NGC 6251

NGC 6251 is an active supergiant elliptical radio galaxy in the constellation Ursa Minor, and is more than 340 million light-years away from Earth. The galaxy has a Seyfert 2 active galactic nucleus,[3] and is one of the most extreme examples of a Seyfert galaxy. This galaxy may be associated with gamma-ray source 3EG J1621+8203, which has high-energy gamma-ray emission.[3] It is also noted for its one-sided radio jet—one of the brightest known—discovered in 1977.[4] The supermassive black hole at the core has a mass of (5.9±2.0)×108 M.[5]

NGC 6251
NGC 6251HST
Hubble image of the heart of the active galaxy NGC 6251
Observation data (J2000 epoch)
Right ascension 16h 32m 31.9700s[1]
Declination+82° 32′ 16.400″[1]
Redshift0.02471[1]
Distance340 million light-years[2]
Apparent magnitude (V)14.3[3]
Characteristics
TypeE[1]
Apparent size (V)1.82´X1.55´
Other designations
NGC 6251, UGC 10501, LEDA 58472, 6C 1636+8239, QSO B1637+826

References

  1. ^ a b c d "NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database". Results for NGC 6251. Retrieved 2006-10-26.
  2. ^ "Distance and Length". Online-Unit-Converter.com. Archived from the original on 2010-03-30. Retrieved 2010-03-29.
  3. ^ a b c SIMBAD
  4. ^ Perley, R. A.; Bridle, A. H.; Willis, A. G. (1984). "High-resolution VLA Observations of the Radio Jet in NGC 6251". Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series. 54: 291–334. Bibcode:1984ApJS...54..291P. doi:10.1086/190931.
  5. ^ Graham, Alister W. (November 2008), "Populating the Galaxy Velocity Dispersion - Supermassive Black Hole Mass Diagram: A Catalogue of (Mbh, σ) Values", Publications of the Astronomical Society of Australia, 25 (4): 167–175, arXiv:0807.2549, Bibcode:2008PASA...25..167G, doi:10.1071/AS08013.

External links

List of black holes

This is a list of black holes (and stars considered probable candidates) organized by size (including black holes of undetermined mass); some items in this list are galaxies or star clusters that are believed to be organized around a black hole. Messier and New General Catalogue designations are given where possible.

Seyfert galaxy

Seyfert galaxies are one of the two largest groups of active galaxies, along with quasars. They have quasar-like nuclei (very luminous, distant and bright sources of electromagnetic radiation) with very high surface brightnesses whose spectra reveal strong, high-ionisation emission lines, but unlike quasars, their host galaxies are clearly detectable.Seyfert galaxies account for about 10% of all galaxies and are some of the most intensely studied objects in astronomy, as they are thought to be powered by the same phenomena that occur in quasars, although they are closer and less luminous than quasars. These galaxies have supermassive black holes at their centers which are surrounded by accretion discs of in-falling material. The accretion discs are believed to be the source of the observed ultraviolet radiation. Ultraviolet emission and absorption lines provide the best diagnostics for the composition of the surrounding material.Seen in visible light, most Seyfert galaxies look like normal spiral galaxies, but when studied under other wavelengths, it becomes clear that the luminosity of their cores is of comparable intensity to the luminosity of whole galaxies the size of the Milky Way.Seyfert galaxies are named after Carl Seyfert, who first described this class in 1943.

Ursa Minor

Ursa Minor (Latin: "Lesser Bear", contrasting with Ursa Major), also known as the Little Bear, is a constellation in the Northern Sky. Like the Great Bear, the tail of the Little Bear may also be seen as the handle of a ladle, hence the North American name, Little Dipper: seven stars with four in its bowl like its partner the Big Dipper. It was one of the 48 constellations listed by the 2nd-century astronomer Ptolemy, and remains one of the 88 modern constellations. Ursa Minor has traditionally been important for navigation, particularly by mariners, because of Polaris being the North Star.

Polaris, the brightest star in the constellation, is a yellow-white supergiant and the brightest Cepheid variable star in the night sky, ranging from an apparent magnitude of 1.97 to 2.00. Beta Ursae Minoris, also known as Kochab, is an aging star that has swollen and cooled to become an orange giant with an apparent magnitude of 2.08, only slightly fainter than Polaris. Kochab and magnitude 3 Gamma Ursae Minoris have been called the "guardians of the pole star". Planets have been detected orbiting four of the stars, including Kochab. The constellation also contains an isolated neutron star—Calvera—and H1504+65, the hottest white dwarf yet discovered, with a surface temperature of 200,000 K.

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