NHL lockout

The NHL lockout may refer to any of the four labour actions in the history of the National Hockey League:

See also

1994–95 NHL lockout

The 1994–95 NHL lockout was a lockout that came after a year of National Hockey League (NHL) hockey that was played without a collective bargaining agreement. The lockout was a subject of dispute as the players sought collective bargaining and owners sought to help franchises that had a weaker market as well as make sure they could cap the rising salaries of players. The lockout caused the 1994–95 season to be shortened to 48 games instead of 84, the shortest season in 53 years.

2004–05 Boston Bruins season

The 2004–05 Boston Bruins season was the Bruins' 81st National Hockey League season, its games were cancelled as the 2004–05 NHL lockout could not be resolved in time.

2004–05 Calgary Flames season

The 2004–05 Calgary Flames season was the 25th National Hockey League season in Calgary, its games were cancelled as the 2004–05 NHL lockout could not be resolved in time. As a result, the Flames were unable to raise their Western Conference Championship banner until the start of 2005–06 season.

2004–05 Chicago Blackhawks season

The 2004–05 Chicago Blackhawks season was the 79th National Hockey League season, its games were cancelled as the 2004–05 NHL lockout could not be resolved in time.

2004–05 Elitserien season

The 2004–05 Elitserien season was the 30th season of Elitserien. It started on September 20, 2004, with the regular season ending March 1, 2005. The playoffs of the 81st Swedish Championship ended on April 11, with Frölunda HC taking the championship.

2004–05 Los Angeles Kings season

The 2004–05 Los Angeles Kings season would have been the King's 38th season of play in the National Hockey League (NHL). However, the 2004–05 NHL lockout cancelled all of the scheduled games for the season.

2004–05 NHL lockout

The 2004–05 NHL lockout was a lockout that resulted in the cancellation of what would have been the 88th season of play of the National Hockey League (NHL). It was the first time the Stanley Cup was not awarded since 1919, the first time a major professional sports league in North America canceled a complete season because of a labor dispute, and the second time after the 1994–1995 MLB strike that the postseason of a major professional sports league in North America was canceled. The lockout lasted 10 months and 6 days starting September 16, 2004, the day after the collective bargaining agreement (CBA) between the NHL and the NHL Players Association (NHLPA) that resolved the 1994–95 lockout expired.

The lockout of the 2004–2005 season resulted in 1,230 unplayed games. The negotiating teams reached an agreement on July 13, 2005, and the lockout officially ended 9 days later on July 22, after both the NHL owners and players ratified the CBA.

2004–05 New Jersey Devils season

The 2004–05 New Jersey Devils season was the team's 23rd season in the National Hockey League since the franchise relocated to New Jersey. However, the 2004–05 NHL lockout prevented the season's games from occurring.

2004–05 New York Rangers season

The 2004–05 New York Rangers season was their 79th National Hockey League season; however, its games were cancelled as the 2004–05 NHL lockout could not be resolved in time.

2004–05 Ottawa Senators season

The 2004–05 Ottawa Senators season was the 13th season of the Ottawa Senators of the National Hockey League (NHL). All games were cancelled due to the 2004–05 NHL lockout, which cancelled play for the entire League. Several of the Senators' players played for teams in European hockey leagues while some played for the Senators' American Hockey League (AHL) affiliate, the Binghamton Senators.

2004–05 Pittsburgh Penguins season

The 2004–05 Pittsburgh Penguins season was the franchise's 38th season in the National Hockey League, however, due to the 2004–05 NHL lockout no games were played.

2004–05 Washington Capitals season

The 2004–05 Washington Capitals season was their 31st National Hockey League season. Its games were cancelled as the 2004–05 NHL lockout could not be resolved in time. As a result, Alexander Ovechkin would not make his NHL debut until the start of the 2005–06 season.

2009 Clarkson Cup

The 2009 Clarkson Cup was contested at the K-Rock Centre in Kingston, Ontario. The Minnesota Whitecaps competed versus the Montreal Stars in the championship game. It was the first time that the Clarkson Cup was contested. At the time of the NHL lockout, Adrienne Clarkson suggested that women should play for the Stanley Cup.

2012–13 NHL lockout

The 2012–13 NHL lockout was a labour dispute between the National Hockey League (NHL) and the National Hockey League Players' Association (NHLPA) that began at 11:59 pm EDT on September 15, 2012. A tentative deal on a new collective bargaining agreement (CBA) was reached on January 6, 2013, with its ratification and signing of a memorandum of understanding on the agreement completed by January 12, 2013, 119 days after the expiry of the previous CBA.The owners of the league's franchises, led by NHL commissioner Gary Bettman, declared a lockout of the members of the NHLPA after a new agreement could not be reached before the expiry of the NHL collective bargaining agreement on September 16, 2012. The lockout shortened the 2012–13 NHL season, originally scheduled to begin on October 11, 2012, from 82 to 48 games, a reduction of 41.5 percent. The revised season started on January 19, 2013 and ended on April 28, 2013.At issue for the owners were desires to reduce the players guaranteed 57% share of hockey-related revenues, introduce term limits on contracts, eliminate salary arbitration, and change free agency rules. The union's initial offers focused on increased revenue sharing between owners and a fixed salary cap that is not linked to league revenues. As the deadline for a work stoppage approached, the union unsuccessfully challenged the league's ability to lock out players of three Canadian teams – the Edmonton Oilers and Calgary Flames (in the jurisdiction of Alberta), and the Montreal Canadiens (in the jurisdiction of Quebec).

The dispute was the third lockout in the 19 years since Bettman became Commissioner in 1993, following player lockouts in 1994–95 and 2004–05, with the latter case leading to the cancellation of the entire season. This was also the third labour dispute for NHLPA executive director Donald Fehr who, as head of the Major League Baseball Players' Association, led his union through a lockout in 1990 and a strike in 1994–95.

During the lockout, many NHL players went to other leagues in North America and Europe. Many businesses in the United States and Canada located near NHL arenas lost money as a result of the games not played.

Hamburg Freezers

The Hamburg Freezers were a German professional men's ice hockey club from Hamburg, Germany that played in the Deutsche Eishockey Liga. The club announced its withdrawal from the DEL and ceased operations on May 24, 2016 when Anschutz Entertainment Group, who owned both the Freezers and Eisbären Berlin, felt it was no longer financially viable to own two teams within the same hockey league.The Freezers were originally known as the Munich Barons from 1999 until 2002, before team owner Philip Anschutz relocated the franchise to Hamburg for financial reasons on June 3, 2002. The club was renamed as the Hamburg Freezers. Their German nickname was Eisschränke (iceboxes).

The team's official colours were crystal blue and white and they played their home games in the Barclaycard Arena Hamburg.

Goaltender Jean-Sébastien Giguère suited up for the Freezers during the 2004–05 NHL lockout season. Giguère played six games for Hamburg and posted a .925 save percentage, with a goals against average of 2.39.

During the 2012–13 NHL lockout, Dallas Stars forward Jamie Benn lined up for the Freezers in 19 games, amassing 7 goals and 13 assists, earning him a player of the month award for November.

John Kelly (sportscaster)

John Kelly (born July 25th, 1960 in Ottawa, Ontario) is a hockey play-by-play broadcast announcer. He is the son of the late Dan Kelly. Kelly joined his father in the broadcast booth, for a game in November 1988, as Dan Kelly announced his final game, in which the Blues defeated the Flyers for the first time in Philadelphia since January 6, 1972. Kelly joined the Blues' broadcast team for the 1989-90 season and remained on the job until 1992, when he joined the then-fledgling Tampa Bay Lightning.Three years later, he then joined the Colorado Avalanche, who were moving from Quebec, where they had spent 23 seasons as the Nordiques. He documented two Stanley Cup Championships in Denver, in 1995–96 and again in 2000–01. He became well known in Denver for his proclamation, "Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!!" after a big score by the Avs and,"SAVE BY ROY!" after a good save from former Avalanche goaltender Patrick Roy. He left the Avalanche after the 2003–04 season to rejoin the Blues on their telecasts. After the 2004–05 NHL lockout, he finally got the chance for the second time in 2005–06.

His younger brother Dan P. Kelly was the Blues' radio announcer from 1997 to 2000, before spending the next four seasons with the Columbus Blue Jackets.In addition to the Blues, Kelly also worked the 2006 NHL Playoffs on Outdoor Life Network (now NBCSN). During the mid-1990s, he worked on some regional telecasts for the NHL on Fox. Kelly substituted for Mike Haynes, the broadcaster who took over his play-by-play role for the Avalanche, on Altitude Sports and Entertainment during the 2008 playoffs due to Haynes' health problems.

Kelly, whose minor league hockey assignments included the St. Catharines Saints and three years with the Adirondack Red Wings, obtained his realtor license during the 2004–05 NHL lockout. He also subbed for Marv Albert on Rangers broadcasts during the late 1980s.

List of Dallas Stars seasons

This is a list of seasons completed by the Dallas Stars team of the National Hockey League. This list documents the records and playoff results for all seasons the Stars have completed in the NHL since 1993. The franchise relocated in 1993 from Minnesota, where it was the Minnesota North Stars. Since moving to Dallas, the team has made the playoffs in 14 of its 23 seasons of play. The Stars won the Stanley Cup in 1999.

Note: GP = Games played, OTL = Overtime Losses, GF = Goals for, GA = Goals against

1 Season was shortened due to the 1994–95 NHL lockout.

2 Season was cancelled due to the 2004–05 NHL lockout.

3 As of the 2005–06 NHL season, all games tied after overtime will be decided in a shootout; SOL (Shootout losses) will be recorded as OTL in the standings.

4 Season was shortened due to the 2012–13 NHL lockout.

List of Ottawa Senators seasons

This is the list of all regular-season and playoff results of the Ottawa Senators (1992–present) ice hockey club of the National Hockey League. Individual NHL and team season articles can be accessed by links under the 'Season' and 'Team' columns of the table. The team has qualified for the Stanley Cup playoffs 16 times and has not yet won a championship.

The Senators were granted a franchise in 1990. The team participated in the 1992 Expansion Draft and the 1992 NHL Entry Draft and began play in the 1992–93 season. Until 1996, the Senators played out of the Ottawa Civic Centre. In 1996, the Senators opened the new Palladium, since renamed the Corel Centre, Scotiabank Place and Canadian Tire Centre. The team finished last overall in the league during its first four seasons. After a turnover in management and head coach, the Senators qualified for the first time for the Stanley Cup playoffs in 1997.

The Senators won the President's Trophy in the 2002–03 season for placing first in the league overall during the regular season. The team was defeated in the Eastern Conference Final. During the 2004–05 NHL season, the team operated its affiliated teams and office, but the team itself did not play due to the lockout. The team advanced to the Stanley Cup Final in the 2006–07 season but lost in five games. In 2016–17, the Senators advanced to the Eastern Conference Final again, but lost in the seventh game in double overtime.

Note: GP = Games played, W = Wins, L = Losses, T = Ties, OTL = Overtime Losses, Pts = Points, GF = Goals For, GA = Goals Against, PIM = Penalties In Minutes

a The season was shortened to 48 games because of the 1994–95 NHL lockout.

b Beginning with the 1999–2000 season, teams received one point for losing a regular-season game in overtime.

c The season was cancelled because of the 2004–05 NHL lockout.

d Prior to the 2005–06 season, the NHL instituted a penalty shootout for regular-season games that remained tied after a five-minute overtime period, which prevented ties.

e The season was shortened to 48 games because of the 2012–13 NHL lockout.1 Totals through the 2018–19 season

2 Totals through the 2018–19 season

3 Totals through the 2018–19 season

List of St. Louis Blues seasons

This is a list of seasons completed by the St. Louis Blues of the National Hockey League. This list documents the records and playoff results for all seasons the Blues have completed in the NHL since their inception in 1967.

Note: GP = Games played, W = Wins, L = Losses, T = Ties, OTL = Overtime losses, Pts = Points, GF = Goals for, GA = Goals against

1 Season was shortened due to the 1994–95 NHL lockout.

2 As of the 2005–06 NHL season, all games will have a winner; the OTL column includes SOL (Shootout losses).

3 Season was shortened due to the 2012–13 NHL lockout.

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