NGC 4477

NGC 4477 is a barred lenticular galaxy[2][3] located about 55 million light-years away[4] in the constellation of Coma Berenices.[5] NGC 4477 is classified as a type 2 seyfert galaxy.[2] The galaxy was discovered by astronomer William Herschel on April 8, 1784.[6] NGC 4477 is a member of Markarian's Chain which forms part of the larger Virgo Cluster.[7]

NGC 4477
SDSS NGC 4477
SDSS image of NGC 4477.
Observation data (J2000 epoch)
ConstellationComa Berenices
Right ascension 12h 30m 02.2s[1]
Declination13° 38′ 12″[1]
Redshift0.004463/1338 km/s[1]
Distance54.8 Mly
Group or clusterVirgo Cluster
Apparent magnitude (V)11.38[1]
Characteristics
TypeSB0(s) [1]
Size~69,340 ly (estimated)[1]
Apparent size (V)3.8 x 3.5[1]
Other designations
CGCG 70-129, IRAS 12275+1354, MCG 2-32-97, PGC 41260, UGC 7638, VCC 1253[1]

Physical characteristics

NGC 4477 has a very well-defined bar which is imbedded within an extensive lens-like envelope. It has a fairly sharp edge and is slightly enhanced near the rim, and is classified as a ring-like feature. Surrounding the ring, two broad, diffuse incomplete arcs appear to bracket the galaxy around the bar. In NGC 4477, it is suggested that the galaxy has a highly evolved double ring morphology. Also, both ring features are exceedingly washed out.[3]

See also

Other Images

ESO-M87

Image of the central region of the Virgo cluster of galaxies. NGC 4477 is at the edge of the upper-left central portion of the image.

NGC 4477 cutout hst 12500 18 wfc3 uvis f814w sci

Hubble Image of the central region of NGC 4477.

External links

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database". Results for NGC 4477. Retrieved 2017-08-02.
  2. ^ a b "Your NED Search Results". ned.ipac.caltech.edu. Retrieved 2017-08-03.
  3. ^ a b "NGC 4477 - (RL)SB0/a". The De Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxies. Retrieved 2017-08-03.
  4. ^ HO, LUIS C.; SARZI, MARC; RIX, HANS-WALTER; SHIELDS, JOSEPH C.; RUDNICK, GREG; FILIPPENKO, ALEXEI V.; BARTH, AARON J. (30 October 2001). "AN EFFICIENT STRATEGY TO SELECT TARGETS FOR GAS-DYNAMICAL MEASUREMENTS OF BLACK HOLE MASSES USING THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE". Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific. 114 (792): 137–143. arXiv:astro-ph/0110671. doi:10.1086/338546.
  5. ^ Rojas, Sebastián García. "Galaxy NGC 4477 - Galaxy in Coma Berenices Constellation · Deep Sky Objects Browser". DSO Browser. Retrieved 2017-08-03.
  6. ^ "New General Catalog Objects: NGC 4450 - 4499". cseligman.com. Retrieved 2017-08-01.
  7. ^ "Exploring the Coma-Virgo Cloud" (PDF). GEMINI. 2:12: 1–9. April 1978.
Herschel 400 Catalogue

The Herschel 400 catalogue is a subset of William Herschel's original Catalogue of Nebulae and Clusters of Stars, selected by Brenda F. Guzman (Branchett), Lydel Guzman, Paul Jones, James Morrison, Peggy Taylor and Sara Saey of the Ancient City Astronomy Club in St. Augustine, Florida, United States c. 1980. They decided to generate the list after reading a letter published in Sky & Telescope by James Mullaney of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.In this letter Mr. Mullaney suggested that William Herschel's original catalogue of 2,500 objects would be an excellent basis for deep sky object selection for amateur astronomers looking for a challenge after completing the Messier Catalogue.

The Herschel 400 is a subset of John Herschel's General Catalogue of Nebulae and Clusters published in 1864 of 5,000 objects, and hence also of the New General Catalogue.

The catalogue forms the basis of the Astronomical League's Herschel 400 club. In 1997, another subset of 400 Herschel objects was selected by the Rose City Astronomers of Portland, Oregon as the Herschel II list, which forms the basis of the Astronomical League's Herschel II Program.

LEDA 83677

LEDA 83677 is a lenticular galaxy located about 290 million light-years away in the constellation Coma Berenices. It is a member of the Coma cluster of galaxies. LEDA 83677 is also classified as a type 1 Seyfert galaxy. The core of the galaxy is emitting high-energy X-rays and ultraviolet light, probably caused by a massive black hole lurking in the core.

Markarian's Chain

Markarian's Chain is a stretch of galaxies that forms part of the Virgo Cluster. When viewed from Earth, the galaxies lie along a smoothly curved line. Charles Messier first discovered two of the galaxies, M84 and M86, in 1781. The other galaxies seen in the chain were first mentioned in John Louis Emil Dreyer's New General Catalogue, published in 1888. It was ultimately named after the Armenian astrophysicist, Benjamin Markarian, who discovered their common motion in the early 1960s. Member galaxies include M84 (NGC 4374), M86 (NGC 4406), NGC 4477, NGC 4473, NGC 4461, NGC 4458, NGC 4438 and NGC 4435. It is located at RA 12h 27m and Dec +13° 10′.

The bright members of the chain are visible through small telescopes. Larger telescopes can be used to view the fainter galaxies.At least seven galaxies in the chain appear to move coherently, although others appear to be superposed by chance. Six of the points on the chain can be marked by galaxies. The other two points are pairs of galaxies.

NGC 4267

NGC 4267 is a barred lenticular galaxy located about 55 million light-years away in the constellation Virgo. It was discovered by astronomer William Herschel on Apr 17, 1784 and is a member of the Virgo Cluster.

NGC 4479

NGC 4479 is a barred lenticular galaxy located about 60 million light-years away in the constellation of Coma Berenices. NGC 4479 was discovered by astronomer William Herschel on April 8, 1784. It is a member of the Virgo Cluster.

NGC 4608

NGC 4608 is a barred lenticular galaxy located about 56 million light-years away in the constellation of Virgo. The galaxy was discovered by astronomer William Herschel on March 15, 1784. It is a member of the Virgo Cluster.

NGC 4733

NGC 4733 is a barred lenticular galaxy located about 55 million light-years away in the constellation of Virgo. NGC 4733 was discovered by astronomer William Herschel on March 15, 1784. NGC 4733 is a member of the Virgo Cluster.

NGC 4754

NGC 4754 is a barred lenticular galaxy located about 53 million light-years away in the constellation of Virgo. NGC 4754 was discovered by astronomer William Herschel on March 15, 1784. It forms a non-interacting pair with the edge-on lenticular galaxy NGC 4762. NGC 4754 is a member of the Virgo Cluster.

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