NFL competition committee

The National Football League Competition Committee was created in 1968 following the announcement of the AFL-NFL merger. It replaced the NFL Rules Committee, which was formed in 1932 when the NFL adopted its own rulebook. Prior to 1932 the NFL used the college rulebook.

Members of the Competition Committee are chosen by the NFL commissioner. The members are:[1]

References

  1. ^ "The NFL Competition Committee". NFL.com. Retrieved 7 December 2017.

External links

1982 Dallas Cowboys season

The 1982 Dallas Cowboys season was the franchise's 23rd season in the National Football League. The Cowboys finished with a record of 6 wins and 3 losses, placing them second in the NFC. After losing the season opener to the Pittsburgh Steelers (the first time the Cowboys lost a season opener in 17 years), the Cowboys won the next six, including five after the strike had ended. However, two losses at the end of the regular season cost them home-field advantage throughout the playoffs. After beginning their playoff run with victories over the Buccaneers and the Packers, the Cowboys traveled to Washington, where they met defeat at the hands of their arch-rival, the Redskins. It was the third straight season that the Cowboys lost in the NFC championship game. The Redskins would advance to win the Super Bowl.The Cowboys featured big-play capability on both sides of the ball in 1982. The offense relied on running back Tony Dorsett, who led the NFC in rushing (and during the season set an NFL record with a 99-yard run from scrimmage against Minnesota), and quarterback Danny White, who finished second in the NFL in passer rating. Despite the retirement of longtime starters Charlie Waters and D.D. Lewis before the season, the Cowboys still tied for the NFC lead in sacks, and cornerback Everson Walls led the league with seven interceptions.The Cowboys were the only team to defeat the Washington Redskins in the 1982 season, winning a regular season matchup in Game 5. The Cowboys were also the only team in the NFL who never trailed at halftime in '82.

Bert Emanuel

Bert Tyrone Emanuel (born October 26, 1970) is a former American football wide receiver in the National Football League. He was drafted by the Atlanta Falcons in the second round of the 1994 NFL Draft. He played college football at Rice.

Emanuel also played for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Miami Dolphins, New England Patriots, and Detroit Lions.

Chad Clifton

Jeffrey Chad Clifton (born June 26, 1976) is a former American football offensive tackle for the Green Bay Packers of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for the University of Tennessee, and was drafted by the Green Bay Packers in the second round of the 2000 NFL Draft. With the Packers, he won Super Bowl XLV over the Pittsburgh Steelers.

False start

In sports, a false start is a movement by a participant before (or in some cases after) being signaled or otherwise permitted by the rules to start. Depending on the sport and the event, a false start can result in a penalty against the athlete's or team's field position, a warning that a subsequent false start will result in disqualification, or immediate disqualification of the athlete from further competition.

False starts are common in racing sports (such as swimming, track, sprinting, and motor sports), where differences are made by fractions of a second and where anxiety to get the best start plays a role in the athletes' behavior.

A race that is started cleanly, on the contrary, is referred to as a fair start or clean start.

Isaac Curtis

Isaac Fisher Curtis (born October 20, 1950) is a former professional American football wide receiver who played his entire National Football League career with the Cincinnati Bengals (1973–1984).

Jeff Fisher

Jeffrey Michael "Jeff" Fisher (born February 25, 1958) is a former American football coach and player. He served as a head coach in the National Football League (NFL) for 22 seasons, primarily with the Houston / Tennessee Oilers / Titans franchise. He coached the Titans for 17 seasons and the St Louis / Los Angeles Rams for five seasons.

Fisher became the coach of the Titans towards the end of the 1994 season during their tenure as the Houston Oilers and was the team's first coach when they relocated to Tennessee. He continued to coach the Titans until after the end of the 2010 season when the Titans and Fisher mutually agreed to part ways. Following a season away from football, Fisher was hired as the head coach of the Rams in 2012 and coached the team during their last four years in St. Louis. He remained the head coach of the Rams during the franchise's return to Los Angeles in 2016, but was fired near the end of the season.Fisher's most successful season was in 1999, when he led the Titans to the franchise's first (and only) Super Bowl appearance in XXXIV, which ended in close defeat by the St. Louis Rams for their first Super Bowl title. However, despite compiling a winning record as a head coach, Fisher's career has been noted for an overall lack of success, having only obtained six winning seasons and postseason appearances in over two decades in the NFL. He holds the record for the most regular-season losses by an NFL head coach at 165, tied with Dan Reeves.

Jim Irsay

James Irsay (born June 13, 1959) is the owner and CEO of the Indianapolis Colts of the National Football League.

John Mara

John K. Mara, Esq ( MAR-ə (born December 1, 1954) is the president, CEO, and co-owner of the New York Giants.

Mason Espinosa

Mason Espinosa is a professional American football quarterback for the Albany Empire of the Arena Football League (AFL). He has also played for the Erie Explosion and the Billings Wolves. Espinosa played college football for Ohio Wesleyan University. He currently holds 17 individual Ohio Wesleyan records, as well as being the all-time North Coast Athletic Conference (NCAC) career leader in passing yards and total yards, while also setting a single season NCAC record for completions.He was also an assistant football coach at Granville, Ohio-based Denison University, for the 2016-17 and 2017-18 seasons.

Matt Millen

Matthew George Millen (born March 12, 1958) is an American former National Football League linebacker and former executive. Millen played for the Oakland Raiders, the San Francisco 49ers and the Washington Redskins. In Millen's 12-year NFL playing career, he played on four teams that won the Super Bowl. Millen won a Super Bowl ring with each of the three teams for which he played; moreover, he won a Super Bowl ring in each of the four cities in which he played (the Raiders won championships in both Oakland and Los Angeles during his tenure).After his playing career, Millen was President and chief executive officer of the Detroit Lions from 2001 until week 4 of the 2008 NFL season. His eight-year tenure as head of the franchise led to the worst eight-year record in the history of the modern NFL (31-84, a .270 winning percentage), and resulted in his termination on September 24, 2008. Millen assembled the personnel and coaching staff of the 2008 Lions, which became the first team to go 0-16. This was the sole worst single-season record in league history until it was tied by the 2017 Cleveland Browns. He is generally regarded as the worst, or one of the worst, general managers in the history of modern sports.Following his NFL career, he was a football commentator for several national television and radio networks. His last job before joining the Lions was as a member of the number two broadcast team for NFL on Fox, as well as being the color commentator for Monday Night Football on Westwood One. On February 1, 2009, he joined the NBC broadcast team for pre-game analysis of Super Bowl XLIII. He has also been employed by ESPN as an NFL and college football analyst, and by NFL Network as a color commentator on Thursday Night Football. In 2015, Millen returned to Fox NFL and debuted on Big Ten Network.

NFL Scouting Combine

The NFL Scouting Combine is a week-long showcase occurring every February at Lucas Oil Stadium (and formerly at the RCA Dome until 2008) in Indianapolis, where college football players perform physical and mental tests in front of National Football League coaches, general managers, and scouts. With increasing interest in the NFL Draft, the scouting combine has grown in scope and significance, allowing personnel directors to evaluate upcoming prospects in a standardized setting. Its origins have evolved from the National, BLESTO, and Quadra Scouting organizations in 1977 to the media event it has become today.

Athletes attend by invitation only. Implications of an athlete's performance during the combine can affect their draft status and salary, and ultimately their career. The draft has popularized the term "workout warrior", whereby an athlete's "draft stock" is increased based on superior measurable qualities such as size, speed, and strength, despite having an average or sub-par college career. The 2019 NFL scouting combine is scheduled for February 26 to March 4.

National Football League uniform numbers

Players in the National Football League wear uniform numbers between 1 and 99, and no two players on a team may wear the same number on the field at the same time. Rules exist which tie a player's number to a specific range of numbers for their primary position. Additionally, rules exist which limit who may handle the ball on offense, generally players who are designated as offensive lineman, who wear numbers 50-79, are not allowed to handle the ball during a play from scrimmage, though they are allowed to do so if they report to the referee as playing out of position.

Reggie Bush

Reginald Alfred Bush Jr. (born March 2, 1985) is a former American football running back. He played college football at USC, where he earned consensus All-American honors twice and won the Heisman Trophy (later forfeited) as the most outstanding player in the nation. He was drafted by the New Orleans Saints second overall in the 2006 NFL Draft. While with the Saints, Bush was named an All-Pro in 2008 and won Super Bowl XLIV in 2010 over the Indianapolis Colts. He also played for the Buffalo Bills, Miami Dolphins, Detroit Lions, and San Francisco 49ers.

Bush also won the 2005 Doak Walker and Walter Camp awards. However, allegations that

he received improper benefits were central to an NCAA investigation of the USC football program that led to severe NCAA sanctions against USC, including a two-year postseason ban and the vacating of the 2004 national championship. As a result, Bush voluntarily forfeited his Heisman Trophy.

Rich McKay

Rich McKay (born March 16, 1959) is the president, CEO, and former general manager of the Atlanta Falcons of the National Football League. He was the general manager of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers when they won Super Bowl XXXVII.

Scott Pioli

Scott Pioli (born March 31, 1965) is an American football executive who is currently the assistant general manager for the Atlanta Falcons of the National Football League (NFL). He was an NFL analyst for NBC Sports' Football Night in America, NBC Sports Network's Pro Football Talk, Sirius XM NFL Radio and the NFL Network. He previously served as a front office executive for the Cleveland Browns, Baltimore Ravens, New York Jets, New England Patriots and Kansas City Chiefs. Pioli served as the Director - and later Vice President - of Player Personnel for the Patriots from 2001 to 2008 when the franchise won three Super Bowl championships. On January 22, 2014, the Falcons hired Pioli as their assistant general manager.

Tampa Bay Buccaneers

The Tampa Bay Buccaneers are a professional American football franchise based in Tampa, Florida. The Buccaneers currently compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member team of the National Football Conference (NFC) South division. Along with the Seattle Seahawks, the team joined the NFL in 1976 as an expansion team. The Bucs played their first season in the American Football Conference (AFC) West division as part of the 1976 expansion plan, whereby each new franchise would play every other franchise over the first two years. After the season, the club switched conferences with the Seahawks and became a member of the NFC Central division. During the 2002 league realignment, the Bucs joined three former NFC West teams to form the NFC South. The club is owned by the Glazer family, and plays its home games at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa.

The Buccaneers are the first post-merger expansion team to win a division title, win a playoff game, and to host and play in a conference championship game; all three accomplishments occurred during the 1979 season. They are also the first team since the merger to complete a winning season when starting 10 or more rookies, which happened in the 2010 season. In 1976 and 1977, the Buccaneers lost their first 26 games. They would not win their first game in franchise history until Week 13, of 14, in 1977. After a brief winning era in the late 1970s and early 1980s, the team suffered through 14 consecutive losing seasons. Then, for a 10-year period, they were consistent playoff contenders and won Super Bowl XXXVII at the end of the 2002 season, but have not yet returned to the Super Bowl; thus the Bucs, along with the New Orleans Saints and New York Jets, are the only NFL teams to win their lone Super Bowl appearance.

As of the end of 2018 NFL season, the Buccaneers have played 43 seasons and compiled an overall record of 266–424–1, with a regular-season record of 255–404–1 and a playoff record of 6–9.

Tuck rule (American football)

The tuck rule was a controversial rule in American football used by the National Football League from 1999 until 2013. It stated:

NFL Rule 3, Section 22, Article 2, Note 2. When [an offensive] player is holding the ball to pass it forward, any intentional forward movement of his arm starts a forward pass, even if the player loses possession of the ball as he is attempting to tuck it back toward his body. Also, if the player has tucked the ball into his body and then loses possession, it is a fumble.

If the quarterback drops or loses the football while he is bringing the ball forward in a passing motion, and the ball touches the ground, it is considered an incomplete pass. If the quarterback drops or loses the football at any other time, it is considered a fumble, as if any other player had dropped it.

It is referred to as the tuck rule because the ball leaving the quarterback's hands is considered a forward pass even if the quarterback intends not to pass the ball, but instead continues the forward motion to tuck the ball back into his body. Only once the forward motion of the arm is completed, and the ball tucked into the quarterback's body, would a subsequent loss of possession be considered a fumble.

Mike Pereira, the former director of officiating of the NFL, noted that the design of the rule avoids the question of the quarterback's intent, except that the referee still must judge whether the initial forward movement of the arm was "intentional".

Warren Sapp

Warren Carlos Sapp (born December 19, 1972) is a former American football defensive tackle. A Hall of Famer, Sapp played college football for the University of Miami, where he was recognized as a consensus All-American and won multiple awards. Sapp played in the National Football League (NFL) from 1995 to 2007 for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and Oakland Raiders, making the Pro Bowl seven times. Following Sapp's NFL career, he was an analyst on NFL Network until 2015.

Sapp was drafted by the Buccaneers in the 1995 NFL Draft as the 12th overall pick. In his nine seasons with the Buccaneers, he earned seven trips to the Pro Bowl and a Super Bowl ring in 2002. He moved to the Raiders in 2004. His 96.5 career sacks (100 with playoffs included) are the second-highest career sacks for a defensive tackle and the 28th-highest overall for a defensive lineman. His 77 sacks with the Buccaneers are the second-most in the team's history to Lee Roy Selmon's 78.5.

His career was checkered by controversy from his hard-hitting style of play and occasional verbal outbursts, both on the field and off, some of which resulted in fines by the league, and he was once ejected from a game for unsportsmanlike conduct.

In his first year of eligibility, on February 2, 2013, he was voted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. The Buccaneers entered him into their Ring of Honor on November 11, 2013, and retired his number 99 jersey. Sapp became the second Buccaneer to have his jersey retired, after Selmon.

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