NFL Replay

NFL Replay is a program that airs on the official television channel of the National Football League, NFL Network.

This is not to be confused with NFL Films Game of the Week, which aired on NFL Network each Friday night in 2006. That one-hour program, which only used footage from NFL Films, has been canceled by the network, but aired on ION Television in 2007.

Four of the week's games, as selected by network representatives, are rebroadcast in an edited format with the following schedule:

  • Game 1: Tuesday, 8 p.m. and 1 a.m. (early Wednesday)
  • Game 2: Tuesday, 9:30 p.m.
  • Game 3: Wednesday, 8 p.m. and 1 a.m. (early Thursday)
  • Game 4: Wednesday, 9:30 p.m.

All times are Eastern.

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Format

Games are compressed into fast-paced 1½-hour programs. In addition to the original Fox, CBS, NBC, ESPN, or NFL Network broadcast, NFL Replay shows camera angles of certain plays as captured by NFL Films, as well as sound from players and coaches before, during, and after each game.

Program history

  • The first episode was a rebroadcast of the Pittsburgh Steelers' win over the Miami Dolphins. The game took place on September 7, 2006 and was re-aired on September 9.
  • When the show debuted, GMC sponsored the NFL Films camera angle replays.
  • On October 19, 2006, NFL Replay presented a fifth game for the first time. It was the Chicago Bears defeating the Arizona Cardinals, 24-23. The Bears were the first team in NFL history to win a game after trailing by 20 points at any point despite not scoring an offensive touchdown in the entire game. This was also the first re-broadcast of a Monday night game in this manner.
  • The show was advertised with a light-hearted campaign which features a number of NFL players singing, dancing, with cheerleaders. The players were Chad Johnson, Tony Gonzalez, Willis McGahee, Clinton Portis, Warren Sapp, Ray Lewis, Keyshawn Johnson and Jeremy Shockey.
  • Originally, NFL Replay consisted of four episodes per week. As of Oct. 19, a fifth weekly episode was added, bumping NFL Cheerleader Playoffs to Saturday afternoons. This fifth showing continued until Run to the Playoffs, the first live NFL game action, debuted on November 23.
  • Around New Year's Day 2007, NFL Replay added analysis by Brian Baldinger and Solomon Wilcots using the "Playbook" feature.
  • For the 2007 season, a fifth game was added to the regular schedule. Previously, a fifth game aired occasionally; if it were added, it was shown on Thursday nights. Also, the show no longer used an on-camera host, which had usually been Fran Charles, and the Playbook segments were removed as that show was restored to the network's lineup. Some elements are now handled by an off-camera narrator.
  • In 2008, NFL Network removed the Monday game from the schedule and returned to only four games per week. However, a spin-off show, NFL Replay Real-Time, was added to the schedule. The program shows Sunday afternoon highlights in the exact order that they occurred during the day. NFL Replay Real-Time premieres every Monday at 7:30 p.m. Eastern time and airs in the hour before Monday Night Football starts on ESPN.
  • Since the 2010 season, actor Mike Rock has been the off-camera narrator.

External links

2009 Detroit Lions season

The 2009 Detroit Lions season was the franchise’s eightieth season overall in the National Football League. It was the first season with the Lions for new head coach Jim Schwartz, and most of his new coaching staff. The Lions also introduced slightly new uniforms and logos. The Lions spent the whole season at the bottom of their division and finished at 2–14, the second-worst record during the 2009 season. Pro Football Reference has argued that, owing to a weaker programme featuring the NFC West and AFC North vis-à-vis their 2008 schedule against surprisingly strong NFC South and AFC South divisions, the 2009 Lions were actually a weaker team than the 0–16 2008 Lions.

2017 Buffalo Bills season

The 2017 Buffalo Bills season was the franchise's 48th season in the National Football League, and the 58th overall, and third full season under the ownership of Terry and Kim Pegula. The season was the first under the leadership of general manager Brandon Beane and head coach Sean McDermott.

On December 31, the final week of the regular season, the Bills finally ended what would have been their 18-year playoff drought (previously the longest active drought in the NFL and the longest active playoff drought among the four major professional North American sport leagues) with the Bills winning 22–16 over the Dolphins and the Cincinnati Bengals upsetting the Baltimore Ravens 31–27. The Bills also improved on their 7–9 record from 2016 and clinched their first winning season since 2014. However, the Bills lost the wild card game against Jacksonville 3–10, extending their playoff victory drought to 22 years. The Bills are the last team since the NFL re-alignment in 2002 to make the playoffs.

AFC Championship Game

The AFC Championship Game is the annual championship game of the American Football Conference (AFC) and one of the two semi-final playoff games of the National Football League (NFL), the largest professional American football league in the United States. The game is played on the penultimate Sunday in January by the two remaining playoff teams, following the AFC postseason's first two rounds. The AFC champion then advances to face the winner of the National Football Conference (NFC) Championship Game in the Super Bowl.

The game was established as part of the 1970 merger between the NFL and the American Football League (AFL), with the merged league realigning into two conferences. Since 1984, each winner of the AFC Championship Game has also received the Lamar Hunt Trophy, named after the founder of both the AFL and the Kansas City Chiefs, Lamar Hunt.

Colts–Patriots rivalry

The Colts–Patriots rivalry is a National Football League (NFL) rivalry between the Indianapolis Colts and the New England Patriots. It is considered one of the most famous rivalries in the NFL. The two teams have combined for seven Super Bowl victories (six by the Patriots) and ten AFC Championships (eight by the Patriots) since 2001, while both are noted for their organizational excellence.The nature of this rivalry is somewhat ironic because while the Colts and Patriots were AFC East division rivals from 1970–2001 (dating prior to the Colts' move from Baltimore to Indianapolis), their intensified enmity wasn't prevalent until Indianapolis was moved into the newly formed AFC South following the 2001 season as part of the NFL's realignment. Following New England's 43–22 win in the 2013–14 playoffs the Patriots lead the series with nine wins (three in the playoffs) versus five wins (one playoff) for the Colts, and the Patriots hold a lead in points scored, 411–351.

The modern matchup spanning the period of 2001–2011 was usually headlined as a contest between quarterbacks Peyton Manning and Tom Brady, who together won six NFL MVP awards in eight years (2003–10; four by Manning). In September 2001 Brady received his first start against the Colts after an injury to then-starter Drew Bledsoe, and proceeded to defeat the Colts in his first six games against them in the next years, including the 2003 AFC Championship Game and a 2004 AFC Divisional playoff game. The 2004 Divisional game was notable as the Patriots held a record breaking Colts offense to 3 points on snowy cold night in Foxborough. The Colts won the next three matches, notching two regular season victories and a win in the 2006 AFC Championship Game on the way to their win in Super Bowl XLI. Since then, the Patriots have won the six out of the next eight games from 2007–14. The quarterback angle of the rivalry changed in 2012 following Manning's release from the team, and with the surge to success of Colts rookie Andrew Luck. The rivalry gained momentum again in February 2018, when Patriots offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels, who had agreed to become the head coach of the Colts, went back on his word and decided to stay on as a coordinator in New England.

Dick Hantak

Dick Hantak (born c. 1938) was an American football official in the National Football League (NFL) for 25 years between 1978 and 2003. He began his NFL officiating career as a back judge and became a referee eight years later. During his career, he officiated in two Super Bowls, Super Bowl XVII in 1983 as a back judge and later as a referee in Super Bowl XXVII in 1993, both at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, California and selected as an alternate for Super Bowl XXXII in 1998. He was one of the first officials to wear a three-digit uniform number, wearing number 105 except for 1979-81, when officials were numbered separately by position.

Hantak was most notable for being involved in a game that would result in the elimination of the excessive crowd noise rule from the NFL because of the actions during an exhibition game preceding the 1989 NFL season between the Cincinnati Bengals and New Orleans Saints at the Louisiana Superdome. Prior to the snap to begin a play, Bengals quarterback Boomer Esiason constantly complained to Hantak about the loud crowd noise inside of the dome and would embellish his reactions in protest over the newly created rule. Esiason would later admit that he was put up to the task by then head coach Sam Wyche.Hantak was also involved in a humorous incident during a 1996 game between Pittsburgh and Carolina. On a punt the ball landed in the endzone and the Carolina mascot Sir Purr downed it, unaware the ball was live. While Steelers coach Bill Cowher was laughing, Hantak told Sir Purr not to do it again.

Dick ended his distinguished officiating career with a playoff game on January 11, 2003 between the Oakland Raiders and New York Jets.

As of the 2006 NFL season, Hantak serves as an NFL replay official, working on-site in the video officiating booth.

Hantak is a 1960 graduate of Southeast Missouri State University and was a member of Sigma Tau Gamma.

List of American television programs currently in production

This is a list of American television programs currently in production.

List of programs broadcast by NFL Network

The following is a list of programs broadcast by the NFL Network.

Melvin Bullitt

Melvin Terry Bullitt (born November 13, 1984) is a former American football defensive back. He was signed by the Indianapolis Colts as an undrafted free agent in 2007 and played for the team for five seasons. He played college football at Texas A&M.

NFC Championship Game

The NFC Championship Game is the annual championship game of the National Football Conference (NFC) and one of the two semi-final playoff games of the National Football League (NFL), the largest professional American football league in the United States. The game is played on the penultimate Sunday in January by the two remaining playoff teams, following the NFC postseason's first two rounds. The NFC champion then advances to face the winner of the American Football Conference (AFC) Championship Game in the Super Bowl.

The game was established as part of the 1970 merger between the NFL and the American Football League (AFL), with the merged league realigning into two conferences. Since 1984, each winner of the NFC Championship Game has also received the George Halas Trophy, named after the founder and longtime owner of the NFL's Chicago Bears, George Halas.

NFL Cheerleader Playoffs

NFL Cheerleader Playoffs is a television show that debuted in 2006 on the NFL Network. The official channel of the National Football League premiered each episode on Saturdays at 3 p.m. Eastern Time (ET).

The competition was produced by IMG's television production division. Matt Gallant was the host, and Ian Eagle, Chad Johnson, and Carrie Milbank are reporters.

The playoffs were taped between July 17 and July 21, 2006 at Six Flags New England in Agawam, Massachusetts. Two-person teams of cheerleaders from 25 of the NFL's 32 teams participated in a four-event series of competitions.

The first two events test the cheerleaders' athletic abilities in events like the 100-yard dash, kayaking, tandem cycling, and the obstacle course. The third event is a trivia challenge called "Know Your NFL". The final competition is a one-minute dance routine, similar to what they normally perform on NFL sidelines.

There were six first-round episodes, five with four teams and one with five. The top two teams from each show (based on the point system below) advanced to the second round. Three winners moved to the third round, with the top two teams going head-to-head in the final. Each member of the winning team of cheerleaders received $5,000 cash and a Nautilus exercise machine, made by Bowflex.

Playbook (TV series)

Playbook is an X's and O's football show with an entertaining flair. Playbook goes into the NFL Films room to examine a head coach's game film. In its original format, it was a 30-minute program hosted every weeknight during the NFL season and playoffs. In its new format, it is a one-hour program on Thursday and Friday, each day centering on either the AFC (Thursday) or the NFC (Friday).

Replay review in gridiron football

In gridiron football, replay review is a method of reviewing a play using cameras at various angles to determine the accuracy of the initial call of the officials. An instant replay can take place in the event of a close or otherwise controversial call, either at the request of a team's head coach (with limitations) or the officials themselves.

Replay reviews are utilized in some Texas high school games, and also for many games at the college level and above. The National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) establishes the rules for most high school and youth organizations in the United States (though not for Texas high schools), and the rules of the NFHS do not permit replay reviews even when the equipment exists to enable the practice. In those leagues that utilize replay reviews, there are restrictions on what types of plays can be reviewed. In general, most penalty calls or lack thereof cannot be reviewed, nor can a play that is whistled dead by the officials before the play could come to its rightful end.

American and Canadian football leagues vary in their application and use of instant replay review.

Robert Gallagher

Robert Gallagher (born 1969 in Kensington, England) is an award winning commercial and editorial photographer currently based in Los Angeles, California. He has been awarded three times in the prestigious Communication Arts Photography Annual, named one of the 'Top 25 Photographers of 2016' by Creative Quarterly and is archived in The National Portrait Gallery in London

Super Bowl XLV

Super Bowl XLV was an American football game between the American Football Conference (AFC) champion Pittsburgh Steelers and the National Football Conference (NFC) champion Green Bay Packers to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 2010 season. The Packers defeated the Steelers by the score of 31–25. The game was played on February 6, 2011 at Cowboys Stadium in Arlington, Texas, the first time the Super Bowl was played in the Dallas–Fort Worth area.

Unlike most other Super Bowls, this game featured two title-abundant franchises: coming into the game, the Packers held the most NFL championships with 12 (9 league championships prior to the Super Bowl era and 3 Super Bowl championships), while the Steelers held the most Super Bowl championships with 6. The Packers entered their fifth Super Bowl in team history, and became the first number 6-seeded team in the NFC to compete in the Super Bowl, after posting a 10–6 regular season record. The Steelers finished the regular season with a 12–4 record, and advanced to a league-tying 8th Super Bowl appearance.

Green Bay dominated most of the first half of Super Bowl XLV, jumping to a 21–3 lead before Pittsburgh cut it down to 21–10 just before halftime. Then after the teams exchanged touchdowns, the Steelers pulled within 28–25 midway through the fourth quarter with wide receiver Mike Wallace's 25-yard touchdown reception from quarterback Ben Roethlisberger and a two-point conversion. But the Packers answered with Mason Crosby's 23-yard field goal with 2:07 remaining, and then prevented the Steelers from scoring on their final drive of the game. Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers was named Super Bowl MVP, completing 24 of 39 passes for 304 yards and three touchdowns.

The broadcast of Super Bowl XLV on Fox averaged about 111 million viewers, breaking the record for the most-watched program in American television history. The game's attendance was 103,219, just short of the Super Bowl record 103,985 set in Super Bowl XIV at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, California. The halftime show featured the American hip hop group The Black Eyed Peas, with additional performances by Usher and Slash.

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