NFL Sunday Ticket

NFL Sunday Ticket is an out-of-market sports package that broadcasts National Football League (NFL) regular season games unavailable on local affiliates. It carries all regional Sunday afternoon games produced by Fox and CBS. The ideal customer of this package is presumed (based on advertisements) to be a fan of a team who is unable to see their team on local television because they do not reside in one of that team's markets, or sports bars who want to increase business by attracting fans of out of town teams. The package is distributed in the United States exclusively by AT&T Inc. under its DirecTV unit (which also offers it on the Internet, on certain tablets and smartphones, and JetBlue flights); in Canada on streaming service DAZN, in Mexico and Latin America on SKY México, in South America and the Caribbean on Vrio, and several cable providers in The Bahamas and Bermuda.

United States

Satellite TV provider DirecTV has exclusive rights to the NFL Sunday Ticket package in the United States until the end of the 2022 NFL season. Although other satellite and cable providers supposedly are allowed to bid on the rights to carry NFL Sunday Ticket if they agree to carry the NFL Network, DirecTV decided to extend their current contract beyond 2014 by paying the NFL $1.5 billion per year for the next eight years. Reaching the deal was also a condition of AT&T's 2015 acquisition of DirecTV.[1][2] As of the 2015 season, the service is now available through an online-only subscription exclusively for those who are unable to use DirecTV services.[3]

NFL Sunday Ticket viewers do not count towards local Nielsen ratings; thus offering NFL Sunday Ticket on cable might cost CBS and Fox affiliates millions of dollars in lost revenue from local commercial breaks (as opposed to national ads sold by the networks). In turn, affiliates help subsidize the networks' programming costs. Since the launch of new satellites, DirecTV no longer drops other HD feeds to broadcast the NFL Sunday Ticket games in HD. DirecTV offers a free preview of NFL Sunday Ticket for the first week of the season.

Blackouts

Games scheduled to air on the local Fox and CBS affiliates within a viewer's designated media market (determined by the ZIP Code of the viewer's address) are blacked out on the NFL Sunday Ticket feed sent to their receiver. Viewers must watch these games on their local broadcast stations instead.[4] (This applies to live streaming of said games as well.)

Until the end of the 2014 season, if a game the viewer wished to watch was blacked out in their home market because it was not sold out, the game remained blacked out on NFL Sunday Ticket. Games joined or switched away from in progress usually had their blackout status altered immediately. The NFL suspended the local blackout policy for the 2015 NFL regular season, and has since done so indefinitely.[5]

Extra features

DirecTV offers the following extra features. From 2005–09 these features were part of an add-on package called Superfan and cost $100 extra. As of 2012, some of them are part of the NFL Sunday Ticket Max package which costs an extra $100.[6]

Since 2009, all games have been in high definition. The HD games were formerly part of the Superfan package.

Game Mix

This channel shows eight games at once, along with the game's score, time left in the game, and the quarter that the game is in under the game's feed. Starting in 2008, it added a high-definition feed, and in 2011, it added larger cells when four or fewer games are being played.

Red Zone Channel

This channel acts as a viewer's "remote control" and switches around various NFL games as plays of interest occur (scoring plays, key turnovers, etc.) The coverage is hosted by NFL Network's Andrew Siciliano and has been offered on some airlines, such as JetBlue. As of 2012, it is only available on the new NFL Sunday Ticket Max package.[6]

As of the 2007 season, this channel is provided in HD.

Note: This is not to be confused with the Scott Hanson-hosted NFL RedZone, which is produced separately by NFL Network. That channel airs at the same time on Dish Network, various cable systems, and also on Verizon Wireless smartphones.

Short Cuts

This two-channel duo recaps every NFL game in 30 minutes or less, including games not available on NFL Sunday Ticket because they were televised locally or blacked out. One channel shows AFC games while the other shows NFC games. These highlights are made available on Sunday nights and are shown continuously until Tuesday morning. As of 2012, it is only available on the new NFL Sunday Ticket Max package.[6]

Highlights on Demand

DirecTV subscribers with interactive DVRs receive a three- to four-minute recap of every NFL Sunday Ticket game on demand with this feature, via channel 1005. As of 2012, it is only available on the new NFL Sunday Ticket Max package.[6]

NFL.com Fantasy Football TV app

Starting in 2011, the NFL.com Fantasy Football TV app will allow NFL.com fantasy players with Internet-connected set-top boxes to view their NFL.com Fantasy Football teams and scores directly on their TV screen.

Computers, tablets and smartphones

NFL Sunday Ticket Max subscribers can also stream games on the Internet and their smartphones and tablets.[6] Starting in 2009, NFL Sunday Ticket To Go is also available to non-DirecTV subscribers who are unable to receive satellite television in their homes or apartments due to line of sight issues. The cost is $50 more than those with DirecTV service. DirecTV offers NFL Sunday Ticket To Go on Motorola Xoom and Samsung Galaxy tablets; Motorola Android phones; the iPad, iPhone, iPod Touch, BlackBerry OS devices with 3G or wifi, Palm Pre/Pixi, and other Droid-branded phones.

Gaming consoles

For those who do not have DirecTV, the NFL offers the Sunday Ticket package for the PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, Xbox 360 and Xbox One video game consoles.[7][8]

JetBlue

Starting on October 3, 2010, DirecTV began offering the full slate of NFL Sunday Ticket games on JetBlue flights to 50 destinations across the United States.

History

The concept of NFL Sunday Ticket was largely invented by Jon Taffer during his three-year term on the board of NFL Enterprises, along with NFL Chief of Marketing Michael Miller.[9] NFL Sunday Ticket was launched in 1994 and was available on both DirecTV (which had launched just months earlier) and on C band and Ku band satellites, for which the receiving dishes are larger in size. Within several years, the service became available on various cable systems in Canada as well.

International distribution

NFL Sunday Ticket is also available in Mexico, Latin America, Bermuda, The Bahamas and Canada (for business customers only).

Canada

NFL Sunday Ticket was previously available in Canada through most major pay television providers, often in a bundle with other sports packages. In July 2017, it was announced that the streaming service DAZN had acquired the rights to the NFL's out-of-market package beginning in the 2017 NFL season. The games previously available through this service, as well as NFL Game Pass, are bundled with the provider's service in Canada.[10][11][12]

However, after DAZN's Canadian launch was met with frequent technical problems and user criticism, DAZN announced that it had begun to offer NFL Sunday Ticket to television providers as an alternative to its over-the-top product.[13]

México and Central America

South America and Caribbean

Brazil

Bermuda

Bahamas

  • Cable Bahamas

See also

References

  1. ^ Smith, Michael (October 1, 2014). "NFL announces extension of DirecTV Sunday Ticket deal". NBC Sports. Retrieved October 3, 2014.
  2. ^ "DirecTV secures NFL Sunday Ticket deal vital to AT&T merger". CNET. CBS Interactive. Retrieved 12 August 2015.
  3. ^ "DirecTV To Stream 'NFL Sunday Ticket' To Those Who Can't Buy Satellite". Deadline.com. Retrieved 12 August 2015.
  4. ^ DirecTV Information on blackouts on NFL Sunday Ticket
  5. ^ "NFL suspends blackout policy for 2015" National Football League.
  6. ^ a b c d e DirecTV NFL Sunday Ticket official page
  7. ^ "Stream NFL SUNDAY TICKET live online". DirecTV.com. Retrieved September 6, 2014.
  8. ^ Rubens, Alex. "NFL Sunday Ticket Coming to Xbox One and PS4, But There's a Catch..." IGN.com. Ziff Davis, LLC. Retrieved 17 March 2015.
  9. ^ "SEC Archives". Retrieved 2013-10-02.
  10. ^ "Self-professed 'Netflix of sports' app DAZN launches in Canada with all NFL games". CBC News. Retrieved 2017-07-21.
  11. ^ "DAZN, the Netflix of sports, launches in Canada with exclusive NFL streaming rights". Financial Post. 2017-07-20. Retrieved 2017-07-21.
  12. ^ "Streaming service DAZN buys Canadian NFL rights". Toronto Sun. Retrieved 2017-07-24.
  13. ^ "DAZN working on making all NFL games available via cable, satellite providers". National Post. 2017-10-07. Retrieved 2017-10-10.

External links

NFL Sunday Ticket

1994 NFL season

The 1994 NFL season was the 75th regular season of the National Football League. To honor the NFL's 75th season, a special anniversary logo was designed and each player wore a patch on their jerseys with this logo throughout the season. Also, a selection committee of media and league personnel named a special NFL 75th Anniversary All-Time Team, honoring the best NFL players from the first 75 seasons.

The Phoenix Cardinals changed their name to “Arizona Cardinals” in an attempt to widen their appeal to the entire state of Arizona instead of just the Phoenix area. The name was initially resisted by Bill Bidwill.

The Seattle Seahawks played their first three regular season home games at Husky Stadium because the Kingdome, the Seahawks' regular home field, was undergoing repairs for damaged tiles on its roof. The Seahawks returned for the 2000 and 2001 seasons while their new stadium was under construction.

This marked the last season until 2016 that the city of Los Angeles had an NFL team and the last one until 2017 that the city had two. Both the Rams and the Raiders left the city following the season. The Rams moved east to St. Louis, Missouri after being in Los Angeles for 49 years, while the Raiders left after twelve seasons to return to their previous home in Oakland, California. The Rams eventually returned in 2016 after failing to reach an agreement with St. Louis on a new stadium.

This was also the first season that the then eight-year old Fox network televised NFL games. Fox took over the National Football Conference package from CBS, who would return to televising the NFL in 1998. The league also signed an exclusivity agreement with the new direct broadcast satellite (DBS) service DirecTV to launch NFL Sunday Ticket, a satellite television subscription service that offers every regular season NFL game. The package remains exclusive to DirecTV to this day.

The season ended with Super Bowl XXIX when the San Francisco 49ers defeated the San Diego Chargers 49–26 at Joe Robbie Stadium. Both teams had met that regular season, the second straight season that had happened, and ninth time overall.

Even though the 1994 World Series was canceled, the NFL ultimately decided not to reschedule its Thursday night contests in October for Sunday, even though they wouldn't have competed with baseball those nights.

This was also the first year of the current practice of whenever Christmas Day falls on a Sunday that most of that weekend's games were played on the Saturday afternoon of Christmas Eve. Every NFL season afterwards with Christmas Day on a Sunday has followed this same scheduling format. (Prior to the 1990 introduction of the bye week, Christmas had fallen within the postseason. In years in which Christmas was on a Sunday, that weekend's games would be split between Saturday December 24 and Monday December 26.)

1994 would also be the first season in which the NFL instituted a salary cap.

Andrew Siciliano

Andrew David Siciliano (born 1974, in Virginia, U.S.) is an American sports television anchor, reporter and radio broadcaster. He is currently the sole host of NFL Sunday Ticket Red Zone, airing on DirecTV's Red Zone Channel (#703 on DirecTV). He has held this position since 2005. Andrew also serves as a host for NFL Total Access on the NFL Network. He has also hosted coverage of the Olympic Games in 2014 and 2016 for NBC Sports's coverage, mainly for the online-only events network "Gold Zone", which features a format which is equivalent to that of Red Zone. He is also the play-by-play voice announcer for the Los Angeles Rams.

DAZN

DAZN (pronounced "Da Zone"; də-ZOHN) is a subscription video streaming service owned by Perform Group. The service is dedicated to sports, offering live and on-demand streaming of events from various properties. It first launched in Austria, Germany, Japan, and Switzerland in August 2016, and in Canada the following year. It was launched in the United States and Italy in 2018, and will launch in Spain and Brazil in 2019.

DirecTV

DirecTV is an American direct broadcast satellite service provider based in El Segundo, California and is a subsidiary of AT&T. Its satellite service, launched on June 17, 1994, transmits digital satellite television and audio to households in the United States, Latin America, Americas and the Caribbean. Its primary competitors are Dish Network and cable television providers. On July 24, 2015, after receiving approval from the United States Federal Communications Commission and United States Department of Justice, AT&T acquired DirecTV in a transaction valued at $67.1 billion.As of Q1 2017, DirecTV U.S. had 21 million subscribers (26 million if combined with U-verse) and revenues of $12 billion.

On November 30, 2016, DirecTV Now, their internet streaming TV service, was launched.

ESPN College Extra

ESPN College Extra is an American out-of-market sports package. It was launched on August 28, 2015 as a merger of the existing ESPN Full Court and ESPN GamePlan, each of which offered college basketball and college football broadcasts respectively.

ESPN College Extra broadcasts College Football from the ACC, NCAA FCS and NCAA Division II.

ESPN Full Court

ESPN Full Court was an out-of-market sports package in the United States that carried college basketball games. The package consisted of about 150 games annually, from the season tipoff in November to the first two rounds of the NCAA Women's Division I Basketball Championship in mid- to late-March. The suggested retail price was $109 for the entire season, $75 for a half-season (only available in late January), and $19.95 for a single day. The season package was renewable. Full-season packages were not available for the online version.

On August 28, 2015, the channel was replaced by ESPN College Extra and the package was much less promoted or available than it has been in the past with the drawing down of pay-per-view to select special events; all of Full Court's events are available through WatchESPN via various ESPN3 streams without cost through TV Everywhere authentication.

ESPN GamePlan

ESPN GamePlan was an out-of-market sports package offering college football games to viewers throughout the United States.

GamePlan began on Labor Day weekend, and continued through the first Saturday in December. It included all regional telecasts on ABC, as well as games from various syndicators like ESPN Plus, Raycom Sports and SportsWest, and some local stations like Allentown, Pennsylvania's WFMZ-TV which broadcast locally-produced college football games. Viewers could watch games from their cable or satellite provider or on the ESPN3 broadband Internet service.

Eventually, with carriage of ESPN3 moving from computers only to smartphones, tablets and digital media players allowing access without any additional fees, GamePlan became a superfluous package, with only the few providers who refused to offer ESPN3 or where ESPN3 access was limited (for instance, rural areas) really able to compel viewers to use the service.

On August 28, 2015, the package was discontinued, along with ESPN Full Court, to make way for ESPN College Extra, which will offer a select bundle of games that would previously have been broadcast by GamePlan and Full Court.

History of the National Football League on television

The history of the National Football League on television documents the long history of the National Football League on television. The NFL, along with boxing and professional wrestling (before the latter publicly became known as a "fake" sport), was a pioneer of sports broadcasting during a time when baseball and college football were more popular than professional football. Due to the NFL understanding television at an earlier time, they were able to surpass Major League Baseball in the 1960s as the most popular sport in the United States. Today, NFL broadcasting contracts are among the most valuable in the world.

MLB Extra Innings

MLB Extra Innings is an Out-of-Market Sports Package distributed in North America by satellite provider DirecTV since 2010 and by most cable providers since 2001. The package allows its subscribers to see up to 80 out-of-market Major League Baseball games a week using local over the air stations and regional sports networks.

As of the 2008 season, the feeds from both teams' broadcasts are available for each game on DirecTV, even if a team is showing the game locally on a broadcast station. Even though the package relies on satellite uplink paths, DirecTV also carries feeds from local broadcast and even cable-only networks as well, such as NBC Sports Philadelphia for the Philadelphia Phillies. Feeds that are not included on the DirecTV version of Extra Innings include KCAL (Dodgers), KCOP-TV (Angels), KNTV (Giants), and WCIU (Cubs and White Sox) unless that is your local area.The iN DEMAND version of Extra Innings added the "dual feed" system for select broadcasts after the 2008 MLB All-Star Game. Along with this, the iN DEMAND version of MLB Extra Innings has been able to add broadcast television stations, WKYC (Indians), WJZ-TV (Orioles), WUSA (Nationals), WPIX (Mets, Yankees), WPHL-TV (Phillies), and in addition, one Canadian RSN, the Toronto Blue Jays' Rogers Sports Net feed. Previously, only one feed was available, usually the home team's. For the 2017 season, Comcast X1 customers could get all MLB EI games in HDTV, using the Beta IN DEMAND platform. DirecTV has offered all MLB EI (Most with dual HD feeds) games in HDTV for years.

Free previews of MLB Extra Innings are shown during the first week of the season, and the week after the All Star Game.

MLS Direct Kick

MLS Direct Kick is an Out-of-Market Sports Package distributed by most cable and satellite providers in North America. As of the 2011 season, package subscribers will be able to watch up to 221 Major League Soccer regular season games as well as some MLS Cup playoff matches. The target market for this package (based on advertisements) is soccer fans who are unable to see games because they have moved out of that team's market.

NFL RedZone

NFL RedZone is an American sports television channel owned and operated by NFL Network since 2009. As a "special" game-day exclusive, it broadcasts on Sundays during the NFL regular season from 1:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern (10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Pacific). RedZone provides "whip around" simulcast coverage of all Sunday afternoon games airing in-progress on CBS and Fox.

RedZone is based out of the NFL Network studios and is hosted by Scott Hanson, and airs commercial-free. The channel prides itself on showing "every touchdown from every game," and is closely linked to Fantasy Football, reporting superlatives and tracking various statistical accomplishments throughout the afternoon. RedZone monitors coverage of the traditional Sunday afternoon 1:00 p.m. "early" games and 4:05/4:25 p.m. "late" games.

RedZone is offered by numerous cable providers, Dish Network, and Verizon Wireless smartphones, but specifically is not available on DirecTV, which offers its own version (Red Zone Channel hosted by Andrew Siciliano) as part of NFL Sunday Ticket.

ESPN Goal Line, a channel which debuted one year later, broadcasts college football with a similar format and style. The name "RedZone" derives from the term red zone, which is the part of the football field between the 20-yard line and the goal line.

NHL Centre Ice

For the American service, see NHL Center Ice.

NHL Centre Ice is a Canadian digital cable subscription out-of-market sports package controlled and distributed by Rogers Communications through Rogers Cable as of 2014. It is offered by three national satellite television service providers, Bell TV, TELUS Optik TV, Telus Satellite TV, and Shaw Direct and many digital cable television providers such as Eastlink, Shaw, Cogeco and more.

It offers NHL regular season and select playoff games that are played outside the local viewing area using American local and national television networks such as Fox Sports Net and other sports networks like NBC. It offers both standard and high definition games.

National Football League on Canadian television

As of the 2017 NFL season, CTV and TSN broadcast Sunday games. Monday Night Football airs exclusively on TSN. TSN and CTV Two own rights to Sunday Night Football and Thursday Night Football. RDS carries games in the French language from all timeslots. U.S. network television feeds may also be available, often from multiple markets, on cable and satellite (and via terrestrial broadcast in the border lands); all games are subject to simultaneous substitution.

National Football League on television

The television rights to broadcast National Football League (NFL) games are the most lucrative and expensive rights of any American sport. Television brought professional football into prominence in the modern era after World War II. Since then, National Football League broadcasts have become among the most-watched programs on American television, and the financial fortunes of entire networks have rested on owning NFL broadcasting rights. This has raised questions about the impartiality of the networks' coverage of games and whether they can criticize the NFL without fear of losing the rights and their income.

Since the 1960s, all regular season and playoff games broadcast in the United States have been aired by national television networks. Until the broadcast contract ended in 2013, the terrestrial television networks CBS, NBC, and Fox, as well as cable television's ESPN, paid a combined total of US$20.4 billion to broadcast NFL games. From 2014 to 2022, the same networks will pay $39.6 billion for exactly the same broadcast rights. The NFL thus holds broadcast contracts with four companies (CBS Corporation, Comcast, Fox Corporation and The Walt Disney Company/Hearst Corporation, respectively) that control a combined vast majority of the country's television product. League-owned NFL Network, on cable television, also broadcasts a selected number of games nationally. In 2017, the NFL games attracted the top three rates for a 30-second advertisement: $699,602 for NBC Sunday Night Football, $550,709 for Thursday Night Football (NBC), and $549,791 for Thursday Night Football (CBS).Under the current contracts, regionally shown games on Sunday afternoons are televised on CBS and Fox, which primarily carry games of AFC and NFC teams respectively (the conference of the road team determines the broadcaster of an inter-conference game). Nationally televised regular season games on Sunday and Monday nights are aired on NBC and ESPN, respectively, while NBC, FOX and NFL Network share Thursday night games during the regular season. During the postseason, ESPN airs one game, NBC airs two, while CBS and Fox air the rest of the AFC and NFC games, respectively. The Super Bowl has rotated annually among CBS, Fox, and NBC since the 2006 season.

NFL preseason telecasts are more in line with the other major sports leagues' regular-season telecasts: preseason telecasts are more locally produced, usually by a local affiliate of one of the above terrestrial television networks. Some preseason games will air nationally, however. Under the NFL's anti-siphoning rules for cable games, these stations usually will air simulcasts of ESPN and/or NFL Network games in their local markets if the local team is playing.

Out-of-market sports package

In North America, an out-of-market sports package is a form of subscription television that broadcasts sporting events to areas where the events are unable to be seen by viewers on other broadcast and cable television networks due to the games not being broadcast in their local market.

Many leagues with major television contracts establish elaborate rules regarding which games are broadcast in different regions (with local teams usually getting preference). For viewers who prefer to see a game other than the one being locally broadcast in their designated market area, the out-of market package provides additional options.

Reverse mirror

In television (typically sports broadcasting), a reverse mirror refers to a situation in which two national television channels have their signals split regionally, such that each of two programs will be available in all (or almost all) regions on one of the two channels, but will not air on the same channel in both regions.

As an example, consider the following situation:

Two games, Game 1 and Game 2, are being played simultaneously. The broadcast rights to both games are owned by the same company, which also controls both Channel A and Channel B, and there are no restrictions on airing both games in the same location.

Channel A reaches more viewers than Channel B (for example, Channel A may be a broadcast network whereas Channel B might be a cable channel). Alternatively, other considerations, such as Canadian simultaneous substitution regulations, may make it more advantageous for Channel A to carry a particular game in a particular region.

In Region X, Game 1 is determined to be of greater interest to viewers (or more advantageous to air on Channel A), while in Region Y, the same applies to Game 2.Then in Region X, Game 1 will air on Channel A, and Game 2 will air on Channel B. In Region Y, these will be reversed: Game 2 will air on Channel A, and Game 1 will air on Channel B. This is usually accomplished by sending different feeds to the individual stations or cable companies transmitting the signals of each channel.

Note that simply "splitting the network" between multiple regional games (e.g. Sunday afternoon NFL games in the U.S.) is not a reverse mirror, since there is no alternate channel on which a secondary game from the same network can air (apart from premium pay-per-view packages such as NFL Sunday Ticket).

Steve Bornstein

Steve Bornstein (born April 20, 1952) is the chairman of the Media Networks division of gaming company Activision Blizzard. He previously held high-ranking roles at NFL Network, ESPN, and ABC. While at ESPN, he organized putting SportsCenter reruns on during the morning hours.

Vu!

Vu!, also operating as Bell TV On Demand, is a Canadian English and French language pay-per-view and Video on Demand provider that launched in October 1999 and is owned by Bell TV. Vu! is the largest PPV service provider in Canada and is available on Telus Satellite TV, Bell TV, Bell Fibe TV, and Bell Aliant FibreOP. It not only offers pay-per-view content but also features pay-per-day, pay-per-month and pay-per-year on select programming.

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