NFC West

The National Football Conference – Western Division or NFC West is one of the four divisions of the National Football Conference (NFC) in the National Football League (NFL). It currently has four members: the Arizona Cardinals, the Los Angeles Rams, the San Francisco 49ers, and the Seattle Seahawks.

The division was formed in 1967 as the National Football League Coastal Division, keeping with the theme of having all of the league's divisions starting with the letter "C." The division was so named because its teams were fairly close to the coasts of the United States, although they were on opposite coasts, making for long travel between division rivals. The NFL Coastal Division had four members: Atlanta Falcons, Baltimore Colts, Los Angeles Rams, and San Francisco 49ers. Los Angeles and San Francisco occupied the West Coast, while Baltimore and Atlanta occupied the East Coast.

After the AFL–NFL merger in 1970, the division was renamed the NFC West. The Baltimore Colts moved to the AFC East and were replaced by the New Orleans Saints. In 1976, the newly formed Seattle Seahawks spent one season in this division before moving to the AFC West. Except for that one year, the division remained the same until 1995 with the addition of the new Carolina Panthers team. The Rams moved to St. Louis before that same season, making the division geographically inaccurate. Ten of the fifteen NFC teams were based west of Atlanta, and twelve of them were based west of Charlotte.

The 2002 re-alignment changed the entire look of the NFC West. The Falcons, Panthers, and Saints moved into the NFC South; while the Cardinals moved in from the NFC East and the Seahawks returned from the AFC West. The Rams remained in the West, preserving the historical rivalry with the 49ers that has existed since 1950, and thus had been the only team in the division that was located east of the Rocky Mountains until 2015. With the Rams' return to Los Angeles in 2016, the entire NFC West is now located west of the Rockies for the first time in its history.

In 2010, the NFC West became the first division in NFL history to have a champion with a losing record, after the 2010 Seattle Seahawks won the division title with a record of 7–9. They were joined in this distinction in 2014 by the Carolina Panthers, who won the NFC South with a record of 7–8–1.

Since the end of the 2016 NFL regular season, the 49ers lead the division with a record of 560–464–16 (107–132–1 since re-alignment) with five Super Bowl titles and an overall playoff record of 31–21. The Rams hold a record of 544–554–21 (87–152–1 since re-alignment) with three Super Bowl appearances and one win to go with a 19–24 overall playoffs record. The Cardinals hold a 111–128-1 record since joining the NFC West (542–732–40 overall) and a loss in Super Bowl XLIII, currently with a 7–9 playoff record, 5-4 as a member of the NFC West. The Seahawks hold a record of 137–102-1 since joining the NFC West (325–318-1 overall), with three Super Bowl appearances, winning Super Bowl XLVIII to go with a playoff record of 16–14; they are currently 13–9 in the playoffs as a member of the NFC West, having gone 3–5 while in the AFC West. Since re-alignment, the Seahawks have led the division in wins, division titles, and playoff appearances.

NFC West
ConferenceNational Football Conference
LeagueNational Football League
SportAmerican football
Founded1967 (as the NFL Western Conference Coastal Division)
CountryUnited States
Teams
No. of teams4
Championships
Most recent NFC West champion(s)Los Angeles Rams (17th title)
Most NFC West titlesSan Francisco 49ers (19 titles)

Division lineups

Place cursor over year for division champ or Super Bowl team.

NFL Western Conference
Coastal Division
NFC West Division[B]
1900s 2000s
67[A] 68 69 70[B] 71 72 73 74 75 76[C] 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95[D] 96 97 98 99 00 01
Atlanta Falcons
Los Angeles Rams St. Louis Rams
Baltimore Colts New Orleans Saints
San Francisco 49ers
  Seattle
Seahawks
  Carolina Panthers
NFC West Division[E]
2000s
02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
Arizona Cardinals
St. Louis Rams Los Angeles Rams [F]
San Francisco 49ers
Seattle Seahawks
     Team not in division      Division Won Super Bowl      Division Won NFC Championship      Division Won NFL Championship, Lost Super Bowl III
A The Western Conference was divided into the Coastal and Central divisions. Atlanta moved in from the Eastern Conference. Also joining the Coastal Division were Baltimore, Los Angeles, and San Francisco.
B The Coastal Division adopts current name after the AFL–NFL merger. Baltimore moved to the AFC East. New Orleans moved in from Capitol Division.
C Seattle was enfranchised in 1976. Moved to the AFC West in 1977.
D In 1995, Carolina is enfranchised and the Rams move to St. Louis, Missouri.
E For the 2002 season, the league realigned to have eight (8) four-team divisions. Seattle returns. Arizona joins from the East. Atlanta, Carolina, and New Orleans moved to the new NFC South.
F Prior to the 2016 season, the Rams moved back to Los Angeles.

Division champions

Season Team Record Playoff Results
NFL Coastal
1967 Los Angeles Rams 11–1–2 Lost Conference Playoffs (at Packers) 7–28
1968 Baltimore Colts 13–1 Won Conference Playoffs (Vikings) 24–14
Won NFL Championship Game (Browns) 34–0
Lost Super Bowl III (Jets) 7–16
1969 Los Angeles Rams 11–3 Lost Conference Playoffs (at Vikings) 20–23
NFC West
1970 San Francisco 49ers 10–3–1 Won Divisional Playoffs (at Vikings) 17–14
Lost NFC Championship (Cowboys) 10–17
1971 San Francisco 49ers 9–5 Won Divisional Playoffs (Redskins) 24–20
Lost NFC Championship (at Cowboys) 3–14
1972 San Francisco 49ers 8–5–1 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Cowboys) 28–30
1973 Los Angeles Rams 12–2 Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Cowboys) 16–27
1974 Los Angeles Rams 10–4 Won Divisional Playoffs (Redskins) 19–10
Lost NFC Championship (at Vikings) 10–14
1975 Los Angeles Rams 12–2 Won Divisional Playoffs (Cardinals) 35–23
Lost NFC Championship (Cowboys) 7–37
1976 Los Angeles Rams 10–3–1 Won Divisional Playoffs (at Cowboys) 14–12
Lost NFC Championship (at Vikings) 13–24
1977 Los Angeles Rams 10–4 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Vikings) 7–14
1978 Los Angeles Rams 12–4 Won Divisional Playoffs (Vikings) 34–10
Lost NFC Championship (Cowboys) 0–28
1979 Los Angeles Rams 9–7 Won Divisional Playoffs (at Cowboys) 21–19
Won NFC Championship (at Buccaneers) 9–0
Lost Super Bowl XIV (vs. Steelers) 19–31
1980 Atlanta Falcons 12–4 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Cowboys) 27–30
1981 San Francisco 49ers 13–3 Won Divisional Playoffs (Giants) 38–24
Won NFC Championship (Cowboys) 28–27
Won Super Bowl XVI (vs. Bengals) 26–21
1982* Atlanta Falcons 5–4 Lost First Round playoffs (at Vikings) 24–30
1983 San Francisco 49ers 10–6 Won Divisional Playoffs (Lions) 24–23
Lost NFC Championship (at Redskins) 21–24
1984 San Francisco 49ers 15–1 Won Divisional Playoffs (Giants) 21–10
Won NFC Championship (Bears) 23–0
Won Super Bowl XIX (vs. Dolphins) 38–16
1985 Los Angeles Rams 11–5 Won Divisional Playoffs (Cowboys) 20–0
Lost NFC Championship (at Bears) 0–24
1986 San Francisco 49ers 10–5–1 Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Giants) 3–49
1987 San Francisco 49ers 13–2 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Vikings) 24–36
1988 San Francisco 49ers 10–6 Won Divisional Playoffs (Vikings) 34–9
Won NFC Championship (at Bears) 28–3
Won Super Bowl XXIII (vs. Bengals) 20–16
1989 San Francisco 49ers 14–2 Won Divisional Playoffs (Vikings) 41–13
Won NFC Championship (Rams) 30–3
Won Super Bowl XXIV (vs. Broncos) 55–10
1990 San Francisco 49ers 14–2 Won Divisional Playoffs (Redskins) 28–10
Lost NFC Championship (Giants) 13–15
1991 New Orleans Saints 11–5 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Falcons) 20–27
1992 San Francisco 49ers 14–2 Won Divisional Playoffs (Redskins) 20–13
Lost NFC Championship (Cowboys) 20–30
1993 San Francisco 49ers 10–6 Won Divisional Playoffs (Giants) 44–3
Lost NFC Championship (at Cowboys) 21–38
1994 San Francisco 49ers 13–3 Won Divisional Game (Bears) 44–15
Won NFC Championship Game (Cowboys) 38–28
Won Super Bowl XXIX (vs. Chargers) 49–26
1995 San Francisco 49ers 11–5 Lost NFC Divisional Playoffs (Packers) 17–27
1996 Carolina Panthers 12–4 Won Divisional Game (Cowboys) 26–17
Lost NFC Championship Game (at Packers) 13–30
1997 San Francisco 49ers 13–3 Won Divisional Game (Vikings) 38–22
Lost NFC Championship Game (Packers) 10–23
1998 Atlanta Falcons 14–2 Won Divisional Game (49ers) 20–18
Won NFC Championship Game (at Vikings) 30–27 (OT)
Lost Super Bowl XXXIII (vs. Broncos) 19–34
1999 St. Louis Rams 13–3 Won Divisional Game (Vikings) 49-37
Won NFC Championship Game (Buccaneers) 11–6
Won Super Bowl XXXIV (vs. Titans) 23–16
2000 New Orleans Saints 10–6 Won NFC Wild Card Playoffs (Rams) 31–28
Lost NFC Divisional Playoffs (at Vikings) 16–34
2001 St. Louis Rams 14–2 Won Divisional Game (Packers) 45-17
Won NFC Championship Game (Eagles) 29–24
Lost Super Bowl XXXVI (vs. Patriots) 17–20

Following 2001, the Atlanta Falcons, Carolina Panthers, and New Orleans Saints left the NFC West to join the newly formed NFC South. The Arizona Cardinals joined the NFC West from the NFC East, and the Seattle Seahawks joined from the AFC West to combine with the San Francisco 49ers and the St. Louis Rams to create the new NFC West.

Season Team Record Playoff Results
NFC West
2002 San Francisco 49ers 10–6 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Giants) 39–38
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Buccaneers) 6–31
2003 St. Louis Rams 12–4 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Panthers) 23–29 (2OT)
2004 Seattle Seahawks 9–7 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Rams) 20–27
2005 Seattle Seahawks 13–3 Won Divisional Playoffs (Redskins) 20–10
Won NFC Championship (Panthers) 34–14
Lost Super Bowl XL (vs. Steelers) 10–21
2006 Seattle Seahawks 9–7 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Cowboys) 21–20
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Bears) 24–27 (OT)
2007 Seattle Seahawks 10–6 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Redskins) 35–14
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Packers) 20–42
2008 Arizona Cardinals 9–7 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Falcons) 30–24
Won Divisional Playoffs (at Panthers) 33–13
Won NFC Championship (Eagles) 32–25
Lost Super Bowl XLIII (vs. Steelers) 23–27
2009 Arizona Cardinals 10–6 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Packers) 51–45 (OT)
Lost NFC Divisional Playoffs (at Saints) 14–45
2010 Seattle Seahawks 7–9 Won NFC Wild Card Playoffs (Saints) 41–36
LostNFC Divisional Playoffs (at Bears) 35–24
2011 San Francisco 49ers 13–3 Won Divisional Playoffs (Saints) 36–32
Lost NFC Championship (Giants) 17–20 (OT)
2012 San Francisco 49ers 11–4–1 Won Divisional Playoffs (Packers) 45–31
Won NFC Championship (at Falcons) 28–24
Lost Super Bowl XLVII (vs. Ravens) 31–34
2013 Seattle Seahawks 13–3 Won Divisional Playoffs (Saints) 23–15
Won NFC Championship (49ers) 23–17
Won Super Bowl XLVIII (vs. Broncos) 43–8
2014 Seattle Seahawks 12–4 Won Divisional Playoffs (Panthers) 31–17
Won NFC Championship (Packers) 28–22 (OT)
Lost Super Bowl XLIX (vs. Patriots) 24–28
2015 Arizona Cardinals 13–3 Won Divisional Playoffs (Packers) 26–20 (OT)
Lost NFC Championship (at Panthers) 15–49
2016 Seattle Seahawks 10–5–1 Won NFC Wild Card Playoffs (Lions) 26–6
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Falcons) 20–36
2017 Los Angeles Rams 11–5 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Falcons) 13–26
2018 Los Angeles Rams 13–3[1] Won Divisional Playoffs (Cowboys) 30–22
Won NFC Championship (at Saints) 26–23 (OT)
Lost Super Bowl LIII (vs. Patriots) 3–13

*A players' strike in 1982 reduced the regular season to nine games. Thus, the league used a special sixteen-team playoff tournament for that year only. Division standings were ignored, and Atlanta had the best record of the division teams.

Wild Card qualifiers

Season Team Record Playoff Results
1978 Atlanta Falcons 9–7 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Eagles) 14–13
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Cowboys) 20–27
1980 Los Angeles Rams 11–5 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Cowboys) 13–34
1983 Los Angeles Rams 9–7 Won Wild Card Playoffs (at Cowboys) 24–17
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Redskins) 7–51
1984 Los Angeles Rams 10–6 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Giants) 13–16
1985 San Francisco 49ers 10–6 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Giants) 3–17
1986 Los Angeles Rams 10–6 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Redskins) 7–19
1987 New Orleans Saints 12–3 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Vikings) 10–44
1988 Los Angeles Rams 10–6 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Vikings) 17–28
1989 Los Angeles Rams 11–5 Won Wild Card Playoffs (at Eagles) 21–7
Won Divisional Playoffs (at Giants) 19–13
Lost NFC Championship (at 49ers) 3–30
1990 New Orleans Saints 8–8 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Bears) 6–16
1991 Atlanta Falcons 10–6 Won Wild Card Playoffs (at Saints) 27–20
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Redskins) 7–24
1992 New Orleans Saints 12–4 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Eagles) 20–36
1995 Atlanta Falcons 9–7 Lost NFC Wild Card Playoffs (at Packers) 20–37
1996 San Francisco 49ers 12–4 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Eagles) 14–0
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Packers) 14–35
1998 San Francisco 49ers 12–4 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Packers) 30–27
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Falcons) 18–20
2000 St. Louis Rams 10–6 Lost NFC Wild Card Playoffs (at Saints) 28–31
2001 San Francisco 49ers 12–4 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Packers) 15–25
2003 Seattle Seahawks 10–6 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Packers) 27–33 (OT)
2004 St. Louis Rams 8–8 Won Wild Card Playoffs (at Seahawks) 27–20
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Falcons) 17–47
2012 Seattle Seahawks 11–5 Won Wild Card Playoffs (at Redskins) 24–14
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Falcons) 28–30
2013 San Francisco 49ers 12–4 Won Wild Card Playoffs (at Packers) 23–20
Won Divisional Playoffs (at Panthers) 23–10
Lost NFC Championship (at Seahawks) 17–23
2014 Arizona Cardinals 11–5 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Panthers) 16–27
2015 Seattle Seahawks 10–6 Won NFC Wild Card Playoffs (at Vikings) 10–9
Lost NFC Divisional Playoffs (at Panthers) 24–31
2018 Seattle Seahawks 10–6 Lost NFC Wild Card Playoffs (at Cowboys) 22–24

*A players' strike in 1982 reduced the regular season to nine games. Thus, the league used a special sixteen-team playoff tournament for that year only. Division standings were ignored.

Season results

(#) Denotes team that won the Super Bowl
(#) Denotes team that won the NFC/NFL Championship, but lost Super Bowl
(#) Denotes team that qualified for the NFL Playoffs
Season Team (record)
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th
1967 Los Angeles[a] (11–1–2) Baltimore (11–1–2) San Francisco (7–7) Atlanta (1–12–1)
1968 Baltimore[b] (13–1) Los Angeles (10–3–1) San Francisco (7–6–1) Atlanta (2–12)
1969 Los Angeles (11–3) Baltimore (8–5–1) Atlanta (6–8) San Francisco (4–8–2)
The Coastal Division became the NFC West.
1970 San Francisco (10–3–1) Los Angeles (9–4–1) Atlanta (4–8–2) New Orleans (2–11–1)
1971 San Francisco (9–5) Los Angeles (8–5–1) Atlanta (7–6–1) New Orleans (4–8–2)
1972 San Francisco (8–5–1) Atlanta (7–7) Los Angeles (6–7–1) New Orleans (2–11–1)
1973 Los Angeles (12–2) Atlanta (9–5) San Francisco (5–9) New Orleans (5–9)
1974 Los Angeles (10–4) San Francisco (6–8) New Orleans (5–9) Atlanta (3–11)
1975 (2) Los Angeles (12–2) San Francisco (5–9) Atlanta (4–10) New Orleans (2–12)
1976 (3) Los Angeles (10–3–1) San Francisco (8–6) Atlanta (4–10) New Orleans (4–10) Seattle (2–12)
1977 (2) Los Angeles (10–4) Atlanta (7–7) San Francisco (5–9) New Orleans (3–11)
1978 (1) Los Angeles (12–4) (4) Atlanta (9–7) New Orleans (7–9) San Francisco (2–14)
1979 (3) Los Angeles (9–7) New Orleans (8–8) Atlanta (6–10) San Francisco (2–14)
1980 (1) Atlanta (12–4) (5) Los Angeles (11–5) San Francisco (6–10) New Orleans (1–15)
1981 (1) San Francisco (13–3) Atlanta (7–9) Los Angeles (6–10) New Orleans (4–12)
1982^[c] (5) Atlanta (5–4) New Orleans (4–5) San Francisco (3–6) L.A. Rams (2–7)
1983 (2) San Francisco (10–6) (5) L.A. Rams (9–7) New Orleans (8–8) Atlanta (7–9)
1984 (1) San Francisco (15–1) (4) L.A. Rams (10–6) New Orleans (7–9) Atlanta (4–12)
1985 (2) L.A. Rams (11–5) (5) San Francisco
(10–6)
New Orleans (5–11) Atlanta (4–12)
1986 (3) San Francisco (10–5–1) (5) L.A. Rams (10–6) Atlanta (7–8–1) New Orleans (7–9)
1987 (1) San Francisco (13–2) (4) New Orleans (12–3) L.A. Rams (6–9) Atlanta (3–12)
1988 (2) San Francisco (10–6) (5) L.A. Rams (10–6) New Orleans (10–6) Atlanta (5–11)
1989 (1) San Francisco (14–2) (5) L.A. Rams (11–5) New Orleans (9–7) Atlanta (3–13)
1990 (1) San Francisco (14–2) (6) New Orleans (8–8) L.A. Rams (5–11) Atlanta (5–11)
1991 (3) New Orleans (11–5) (6) Atlanta (10–6) San Francisco (10–6) L.A. Rams (3–13)
1992 (1) San Francisco (14–2) (4) New Orleans (12–4) Atlanta (6–10) L.A. Rams (6–10)
1993 (2) San Francisco (10–6) New Orleans (8–8) Atlanta (6–10) L.A. Rams (5–11)
1994 (1) San Francisco (13–3) New Orleans (7–9) Atlanta (7–9) L.A. Rams (4–12)
1995 (2) San Francisco (11–5) (6) Atlanta (9–7) St. Louis (7–9) Carolina (7–9) New Orleans (7–9)
1996 (2) Carolina (12–4) (4) San Francisco (12–4) St. Louis (6–10) Atlanta (3–13) New Orleans (3–13)
1997 (1) San Francisco (13–3) Carolina (7–9) Atlanta (7–9) New Orleans (6–10) St. Louis (5–11)
1998 (2) Atlanta (14–2) (4) San Francisco (12–4) New Orleans (6–10) Carolina (4–12) St. Louis (4–12)
1999 (1) St. Louis (13–3) Carolina (8–8) Atlanta (5–11) San Francisco (4–12) New Orleans (3–13)
2000 (3) New Orleans (10–6) (6) St. Louis (10–6) Carolina (7–9) San Francisco (6–10) Atlanta (4–12)
2001 (1) St. Louis (14–2) (5) San Francisco (12–4) New Orleans (7–9) Atlanta (7–9) Carolina (1–15)
2002 (4) San Francisco (10–6) St. Louis (7–9) Seattle (7–9) Arizona (5–11)
2003 (2) St. Louis (12–4) (5) Seattle (10–6) San Francisco (7–9) Arizona (4–12)
2004 (4) Seattle (9–7) (5) St. Louis (8–8) Arizona (6–10) San Francisco (2–14)
2005 (1) Seattle (13–3) St. Louis (6–10) Arizona (5–11) San Francisco (4–12)
2006 (4) Seattle (9–7) St. Louis (8–8) San Francisco (7–9) Arizona (5–11)
2007 (3) Seattle (10–6) Arizona (8–8) San Francisco (5–11) St. Louis (3–13)
2008 (4) Arizona (9–7) San Francisco (7–9) Seattle (4–12) St. Louis (2–14)
2009 (4) Arizona (10–6) San Francisco (8–8) Seattle (5–11) St. Louis (1–15)
2010 (4) Seattle (7–9) St. Louis (7–9) San Francisco (6–10) Arizona (5–11)
2011 (2) San Francisco (13–3) Arizona (8–8) Seattle (7–9) St. Louis (2–14)
2012 (2) San Francisco (11–4–1) (5) Seattle (11–5) St. Louis (7–8–1) Arizona (5–11)
2013 (1) Seattle (13–3) (5) San Francisco (12–4) Arizona (10–6) St. Louis (7–9)
2014 (1) Seattle (12–4) (5) Arizona (11–5) San Francisco (8–8) St. Louis (6–10)
2015 (2) Arizona (13–3) (6) Seattle (10–6) St. Louis (7–9) San Francisco (5–11)
2016 (3) Seattle (10–5–1) Arizona (7–8–1) Los Angeles (4–12) San Francisco (2–14)
2017 (3) L.A. Rams (11–5) Seattle (9–7) Arizona (8–8) San Francisco (6–10)
2018 (2) L.A. Rams (13–3) (5) Seattle (10–6) San Francisco (4–12) Arizona (3–13)
Notes and Tiebreakers
  • a Los Angeles won the Coastal Division based on better point differential in head-to-head games (net 24 points) vs. Baltimore. The Rams and Colts played to a 24–24 tie in Baltimore in October before the Rams won 34–10 on the season's final Sunday at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum. The result would be the same under the modern tiebreaker, which relies first on head-to-head record (Los Angeles won the head-to-head series, 1–0–1).
  • b The Baltimore Colts won the NFL Championship, but lost to the AFL's New York Jets in Super Bowl III.
  • c Due to player strikes, the league shortened the 1982 season's games and realigned all the teams into conferences. The records for the division teams are based on what it would have looked like if they were still in the division.

See also

Total playoff berths

(Current NFC West teams' records 1967–2018)
Team Division
Championships
Playoff
Berths
Super Bowl
Appearances
Super Bowl
Wins
San Francisco 49ers1 19 (3) 25 (4) 6 (1) 5 (0)
St. Louis/Los Angeles Rams1 16 (2) 29 (5) 4 (1) 1 (0)
Seattle Seahawks2 8 11 3 1
St. Louis/Phoenix/Arizona Cardinals2 3 4 1 0

To sort table above, click button to right of heading.

1Numbers since re-alignment in parenthesis
2These numbers only reflect the Seahawks & Cardinals' time as members of the NFC West.

References

  1. ^ "NFL Standings". www.nfl.com. Retrieved 2019-02-04.
1971 Los Angeles Rams season

The 1971 Los Angeles Rams season was the team's 34th year with the National Football League and the 26th season in Los Angeles. The team looked to improve on its 9-4-1 record from 1970. The Rams would finish one game below their goal, as they finished 8-5-1 and finished 2nd in the NFC West behind the San Francisco 49ers. The Rams would start out strong, as they started 4-1-1 in their first 6 games before splitting their final 8 games. Despite sweeping the 49ers on the season (the 49ers would win the NFC West at 9-5), a crucial tie against the Atlanta Falcons in week 2 proved to doom the Rams, because had they beaten Atlanta, they would've clinched the NFC West by virtue of their sweep over the 49ers.

1971 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1971 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 22nd year with the National Football League. The 49ers appeared in the NFC Championship Game for the second consecutive year. The team moved into a new home, Candlestick Park. After winning two of their first three games on the road the 49ers lost their first game at Candlestick Park to the Los Angeles Rams 20-13. The 49ers would rebound and win the NFC West for the second year in a row by posting a 9-5 record. However, for the second year in a row the 49ers season ended in disappointment with a 14-3 loss in the NFC Championship Game to the Cowboys in Dallas.

1973 Los Angeles Rams season

The 1973 Los Angeles Rams season was the team's 36th year with the National Football League and the 28th season in Los Angeles. The Rams were 7–0 at home for the first time since 1945. On the road, the Rams were 5–2.

The Rams donned new uniforms, which remained in use until 1994, their final season in Los Angeles, and though they moved to St. Louis in 1995, the uniform tradition continued until 1999, where they won Super Bowl XXXIV, and will wear them for Super Bowl LIII. The uniforms would return for their home games in 2018 and 2019

The Rams finished the season with a brilliant 12-2 record and won the NFC West and appeared in the playoffs for the first time in the post-merger era. However, in their first post-merger playoff game, they lost to the Dallas Cowboys 27-16. This would be the first of 8 straight division titles for the Rams, spanning from 1973-1979.

1974 Los Angeles Rams season

The 1974 Los Angeles Rams season was the team's 37th year with the National Football League and the 29th season in Los Angeles. The Rams looked to improve on its 12-2 season from 1973 and win the NFC West for the 2nd straight season. While not improving on their record, they did win their division for the 2nd straight season with a 10-4 record, which was good enough for the 2nd best record in the NFC. In the playoffs, Los Angeles defeated the Washington Redskins in a rematch of week 13's game, which Washington won 23-17, which turned out to be the Rams only loss at home during the entire season. They won this game 19-10 to advance to the NFC Championship Game for the first time ever. However, they lost to the Minnesota Vikings 14-10 to end their season.

1976 Los Angeles Rams season

The 1976 Los Angeles Rams season was the team's 39th year with the National Football League and the 31st season in Los Angeles. The Rams continued their dominance of the NFC West, winning their 4th straight division title as well as their 4th straight playoff berth. After a record setting 1975 season in which their defense was nearly untouchable, the Rams were picked by many to win the Super Bowl. Despite not improving on its 12-2 record from 1975, the team continued to be one of the best in the NFL. This Rams team is quite notable for setting many records during the season. One good notable record was breaking the franchise record for points scored in a game with 59 in a 59-0 devouring of the Atlanta Falcons. The Rams would ultimately have another year of success, finishing 10-3-1. In the playoffs, they would beat Dallas 14-12 in the Divisional Round of the playoffs. However, the Rams would lose the NFC Championship game to the Minnesota Vikings 24-13.

1976 NFL season

The 1976 NFL season was the 57th regular season of the National Football League. The year 1976 was also the Bicentennial of the United States although the NFL did not issue its own Bicentennial patch. The Dallas Cowboys did modify their helmet (red, white and blue stripes) to honor the year, and were the only NFL team to recognize the Bicentennial.The league expanded to 28 teams with the addition of the Seattle Seahawks and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. This fulfilled one of the conditions agreed to in 1966 for the 1970 AFL–NFL merger, which called for the league to expand to 28 teams by 1970 or soon thereafter.

For this season only, the Seahawks played in the NFC West while the Buccaneers played in the AFC West. The Seahawks would return to the NFC West with the realignment prior to the 2002 season. The Buccaneers would set a record of futility, becoming the first NFL team to finish a season 0–14. The Buccaneers would go on to lose their first 26 games as a franchise before finally winning against the New Orleans Saints and St. Louis Cardinals to finish the 1977 season.

The New York Giants finally opened their new Giants Stadium after spending two seasons at the Yale Bowl and one season at Shea Stadium.

The season ended with Super Bowl XI when the Oakland Raiders defeated the Minnesota Vikings 32–14 in the Rose Bowl.

1985 Los Angeles Rams season

The 1985 Los Angeles Rams season was the franchise's 48th season in the National Football League, their 38th overall, and their 40th in the Greater Los Angeles Area. The Rams played in the NFC Championship Game, but were shutout by the eventual Super Bowl champion Chicago Bears. Eric Dickerson rushed for 1,234 yards in 1985 while missing the first two games while in a contract dispute. He missed the Pro Bowl for the first time in his short NFL career. He did, however, go on to rush for a playoff record 248 yards against the Dallas Cowboys in post-season play. It was also the last time the Rams would win an NFC West divisional title for Los Angeles until 2017, and the last NFC West title until 1999 while they were in St. Louis.

1986 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1986 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 37th year with the National Football League. The team returned to the top of the NFC West after a one-year absence, and lost the Divisional Playoffs to the Giants.

Joe Montana suffered a back injury in Week 1 and was lost for two months after surgery. Because the injury was so severe, doctors forced him to retire. However, Montana did return for Week 10 against the then-St. Louis Cardinals. Montana shared Comeback Player of the Year honors with Minnesota's Tommy Kramer at the end of the season.

2003 St. Louis Rams season

The 2003 St. Louis Rams season was the team's 66th year with the National Football League and the ninth season in St. Louis. The Rams were coming off a disappointing 7–9 season and former MVP Kurt Warner was demoted to backup quarterback; Marc Bulger earned the starting job after replacing Warner in 2002 and winning six of his seven starts. Though many agree that The Greatest Show on Turf ended after the 2001 season, the Rams nonetheless finished 12–4, winning the NFC West, only to lose to the eventual NFC champions Carolina Panthers. This would be the last time the Rams won the NFC West until the 2017 NFL season.

For the first time in 19 years, the Rams lost a playoff game at home. 2003 was also the last winning season that the Rams would achieve in St. Louis and was their last winning season anywhere until 2017 in Los Angeles. They did make the playoffs the following season despite a mediocre 8-8 record and are considered one of the worst teams to make the playoffs, along with the 2010 Seahawks (7-9) and the 1998 Cardinals (9-7).

Bulger was voted to play in the Pro Bowl following the season and was the game's MVP. As for Kurt Warner, he was released after the season in order to clear up cap space, and Bulger would spend the next six seasons as the Rams' starting quarterback.

History of the Los Angeles Rams

The Los Angeles Rams are a professional American football team that play in the National Football League (NFL). The Rams franchise was founded in 1936 as the Cleveland Rams in the short-lived second American Football League before joining the NFL the next year. In 1946, the franchise moved to Los Angeles. The Rams franchise remained in the metro area until 1994, when they moved to St. Louis, and were known as the St. Louis Rams from 1995 to 2015. The Rams franchise returned to Los Angeles in 2016. This article chronicles the franchise's history during their time in Los Angeles, from playing at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum between 1946 and 1979, to playing at Anaheim Stadium (now known as Angel Stadium of Anaheim) in Anaheim from 1980 to 1994, and its return to Southern California beginning with the 2016 season.

History of the St. Louis Rams

The professional American football franchise now known as the Los Angeles Rams played in St. Louis, Missouri, as the St. Louis Rams from the 1995 through the 2015 seasons. The Rams franchise relocated from Los Angeles to St. Louis in 1995, which had been without a National Football League (NFL) team since the Cardinals moved to Phoenix, Arizona in 1988. The team's primary stadium was The Dome at America's Center, which was known as the Trans World Dome and the Edward Jones Dome while utilized by the Rams.

The Rams’ first home game in St. Louis was at Busch Memorial Stadium, where they played before the Dome was completed, in a 17-13 victory against the New Orleans Saints on September 10, 1995. Later that season, they played their first game at the newly-completed Dome on November 12 in a 28-17 victory against the Carolina Panthers. Their last game played in St. Louis was against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers on December 17, 2015, which they won, 31–23. The Rams’ last game as a St. Louis-based club was on January 3, 2016, against the San Francisco 49ers at Levi's Stadium, where they lost in overtime 19–16. Following the 2015 NFL season, the team returned to Los Angeles.

During the Rams' tenure in St. Louis, the franchise won its first and, to date, only Super Bowl title during the 1999 season in XXXIV and also made Super Bowl XXXVI two years later but were upset by the New England Patriots in the game that began the Patriots dynasty. Assisted by the Greatest Show on Turf offense, the Rams enjoyed their greatest period of success from 1999 to 2006, but struggled throughout their remaining years in St. Louis. Upon their relocation back to Los Angeles, the Rams went 12 seasons without obtaining a winning record and 11 seasons without qualifying for the postseason.

List of Arizona Cardinals seasons

This is a list of seasons completed by the Arizona Cardinals. The Cardinals are an American football franchise competing as a member of the West division of the National Football Conference (NFC) in the National Football League (NFL). The list documents the season-by-season records of the Cardinals' franchise from 1920 to present, including postseason records, and league awards for individual players or head coaches.

List of Atlanta Falcons seasons

This article is a list of seasons completed by the Atlanta Falcons American football franchise of the National Football League (NFL). The list documents the season-by-season records of the Falcons' franchise from 1966 to present, including postseason records, and league awards for individual players or head coaches.

The Falcons did not record consecutive winning seasons until 2009, when the team won their final three games of the regular season and finished with a 9–7 record after winning their season finale against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. Atlanta has since added its first stretch of five straight winning seasons, with a 13–3 record in 2010, a 10–6 record in 2011, and a 13–3 record in 2012. The streak ended with a 4–12 record in 2013.

List of Carolina Panthers seasons

The Carolina Panthers are a professional American football team based in Charlotte, North Carolina. The team was founded in 1993, when, along with the Jacksonville Jaguars, they were accepted into the National Football League (NFL) as an expansion team. The Panthers are owned by David Tepper.

The Carolina Panthers began play in 1995, and spent their first 7 seasons in the NFC West division, making it to the NFC Championship game in 1996, which was only their 2nd year as a football franchise.

In 2002, the Panthers were moved to the NFC South after the NFL realigned their divisions due to the Houston Texans joining the league as an expansion team. Over their 20 seasons in the NFL, the Panthers have played in over 300 games, winning 6 division titles (one in the NFC West and five in the NFC South) and reaching the NFL playoffs 8 times. The Panthers have never had back-to-back winning seasons, but recorded their first back-to-back-to-back playoff seasons in 2013 and 2014, becoming the first team in the history of the NFC South to win consecutive division titles in the process. They won a third consecutive division title in 2015, finishing with a league-best 15–1 record and securing homefield advantage in the playoffs for the first time in team history.

The team's worst regular season record was 2001, where they finished 1–15, worst in the league for that season; although they won their first game, they lost each of the remaining 15. Their best regular season record was accomplished in 2015, when they finished 15–1. The team has reached the Super Bowl twice; in 2003, when they lost Super Bowl XXXVIII 29–32 to the New England Patriots, and 2015, when they lost Super Bowl 50 10–24 to the Denver Broncos. Overall, the team has recorded 7 winning seasons, 12 losing seasons, and three 8–8 seasons; they have reached the playoffs 8 times. Including the playoffs, they have an overall record of 192 wins, 191 losses, and 1 tie (.501 winning percentage).

List of Los Angeles Rams seasons

This article is a list of seasons completed by the Los Angeles Rams American football franchise (known as the Cleveland Rams from 1936 to 1945 and the St. Louis Rams from 1995 to 2015) in organized play. The list documents the season-by-season records of the Los Angeles Rams franchise from 1936 to present, including conference standings, division standings, postseason records, league awards for individual players or head coaches, and team awards for individual players. The Rams franchise was founded in Cleveland in 1936 when the team was playing in the newly formed American Football League (AFL). The franchise joined the National Football League (NFL) the following year. In 1943 operations were suspended due a depleted player roster due to World War II, and play resumed the following year. The Rams were the only team to suspend completely in 1943. The franchise has changed home cities thrice, moving to Los Angeles in 1946, moving to St. Louis in 1995, and returning to Los Angeles in 2016.

The franchise has had three periods of success in their history. The first period of came as the Cleveland Rams in NFL when they won the NFL Championship. This period continued until the 1950s as the Los Angeles Rams with them making the playoffs a further five times. The second period of success lasted over 20 years between 1966–1989 where the Rams made the playoffs 16 times and captured ten NFC Division titles including a then-record run of seven in a row from the 1973 season through the 1979 seasons (the New England Patriots broke the record with nine straight AFC East division titles from the 2009 season through the 2017 season). However, this period of success was marred by the fact that the franchise did not win the Super Bowl and only one Conference Championship. The most recent period of success began in 1999 as the St. Louis Rams when the Rams capped a surprisingly successful season (after going 4–12 the previous year) by winning Super Bowl XXXIV against the Tennessee Titans. This period continued until 2004 but the franchise failed to win another Super Bowl and suffered a surprise defeat to the New England Patriots in Super Bowl XXXVI.

Alternating with their successful periods, the Rams have experienced severe periods of failure. As the NFL Cleveland Rams they failed to record a single winning season until their final year in the city, whilst from 1956 to 1965 they never won as many games as they lost and in 1962 won just one game. Between 1990 and 1998, affected in part by failure to obtain stadium improvements in Los Angeles and a move to Missouri, the Rams had nine consecutive losing seasons, and after the collapse of "The Greatest Show on Turf" suffered thirteen consecutive seasons without a winning record between 2004 and 2016. Their three-season record between 2007 and 2009 of 6–42 was the worst over such a period between the Chicago Cardinals during World War II and the 4–44 Cleveland Browns from 2015 to 2017.

Over the course of the Rams’ 71-year history, they have won 15 division titles. They have appeared in the postseason 27 times, winning three NFC Championships. During the Super Bowl era, they have played in three Super Bowls, winning one.

List of New Orleans Saints seasons

This article is a list of seasons completed by the New Orleans Saints American football franchise of the National Football League (NFL). The list documents the season-by-season records of the Saints' franchise from 1967 to present, including postseason records, and league awards for individual players or head coach.

List of San Francisco 49ers seasons

This article is a list of seasons completed by the San Francisco 49ers, an American football franchise representing the San Francisco Bay Area. The 49ers are members of the West division in the National Football Conference (NFC) of the National Football League (NFL). The list documents the season-by-season records of the 49ers' franchise from 1946 to present, including postseason records, and league awards for individual players or head coaches. The San Francisco 49ers began play in 1946 as charter members of the All-America Football Conference. When the 49ers joined the NFL after the AAFC-NFL merger in 1950, they never won a division or conference title, and only finished as high as second once from 1950–1969. After winning three consecutive division titles from 1970–1972, they would return to losing in 1973 and achieved only one winning season for the rest of the decade. Another playoff drought lasted from 2003–2010, a stretch of eight non-winning seasons. This drought came to an end when the 49ers won their division with a 13–3 record in 2011; they earned three straight berths in the NFC Championship Game.

List of Seattle Seahawks seasons

This article is a compilation of the list of seasons completed by the Seattle Seahawks American football franchise of the National Football League (NFL). The list documents the season-by-season records of the Seahawks' franchise from 1976 to present, including postseason records, and league awards for individual players or head coaches. As of the end of the 2018 NFL season, the Seahawks have 23 winning seasons, 17 losing seasons, and 4 seasons where they finished 8–8. With a 35–6 Week 14 win over the Baltimore Ravens on December 13 during the 2015 season, not only did the Seahawks improved to 8–5 at that point in the season, but the Seahawks' all–time franchise regular season win–loss record improved to 313–312–0; this marked the first time ever in team history that the Seahawks have had an overall winning regular season win–loss record (a win–loss record above .500). The Seahawks are the one of four North American men's professional sports teams that have played in Seattle with an all–time winning record, after the Seattle Metropolitans (the first American team to win the Stanley Cup in 1917, folded in 1924), the Seattle SuperSonics (who relocated to Oklahoma City and became the Thunder in the summer of 2008), and the Seattle Sounders FC (established in 2007 as an expansion franchise, currently active). Therefore, the Seahawks are currently one of two active North American men's professional sports team located in Seattle with an overall winning record. On October 23, 2016, the Seahawks played the Arizona Cardinals at University of Phoenix Stadium and the game ended in a 6–6 tie after OT, which was the first time this ever happened in franchise history.

NFC South

The National Football Conference – Southern Division or NFC South is one of the four divisions of the National Football Conference (NFC) in the National Football League (NFL). It was created prior to the 2002 NFL season, when the league realigned divisions after expanding to 32 teams. The NFC South currently has four member clubs: the Atlanta Falcons, Carolina Panthers, New Orleans Saints, and Tampa Bay Buccaneers. Prior to the 2002 season, the Buccaneers belonged to the AFC West (1976) and NFC Central (1977–2001), while the other three teams were part of the geographically inaccurate NFC West. As a matter of fact, the South has more multiple-season members of the old NFC West than the current NFC West does (the Seattle Seahawks are in the current West, but they only played in that division during their inaugural season).

The NFC South is the only division since the 2002 realignment to have each of its teams make a conference championship game appearance as well as a Super Bowl appearance: Tampa Bay (2002), Atlanta (2004, 2012, and 2016), Carolina (2003, 2005 and 2015), and New Orleans (2006, 2009, and 2018). Also since 2002, each team has won at least three division titles, the only such division in the league. It is also the only NFL division to have zero division sweeps by any of its member teams.

Entering 2016, the Saints have the most wins among division members. The Saints record is 356–435–5; their win in Super Bowl XLIV is the highlight of an 8–9 playoff record. The Falcons record is 330–432–6 with a playoff record of 9–13; the Falcons lost in Super Bowls XXXIII and LI, the latter in overtime. The Buccaneers record is 241–386–1 with a victory in their only Super Bowl appearance, Super Bowl XXXVII, and an overall playoff record of 6–9. The Panthers have the best playoff record (9–8) of any team in the division with losses in Super Bowls XXXVIII and 50 and the best overall record in the division (166–169–1).

The NFC South is the only NFC division not to have any teams that predate the 1960 launch of the American Football League, the NFL’s former rival league. The oldest team is the Falcons, who began play in 1966, and the Saints began play only a year later in 1967. Each of the other NFC divisions has 3 teams that began play earlier than 1960, while the remaining three such teams are in the American Football Conference.

The NFC South became the second division in five years to have a champion with a losing record, as the 2014 Carolina Panthers won the division with a 7–8–1 record. (The 2010 Seattle Seahawks won the NFC West with a 7–9 record.) Additionally, Carolina became the first team to repeat as NFC South champions since the creation of the division. The Panthers are the only team to win the NFC South three consecutive times from 2013 to 2015. On January 7, 2018 two NFC South teams (Carolina Panthers and New Orleans Saints) met in the NFL playoffs for the first time since the division was created in 2002.

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