NGC 5011

NGC 5011 is an elliptical galaxy in the constellation of Centaurus.[2] It was discovered on 3 June 1834 by John Herschel.[4] It was described as "pretty bright, considerably small, round, among 4 stars" by John Louis Emil Dreyer, the compiler of the New General Catalogue.[4]

NGC 5011
Potw1253a
HST image of NGC 5011B (right) and NGC 5011C (left)
Observation data (J2000 epoch)
ConstellationCentaurus
Right ascension 13h 12m 51.848s[1]
Declination−43° 05′ 46.25″[1]
Redshift0.010537[2]
Helio radial velocity3159 km/s[2]
Distance133.26 ± 18.56 Mly (40.857 ± 5.692 Mpc)[2]
Apparent magnitude (V)11.33[3]
Apparent magnitude (B)12.14[3]
Characteristics
TypeE1-2[2]
Size92,800 ly (28,440 pc)[2][note 1]
Apparent size (V)1.763′ × 1.552′[1][note 1]
Other designations
MGC-07-27-042, PGC 45898[3]

Optical companions

Several galaxies are not physically associated with NGC 5011, but appear close to NGC 5011 in the night sky. PGC 45847 is a spiral galaxy that is also known as NGC 5011A.[5] PGC 45918 is a lenticular galaxy[6] some 156 million light-years away from the Earth, in the Centaurus Cluster, and is designated NGC 5011B.[7] PGC 45917 is a dwarf galaxy, also designated NGC 5011C.[8][7] Although NGC 5011B and 5011C appear close together, they are no signs of them interacting.[7] NGC 5011C is actually much closer and is in the Centaurus A/M83 Group, at 13 million light years away.[7]

References

  1. ^ a b c Skrutskie, M. (2006). "The Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS)". The Astronomical Journal. 131 (2): 1163–1183. Bibcode:2006AJ....131.1163S. doi:10.1086/498708.
  2. ^ a b c d e f "NED results for object NGC 5011". National Aeronautics and Space Administration / Infrared Processing and Analysis Center. Retrieved 6 September 2017.
  3. ^ a b c "NGC 5011". SIMBAD. Centre de données astronomiques de Strasbourg. Retrieved 6 September 2017.
  4. ^ a b "New General Catalog Objects: NGC 5000 - 5059". cseligman.com. Retrieved 6 September 2017.
  5. ^ "LEDA 45847". SIMBAD. Centre de données astronomiques de Strasbourg. Retrieved 6 September 2017.
  6. ^ "LEDA 45848". SIMBAD. Centre de données astronomiques de Strasbourg. Retrieved 6 September 2017.
  7. ^ a b c d "Don't trust your eyes | ESA/Hubble". www.spacetelescope.org. 2012. Retrieved 6 September 2017.
  8. ^ "LEDA 45917". SIMBAD. Centre de données astronomiques de Strasbourg. Retrieved 6 September 2017.

Notes

  1. ^ a b 2MASS KS values used.

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