NGC 5307

NGC 5307 is a planetary nebula located in the constellation Centaurus.

NGC 5307
Nebula
NGC 5307 (HST, instrument WFPC2)
A Hubble Space Telescope (HST) image of NGC 5307.
Credit: HST/NASA/ESA.
Observation data: J2000 epoch
Right ascension 13h 51m 3.3s[1]
Declination−51° 12′ 20.7″[1]
ConstellationCentaurus
DesignationsESO 221-11[1]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c "NGC 5307". SIMBAD. Centre de données astronomiques de Strasbourg. Retrieved 2007-04-08.

External links

Chi Centauri

Chi Centauri (χ Cen, χ Centauri) is a star in the constellation Centaurus.

χ Centauri is a blue-white B-type main sequence dwarf with a mean apparent magnitude of +4.36. It is approximately 510 light years from Earth. It is classified as a Beta Cephei type variable star and its brightness varies by 0.02 magnitudes with a period of 50.40 minutes.

This star is a proper motion member of the Upper-Centaurus Lupus sub-group in the

Scorpius-Centaurus OB association,

the nearest such co-moving association of massive stars to the Sun.

List of planetary nebulae

The following is an incomplete list of known planetary nebulae.

Rho Centauri

Rho Centauri (ρ Cen, ρ Centauri) is a star in the southern constellation of Centaurus. ρ Centauri is a blue-white B-type main sequence dwarf with an apparent magnitude of +3.94. It is approximately 380 light years from Earth.

This star is a proper motion member of the Lower-Centaurus Crux sub-group in the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association, the nearest such association of co-moving massive stars to the Sun.

Sigma Centauri

Sigma Centauri, Latinized from σ Centauri, is the Bayer designation for a solitary star in the southern constellation of Centaurus. It is visible to the naked eye with an apparent visual magnitude of 3.91. A visual companion at an angular separation of 88.11±0.37 mas along a position angle of 14.33°±2.59° was detected in 2010 using interferometry, but its association with Sigma Centauri remains undetermined as of 2013. The distance to Sigma Centauri, based upon an annual parallax shift of 7.92 mas, is around 412 light years.

This is a B-type main sequence star with a stellar classification of B3 V. It is a helium-rich star, the most massive type of chemically peculiar star. Sigma Centauri has around 6.8 times the mass of the Sun and 4.5 times the Sun's radius. It has a relatively high rate of spin with a projected rotational velocity of 169 km/s, and is around 25 million years old. The star radiates 1,101 times the solar luminosity from its outer atmosphere at an effective temperature of 15,744 K. It is a member of the Lower Centaurus Crux component of the Scorpius–Centaurus Association.

Tau Centauri

Tau Centauri, Latinized from τ Centauri, is a solitary star in the southern constellation of Centaurus. It is visible to the naked eye with an apparent visual magnitude of +3.86. The distance to this star, based upon an annual parallax shift of 24.85 mas, is 131 light years. There is a 98% chance that it is a co-moving companion of Gamma Centauri; the two stars have an estimated separation of 1.7 ly (0.53 pc).This is an A-type star with stellar classifications of A0 V or A1 IVnn, indicating it may be a main sequence star or a more evolved subgiant star. It is around 132 million years old and is spinning rapidly with a projected rotational velocity of 296.8 km/s. This is giving the star an oblate shape, with an estimated equatorial girth that is 30% larger than the polar radius. The star has an estimated 2.3 times the mass of the Sun and 2.2 times the Sun's radius.

Upsilon2 Centauri

Upsilon2 Centauri (υ2 Centauri) is a binary star system in the southern constellation Centaurus. It is visible to the naked eye with an apparent visual magnitude of +4.33. Based upon an annual parallax shift of just 2.57 mas as seen from Earth, this star is located roughly 1,300 light years from the Sun. Relative to its neighbors, the system has a peculiar velocity of 39.2+8.8−15.2 km/s and it may form a runaway star system.This is a single-lined spectroscopic binary star system with an orbital period of 207.357 days and an eccentricity of 0.55. The primary component has the spectrum of an evolved F-type giant/bright giant hybrid with a stellar classification of F7 II/III. It is around 46 million years old with 6.9 times the mass of the Sun. The star is radiating 3,919 times the Sun's luminosity from its photosphere at an effective temperature of 6,495 K.

Xi1 Centauri

Xi1 Centauri, Latinized from ξ1 Centauri, is a solitary star in the southern constellation of Centaurus. It is visible to the naked eye with an apparent visual magnitude of +4.83. With an annual parallax shift of 14.79 mas, it is located around 221 light years from the Sun. At that distance, the apparent visual magnitude of the star is diminished by an interstellar extinction factor of 0.10 due to intervening dust. Just 17 arc minutes to the east of Xi1 Centauri lies the galaxy NGC 4945.This is an A-type main sequence star with a stellar classification of A0 V. It is about 125 million years old with a relatively high rate of spin, having a projected rotational velocity of 185 km/s. The star has an estimated 2.4 times the mass of the Sun and about 2.7 times the Sun's radius. It is radiating 43 times the solar luminosity from its outer atmosphere at an effective temperature of 10,462 K.

Xi2 Centauri

Xi2 Centauri, Latinized from ξ2 Centauri, is a triple star system in the southern constellation of Centaurus. It is visible to the naked eye with an apparent visual magnitude of 4.30, and forms a wide double star with the slightly dimmer ξ1 Centauri. Based upon an annual parallax shift of 6.98 mas, Xi2 Centauri lies roughly 470 light years from the Sun. At that distance, the visual magnitude is diminished by an interstellar extinction factor of 0.32 due to intervening dust.This system was discovered to be a single-lined spectroscopic binary in 1910 by American astronomer Joseph Haines Moore. The pair, component A, orbit each other with a period of 7.6497 days and an eccentricity of 0.35. The primary is a B-type star with a stellar classification of B1.5 V or B2 IV, depending on the source. This indicates it may be a main sequence star or a more evolved subgiant star. It has about 8.1 times the mass of the Sun and radiates 1,702 times the solar luminosity from its outer atmosphere at an effective temperature of 20,790 K.A third star, component B, is a magnitude 9.38 F-type main sequence star with a classification of F7 V. It has 1.25 times the mass of the Sun and radiates 2.4 times the solar luminosity at an effective temperature of 6,194 K. It lies at an angular separation of 25.1 arc seconds from the inner pair. They share a common proper motion, indicating they may be gravitationally bound with an orbital period of around 41,000 years.The system has a peculiar velocity of 16.2±4.2 km/s. It belongs to the Scorpius–Centaurus Association and appears to be a member of the Gould's Belt.

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