirre DePaul Forward Sophomore
1981 Ralph Sampson* Virginia Center Sophomore
1982 Ralph Sampson* (2) Virginia Center Junior
1983 Ralph Sampson* (3) Virginia Center Senior
1984 Michael Jordan* North Carolina Guard Junior
1985 Patrick Ewing* Georgetown Center Senior
1986 Johnny Dawkins Duke Guard Senior
1987 David Robinson* Navy Center Senior
1988 Danny Manning Kansas Forward Senior
1989 Danny Ferry Duke Forward Senior
1990 Lionel Simmons La Salle Forward Senior
1991 Larry Johnson UNLV Forward Senior
1992 Christian Laettner Duke Forward Senior
1993 Calbert Cheaney Indiana Guard Senior
1994 Glenn Robinson Purdue Forward Junior
1995 Joe Smith Maryland Forward Sophomore
1996 Marcus Camby Massachusetts Center Junior
1997 Tim Duncan Wake Forest Center Senior
1998 Antawn Jamison North Carolina Forward Junior
1999 Elton Brand Duke Forward Sophomore
2000 Kenyon Martin Cincinnati Forward Senior
2001 Shane Battier Duke Forward Senior
2002 Jason Williams Duke Guard Junior
2003 T. J. Ford Texas Guard Sophomore
2004 Jameer Nelson Saint Joseph's Guard Senior
2005 Andrew Bogut Utah Center Sophomore
2006 J. J. Redick Duke Guard Senior[3]
2007 Kevin Durant Texas Forward Freshman[4]
2008 Tyler Hansbrough North Carolina Forward Junior[5]
2009 Blake Griffin Oklahoma Forward Sophomore[6]
2010 Evan Turner Ohio State Guard Junior[7]
2011 Jimmer Fredette Brigham Young Guard Senior
2012 Anthony Davis Kentucky Center Freshman
2013 Trey Burke Michigan Guard Sophomore
2014 Doug McDermott Creighton Forward Senior
2015 Frank Kaminsky Wisconsin Forward Senior
2016 Buddy Hield Oklahoma Guard Senior
2017 Frank Mason III Kansas Guard Senior
2018 Jalen Brunson Villanova Guard Junior
2019 Zion Williamson Duke Forward Freshman

Women

Women
Year Player College Position Class
1983 Anne Donovan*[8] Old Dominion Center Senior
1984 Cheryl Miller*[9] USC Forward/Center Sophomore
1985 Cheryl Miller* (2)[9] USC Forward/Center Junior
1986 Cheryl Miller* (3)[9] USC Forward/Center Senior
1987 Clarissa Davis[10] Texas Forward Sophomore
1988 Sue Wicks[11] Rutgers Forward Senior
1989 Clarissa Davis (2)[12] Texas Forward Senior
1990 Jennifer Azzi[13] Stanford Guard Senior
1991 Dawn Staley*[14] Virginia Point guard Junior
1992 Dawn Staley* (2)[14] Virginia Point guard Senior
1993 Sheryl Swoopes*[15] Texas Tech Guard/Forward Senior
1994 Lisa Leslie*[16] USC Center Senior
1995 Rebecca Lobo*[17] Connecticut Center Senior
1996 Saudia Roundtree[18] Georgia Guard Junior
1997 Kate Starbird[19] Stanford Forward Senior
1998 Chamique Holdsclaw[20] Tennessee Forward Junior
1999 Chamique Holdsclaw (2)[20] Tennessee Forward Senior
2000 Tamika Catchings[21] Tennessee Forward Junior
2001 Ruth Riley[22] Notre Dame Center Senior
2002 Sue Bird[23] Connecticut Guard Senior
2003 Diana Taurasi[24] Connecticut Guard Junior
2004 Diana Taurasi (2)[24] Connecticut Guard Senior
2005 Seimone Augustus[25] LSU Guard/Forward Junior
2006 Seimone Augustus (2)[25] LSU Guard/Forward Senior
2007 Lindsey Harding[26] Duke Point guard Senior
2008 Candace Parker[27] Tennessee Forward Junior
2009 Maya Moore[24] Connecticut Forward Sophomore
2010 Tina Charles[28] Connecticut Center Senior
2011 Maya Moore (2)[24] Connecticut Forward Senior
2012 Brittney Griner[29] Baylor Center Junior
2013 Brittney Griner (2)[30] Baylor Center Senior
2014 Breanna Stewart[24] Connecticut Forward Sophomore
2015 Breanna Stewart (2)[24] Connecticut Forward Junior
2016 Breanna Stewart (3)[24] Connecticut Forward Senior
2017 Kelsey Plum Washington Point guard Senior
2018 A'ja Wilson[31] South Carolina Forward Senior
2019 Megan Gustafson[32] Iowa Center Senior

See also

References

  1. ^ "Naismith Trophy Fact Sheet". Naismith Awards. Archived from the original on February 4, 2008. Retrieved January 5, 2010.
  2. ^ "The Naismith Trophy History". Naismith Awards. Archived from the original on March 2, 2009. Retrieved January 5, 2010.
  3. ^ "Scout.com: Redick Wins Naismith Award". Duke.scout.com. April 3, 2006. Archived from the original on July 16, 2011. Retrieved April 5, 2010.
  4. ^ "Kevin Durant Wins 2007 Naismith Award – Big 12 Conference – Official Athletic Site". Big12sports.com. April 2, 2007. Retrieved April 5, 2010.
  5. ^ "Press Release – April 6, 2008". Atlantatipoffclub.com. Retrieved April 5, 2010.
  6. ^ "Blake Griffin Claims Naismith Trophy, NABC and Newell Awards – Big 12 Conference – Official Athletic Site". Big12sports.com. March 20, 2009. Retrieved April 5, 2010.
  7. ^ Baptist, Bob. "OSU men's basketball: Turner wins Naismith Trophy | BuckeyeXtra". Dispatch.com. Archived from the original on April 7, 2010. Retrieved April 5, 2010.
  8. ^ "Naismith Trophy Postseason Awards". Peach State Basketball. Retrieved 2016-04-05.
  9. ^ a b c "Pac-12 Player of the Century Cheryl Miller Leads Trojan-Studded Pac-12 All-Century Womens Basketball Team". www.usctrojans.com. Retrieved 2016-04-05.
  10. ^ iThemesLab. "Clarissa Davis-Wrightsil - Women's Basketball Hall of Fame". www.wbhof.com. Archived from the original on 2016-03-28. Retrieved 2016-04-05.
  11. ^ "ST. FRANCIS (NY) COACH SUE WICKS: INTERNATIONAL NBA ENVOY". www.sfc.edu. Retrieved 2016-04-05.
  12. ^ "Articles about Naismith Award - latimes". articles.latimes.com. Retrieved 2016-04-05.
  13. ^ "University of San Francisco Dons Athletics - 2014-15 Women's Basketball Coaching Staff". www.usfdons.com. Retrieved 2016-04-05.
  14. ^ a b "Dawn Staley to be Honored With UVa's Distinguished Alumna Award". www.virginiasports.com. Retrieved 2016-04-05.
  15. ^ "Sheryl Swoopes elected to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame". Hoopfeed.com. Retrieved 2016-04-05.
  16. ^ "Trojan Great Lisa Leslie Named To Naismith Memorial Hall of Fame". www.usctrojans.com. Retrieved 2016-04-05.
  17. ^ jjackson. "1995 NCAA Woman of the Year". NCAA.org - The Official Site of the NCAA. Retrieved 2016-04-05.
  18. ^ "Saudia Roundtree Bio - UCF Knights - Official Athletics Site". www.ucfknights.com. Archived from the original on 2016-04-23. Retrieved 2016-04-05.
  19. ^ "Kate Starbird, former basketball star, chooses a different route — as usual". The Seattle Times. 2013-03-05. Retrieved 2016-04-05.
  20. ^ a b "Inside Chamique Holdsclaw: From Basketball Super Star to Mental Health Activist". Buzzflash. Retrieved 2016-04-05.
  21. ^ "Tamika Catchings continues to build legacy after Lady Vols career". The Daily Beacon. Retrieved 2016-04-05.
  22. ^ "Ruth Riley Named Naismith Player of the Year". www.und.com. Retrieved 2016-04-05.
  23. ^ Congressional Record V. 148, Pt. 4, April 11, 2002 to April 24, 2002. Government Printing Office.
  24. ^ a b c d e f g "UConn's Breanna Stewart named 2016 Women's Naismith Trophy winner". NCAA.com. Retrieved 2016-04-05.
  25. ^ a b "Seimone Augustus Bio". LSUsports.net. Retrieved 2016-04-05.
  26. ^ "Harding takes home Naismith NPOY award". The Duke Chronicle. Archived from the original on 2016-04-18. Retrieved 2016-04-05.
  27. ^ "Candace Parker Wins 2008 Naismith Trophy". www.utsports.com. Retrieved 2016-04-05.
  28. ^ Courant, Hartford. "Tina Charles Wins Naismith Award". courant.com. Retrieved 2016-04-05.
  29. ^ "Baylor University || Baylor Nation || News". www.baylor.edu. Archived from the original on 2016-02-17. Retrieved 2016-04-05.
  30. ^ "Griner Wins Second Straight Naismith Trophy". www.baylorbears.com. Retrieved 2016-04-05.
  31. ^ "South Carolina's A'ja Wilson wins Naismith Women's Basketball Player of the Year Award". www.ncaa.com. Retrieved 1 April 2018.
  32. ^ "2019 Women's Citizen Naismith Trophy and Werner Ladder Naismith Women's Coach of the Year Both Claimed by Iowa" (Press release). Atlanta Tipoff Club. April 6, 2019. Retrieved April 6, 2019.

External links

1981 NBA draft

The 1981 NBA draft was the 35th annual draft of the National Basketball Association (NBA). The draft was held on June 9, 1981, before the 1981–82 season. The draft was broadcast in the United States on the USA Network. In this draft, 23 NBA teams took turns selecting amateur U.S. college basketball players and other eligible players, including international players. The first two picks in the draft belonged to the teams that finished last in each conference, with the order determined by a coin flip. The Dallas Mavericks won the coin flip and were awarded the first overall pick, while the Detroit Pistons were awarded the second pick. The remaining first-round picks and the subsequent rounds were assigned to teams in reverse order of their win–loss record in the previous season. A player who had finished his four-year college eligibility was automatically eligible for selection. Before the draft, five college underclassmen announced that they would leave college early and would be eligible for selection. The draft consisted of 10 rounds comprising the selection of 223 players.

The Dallas Mavericks used their first pick to draft 1980 Naismith College Player of the Year Mark Aguirre from DePaul University. Aguirre, who had just finished his junior season in college, became the second underclassman to be drafted first overall, after Magic Johnson in 1979. The Detroit Pistons used the second overall pick to draft Isiah Thomas, a sophomore guard from Indiana University. Thomas had just won the 1981 National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Championship with Indiana and was named as the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. The New Jersey Nets used the third pick to draft another underclassman, Buck Williams, from the University of Maryland. Williams went on to win the Rookie of the Year Award and was also selected to the All-Star Game in his rookie season. This draft marked the first time that the first three selections were college underclassmen. Danny Ainge, the 1981 Wooden College Player of the Year, was selected in the second round with the 31st pick by the Boston Celtics. Ainge had been playing professional baseball since 1979 with the Toronto Blue Jays in the Major League Baseball (MLB) while also playing college basketball at Brigham Young University. He reportedly preferred to continue his baseball career, but the Celtics successfully persuaded him to play basketball instead. He is one of only twelve athletes who have played in both the NBA and MLB.

1986 in basketball

The following are the basketball events of the year 1986 throughout the world.

1987 in basketball

The following are the basketball events of the year 1987 throughout the world.

1989 in basketball

The following are the basketball events of the year 1989 throughout the world.

1992 in basketball

The following are the basketball events of the year 1992 throughout the world.

1996 in basketball

The following are the basketball events of the year 1996 throughout the world.

Atlantic 10 Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year

The Atlantic 10 Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year is a basketball award given to the Atlantic 10 Conference's (A–10) most outstanding player. The award was first given following the conference's inaugural 1976–77 season, when the conference was officially known as the Eastern Collegiate Basketball League but popularly known as the Eastern 8. David West of Xavier is the only player to have won the award three times (2001–03). Four other players—James Bailey, Earl Belcher, Greg Jones and Steven Smith—have won the award twice. Two players—Marcus Camby (1996) and Jameer Nelson (2004)—have also won the award in the same season that they were named the Naismith College Player of the Year or received the John R. Wooden Award, the nation's two most prestigious men's college basketball awards.

As of 2018, Temple has the most all-time winners with ten, but the Owls left for the American Athletic Conference in July 2013. Among schools remaining in the conference beyond 2013, Saint Joseph's and UMass have the most winners, with five each. There have been three ties in the award's history (1983, 2005, 2018). Four current member schools have had no winners—Dayton, Fordham, George Mason, and VCU. However, of these schools, only Dayton and Fordham were A-10 members before 2012.

Big East Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year

The Big East Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year award is given to the men's basketball player in the Big East Conference voted as the top performer by the conference coaches. It was first awarded at the end of the league's inaugural season of 1979–80.

The head coaches of the league's teams (currently 10) submit their votes following the end of the regular season and before the conference's tournament in early March. The coaches cannot vote for their own players.The award was introduced following the conference's first season in 1980, in which it was presented to John Duren of Georgetown. Patrick Ewing (Georgetown), Richard Hamilton (Connecticut), Troy Bell (Boston College), Troy Murphy (Notre Dame) and Kris Dunn (Providence) each won the award twice, and Chris Mullin (St. John's) won three consecutive times from 1983 through 1985. Three award winners have been inducted as players to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. Ewing, who shared the award in 1984 and 1985 with Mullin, was inducted in 2008 after playing 17 years in the National Basketball Association between 1985 and 2002. Mullin followed in 2011 after a 16-year NBA career (1985–2001). Most recently, Georgetown's 1992 Player of the Year Alonzo Mourning entered the Hall in 2014 following a 16-year NBA career (1992–2008). There have been seven ties; the most recent instance was that between Dunn and Ryan Arcidiacono of Villanova in 2015.Seven players have been awarded a major national player of the year award in the same year that they received a Big East Player of the Year award. In 1985, Ewing and Mullin shared the conference award, while Ewing was named Naismith College Player of the Year and Mullin was given the John R. Wooden Award. The following year, Walter Berry of St. John's received the Wooden Award and the Big East Player of the Year award. In 1996, Ray Allen of Connecticut received the conference award and was also the final recipient of the UPI Player of the Year Award. In 2004, Connecticut's Emeka Okafor won the conference award while sharing NABC Player of the Year honors with Jameer Nelson of Saint Joseph's. Creighton's Doug McDermott received all major national awards along with the conference award in 2014. Finally, Villanova's Jalen Brunson was the national player of the year as well in 2018. Georgetown has had the most winners, with eight. The only current Big East members without a winner are Butler and Xavier, both of which joined the conference at its relaunch following its 2013 split into two leagues, and DePaul, members since 2005.

Big East Conference Women's Basketball Player of the Year

The Big East Conference Women's Basketball Player of the Year award is given to the women's basketball player in the Big East Conference voted as the top performer by the conference coaches. It was first awarded at the end of the 1982–83 season, the first in which the Big East sponsored women's basketball.

The head coaches of the league's teams submit their votes following the end of the regular season and before the conference's tournament in early March. The coaches cannot vote for their own players.The first award went to Debbie Beckford of St. John's in 1983. There have been five multiple winners so far. Rebecca Lobo and Diana Taurasi, both of Connecticut, each won the award twice in their careers. Shelly Pennefather of Villanova and two UConn players, Kerry Bascom and Maya Moore, were each three-time winners. Uniquely, Moore's wins were not all consecutive, as she lost out to her UConn teammate Tina Charles in 2009–10.

So far, voting has resulted in a tie once, in 1984 when both Jennifer Bruce and Kathy Finn won the award.

Seven players have also won National Player of the Year awards. Rebecca Lobo, Ruth Riley, Sue Bird, Diana Taurasi, and Maya Moore are all recipients of the Naismith College Player of the Year award. Shelly Pennefather, Lobo, Jennifer Rizzotti, Bird, Taurasi, and Moore are all recipients of the Wade Trophy. Moore is also a recipient of the John R. Wooden Award.

Connecticut has the most all-time awards, with 17, and the most individual winners, with 11. The only current Big East members with more than one winner are Villanova, with two players who combined to win four awards, and DePaul, with three players who each won one award. Three current Big East members have yet to have a winner—Seton Hall, which was a charter member of the Big East in 1979, and Butler and Xavier, both of which joined the Big East at its 2013 relaunch following the conference split which spawned the American Athletic Conference.

Brittany Boyd

Brittany Boyd (born June 11, 1993) is an American basketball player for the New York Liberty of the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA). She played college basketball for the California Golden Bears. She was selected by New York in the first round of the 2015 WNBA draft with the ninth overall pick.Boyd grew up in Richmond, California, and attended high school in Berkeley at Berkeley High. As a senior in college, she helped Cal advance to the second round of the 2015 NCAA Tournament. Boyd averaged 13.4 points, 7.7 rebounds, 6.8 assists and 2.9 steals per game for the season, and was a semifinalist for the Naismith College Player of the Year. She was the first player in the history of the Pac-12 Conference to reach career totals of 1,400 points, 700 rebounds, 600 assists and 300 steals.

Clarissa Davis

Clarissa Davis (born June 4, 1967) is former Texas women's basketball All-American, who is also known as Clarissa Davis-Wrightsil. She is a National Player of the Year, Olympic and pro standout, and was inducted into The Women's Basketball Hall of Fame in April 2006. She was one of six inductees in the Class of 2006, which features four former players and two coaches. Born and raised in San Antonio, Texas, Davis played under coach Mike Floyd at John Jay High School before playing at the University of Texas. She also played basketball in Europe with Galatasaray Istanbul and Fenerbahçe Istanbul in Turkey and won Turkish Championships with both of these rival clubs.

Frank Mason III

Frank Leo Mason III (born April 3, 1994) is an American professional basketball player for the Sacramento Kings of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He played college basketball for the University of Kansas, where he was the starting point guard for the Jayhawks. For the 2016–17 season, he was named National Player of the Year by all of the major national player awards, making him consensus national player of the year. The awards are the John R. Wooden Award, CBS Sports National Player of the Year, the USA Today, the Sporting News Player of the Year, Associated Press Player of the Year, Naismith College Player of the Year, Oscar Robertson Trophy, and NABC Player of the Year. He was also a consensus All-American selection for his senior season at Kansas.

Helms Foundation College Basketball Player of the Year

The Helms Foundation College Basketball Player of the Year was an annual basketball award given to the most outstanding intercollegiate men's basketball player in the United States. The award was first given following the 1904–05 season and ceased being awarded after the 1978–79 season. It was the first major most valuable player (MVP) award for men's basketball in the United States, and the Helms Athletic Foundation was considered within the basketball community to be the authority on men's college basketball for that era. Thus, the award was viewed as the premier player of the year award one could receive up until the 1960s, at which point the Naismith College Player of the Year and John R. Wooden Award took over as the national season MVP awards.

Kevin Durant

Kevin Wayne Durant (born September 29, 1988) is an American professional basketball player for the Golden State Warriors of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He played one season of college basketball for the University of Texas, and was selected as the second overall pick by the Seattle SuperSonics in the 2007 NBA draft. He played nine seasons in Oklahoma City before signing with Golden State in 2016, winning back-to-back championships in 2017 and 2018.

Durant was a heavily recruited high school prospect who was widely regarded as the second-best player in his class. In college, he won numerous year-end awards and became the first freshman to be named Naismith College Player of the Year. As a professional, he has won two NBA championships, an NBA Most Valuable Player Award, two Finals MVP Awards, two NBA All-Star Game Most Valuable Player Awards, four NBA scoring titles, the NBA Rookie of the Year Award, and two Olympic gold medals. Durant has also been selected to eight All-NBA teams and ten NBA All-Star teams.

Off the court, Durant is one of the highest-earning basketball players in the world, due in part to endorsement deals with companies such as Foot Locker and Nike. He has developed a reputation for philanthropy and regularly leads the league in All-Star votes and jersey sales. In recent years, he has contributed to The Players' Tribune as both a photographer and writer. In 2012, he ventured into acting, appearing in the film Thunderstruck.

Naismith Award

Naismith Award is a basketball award named after Dr. James Naismith, and awarded by the Atlanta Tipoff Club.

Naismith Awards include:

Naismith College Player of the Year (men's and women's; NCAA Division I basketball)

Naismith College Coach of the Year (men's and women's; NCAA Division I basketball)

Naismith Defensive Player of the Year (men's and women's; NCAA Division I basketball)

Naismith Prep Player of the Year (male and female)

Naismith Outstanding Contribution to Basketball (male or female; overall impact on basketball)

Naismith College Official of the Year (men's and women's)

Naismith Legacy Award, "presented to players, coaches and other individuals or organizations from the game of basketball honoring their role in furthering the values of honor, respect and integrity -- both on an [sic] off the court."Another "Naismith Award", defunct since 2013, was not administered by the Atlanta Tipoff Club, and was named after John Naismith's daughter-in-law Frances Pomeroy Naismith:

Frances Pomeroy Naismith Award — NCAA Division I basketball; men's award, handed out by the National Association of Basketball Coaches, was restricted to players no taller than 6 ft/1.83 m, and women's award, handed out by the Women's Basketball Coaches Association, was restricted to players no taller than 5 ft 8 in/1.73 m

Saudia Roundtree

Saudia Roundtree (born October 4, 1976 in Anderson, South Carolina) is an American women's basketball coach, and also a former star player. Roundtree attended Westside high School in Anderson, South Carolina, where she was named a High School All-American by the WBCA. She participated in the inaugural WBCA High School All-America Game in 1992, scoring ten points. She began her collegiate career at Kilgore College, where she captured National Junior College Player of the Year honors in 1994. She later transferred to the University of Georgia, where she was named an All-American and the Naismith College Player of the Year, USBWA Women's National Player of the Year, and WBCA Player of the Year in 1996. In 1996, Roundtree was named to the Final Four All Tournament team. Roundtree also received the Espy Award in 1997 for the Best Female College Basketball Player. She obtained a degree in sociology from Georgia.

After leaving UGA, Roundtree played three seasons in the American Basketball League, two with the Atlanta Glory and one with the Nashville Noise, and was an ABL All-Star. She started her coaching career at Morris Brown College in 2001 and then was the head women’s basketball coach North Carolina A&T University from 2002 to 2005. Roundtree spent 2005 on the coaching staff at the University of Alabama before becoming an assistant coach at University of Central Florida in 2006.

Seth Tuttle

Seth Tuttle (born September 5, 1992) is an American basketball player for Spirou Charleroi of the Belgian League. He had an All-American college career the University of Northern Iowa (UNI). Tuttle was considered one of the top college players in the country, and was a midseason finalist for the Naismith College Player of the Year award.

Shane Battier

Shane Courtney Battier (born September 9, 1978) is an American retired professional basketball player who played for various teams of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He has also been a member of the U.S. national basketball team.

Battier was born and raised in Birmingham, Michigan, and attended Detroit Country Day School in nearby Beverly Hills, where he won many awards including the 1997 Mr. Basketball award. He went on to play four years of college basketball at Duke, where he captured the 2001 National Championship and swept the major National Player of the Year awards. Battier was selected with the sixth overall pick of the 2001 NBA draft by the Vancouver Grizzlies (who soon became the Memphis Grizzlies). He was traded five years later to the Houston Rockets, and was then traded back to the Memphis Grizzlies during the 2010–2011 NBA season. He signed with the Miami Heat in 2011. His number has been retired by both Detroit Country Day School and Duke University. He has been recognized for his aggressive defense and has "routinely guarded the league's most dangerous offensive players". He is the only basketball player to have ever won both the Naismith Prep Player of the Year Award (1997) and the Naismith College Player of the Year (2001). Battier won two NBA championships with the Miami Heat in 2012 and 2013.

Men's college basketball awards (United States)
National players of the year
Individual awards
Conference players of the year
Head coach awards
Conference coaches of the year
Division awards
Other awards
Women's college basketball awards (United States)
Player awards
Coaching awards
Other individual awards
Conference players of the year
Conference coaches of the year
Naismith Men's College Player of the Year
Naismith Women's College Player of the Year

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