NFC South

The National Football Conference – Southern Division or NFC South is one of the four divisions of the National Football Conference (NFC) in the National Football League (NFL). It was created prior to the 2002 NFL season, when the league realigned divisions after expanding to 32 teams. The NFC South currently has four member clubs: the Atlanta Falcons, Carolina Panthers, New Orleans Saints, and Tampa Bay Buccaneers. Prior to the 2002 season, the Buccaneers belonged to the AFC West (1976) and NFC Central (19772001), while the other three teams were part of the geographically inaccurate NFC West. As a matter of fact, the South has more multiple-season members of the old NFC West than the current NFC West does (the Seattle Seahawks are in the current West, but they only played in that division during their inaugural season).

The NFC South is the only division since the 2002 realignment to have each of its teams make a conference championship game appearance as well as a Super Bowl appearance: Tampa Bay (2002), Atlanta (2004, 2012, and 2016), Carolina (2003, 2005 and 2015), and New Orleans (2006, 2009, and 2018). Also since 2002, each team has won at least three division titles, the only such division in the league. It is also the only NFL division to have zero division sweeps by any of its member teams.

Entering 2016, the Saints have the most wins among division members. The Saints record is 356–435–5; their win in Super Bowl XLIV is the highlight of an 8–9 playoff record. The Falcons record is 330–432–6 with a playoff record of 9–13; the Falcons lost in Super Bowls XXXIII and LI, the latter in overtime. The Buccaneers record is 241–386–1 with a victory in their only Super Bowl appearance, Super Bowl XXXVII, and an overall playoff record of 6–9. The Panthers have the best playoff record (9–8) of any team in the division with losses in Super Bowls XXXVIII and 50 and the best overall record in the division (166–169–1).

The NFC South is the only NFC division not to have any teams that predate the 1960 launch of the American Football League, the NFL’s former rival league. The oldest team is the Falcons, who began play in 1966, and the Saints began play only a year later in 1967. Each of the other NFC divisions has 3 teams that began play earlier than 1960, while the remaining three such teams are in the American Football Conference.

The NFC South became the second division in five years to have a champion with a losing record, as the 2014 Carolina Panthers won the division with a 7–8–1 record. (The 2010 Seattle Seahawks won the NFC West with a 7–9 record.) Additionally, Carolina became the first team to repeat as NFC South champions since the creation of the division. The Panthers are the only team to win the NFC South three consecutive times from 2013 to 2015. On January 7, 2018 two NFC South teams (Carolina Panthers and New Orleans Saints) met in the NFL playoffs for the first time since the division was created in 2002.

NFC South
ConferenceNational Football Conference
LeagueNational Football League
SportAmerican football
Founded2002
CountryUnited States
Teams
No. of teams4
Championships
Most recent NFC South champion(s)New Orleans Saints (5th title)
Most NFC South titlesNew Orleans Saints and Carolina Panthers (5 titles)

Division lineups

Place cursor over year for division champ or Super Bowl team.

NFC South Division
02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
Atlanta Falcons
Carolina Panthers
New Orleans Saints
Tampa Bay Buccaneers
     Division Won Super Bowl      Division Won NFC Championship

Division champions

Season Team Record Playoff Results
2002 Tampa Bay Buccaneers 12–4 Won Divisional Playoffs (49ers) 31–6
Won NFC Championship (at Eagles) 27–10
Won Super Bowl XXXVII (vs. Raiders) 48–21
2003 Carolina Panthers 11–5 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Cowboys) 29–10
Won Divisional Playoffs (at Rams) 29–23 (2OT)
Won NFC Championship (at Eagles) 14–3
Lost Super Bowl XXXVIII (vs. Patriots) 29–32
2004 Atlanta Falcons 11–5 Won Divisional Playoffs (Rams) 47–17
Lost NFC Championship (at Eagles) 10–27
2005 Tampa Bay Buccaneers 11–5 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Redskins) 10–17
2006 New Orleans Saints 10–6 Won Divisional Playoffs (Eagles) 27–24
Lost NFC Championship (at Bears) 14–39
2007 Tampa Bay Buccaneers 9–7 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Giants) 14–24
2008 Carolina Panthers 12–4 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Cardinals) 13–33
2009 New Orleans Saints 13–3 Won Divisional Playoffs (Cardinals) 45–14
Won NFC Championship (Vikings) 31–28 (OT)
Won Super Bowl XLIV (vs. Colts) 31–17
2010 Atlanta Falcons 13–3 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Packers) 21–48
2011 New Orleans Saints 13–3 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Lions) 45–28
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at 49ers) 32–36
2012 Atlanta Falcons 13–3 Won Divisional Playoffs (Seahawks) 30–28
Lost NFC Championship (49ers) 24–28
2013 Carolina Panthers 12–4 Lost Divisional Playoffs (49ers) 10–23
2014 Carolina Panthers 7–8–1 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Cardinals) 27–16
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Seahawks) 17–31
2015 Carolina Panthers 15–1 Won Divisional Playoffs (Seahawks) 31–24
Won NFC Championship (Cardinals) 49–15
Lost Super Bowl 50 (vs. Broncos) 10–24
2016 Atlanta Falcons 11–5 Won Divisional Playoffs (Seahawks) 36–20
Won NFC Championship (Packers) 44–21
Lost Super Bowl LI (vs. Patriots) 28–34 (OT)
2017 New Orleans Saints 11–5 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Panthers) 31–26
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Vikings) 24–29
2018 New Orleans Saints 13–3 Won Divisional Playoffs (Eagles) 20–14
Lost NFC Championship (Rams) 23–26 (OT)

Wild Card qualifiers

Season Team Record Playoff Results
2002 Atlanta Falcons 9–6–1 Won Wild Card Playoffs (at Packers) 27–7
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Eagles) 6–20
2005 Carolina Panthers 11–5 Won Wild Card Playoffs (at Giants) 23–0
Won Divisional Playoffs (at Bears) 29–21
Lost NFC Championship (at Seahawks) 14–34
2008 Atlanta Falcons 11–5 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Cardinals) 24–30
2010 New Orleans Saints 11–5 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Seahawks) 36–41
2011 Atlanta Falcons 10–6 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Giants) 2–24
2013 New Orleans Saints 11–5 Won Wild Card Playoffs (at Eagles) 26–24
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Seahawks) 15–23
2017 Carolina Panthers 11–5 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Saints) 26–31
Atlanta Falcons 10–6 Won Wild Card Playoffs (at Rams) 26–13
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Eagles) 10–15

Total Playoff Berths

(NFC South records since 2002)

Team Division
Titles
Playoff
Berths
NFC
Championships
Super Bowl
Championships
Atlanta Falcons 4 8 1 0
Carolina Panthers 5 7 2 0
New Orleans Saints 5 7 1 1
Tampa Bay Buccaneers 3 3 1 1

Season results

(#) Denotes team that won the Super Bowl
(#) Denotes team that won the NFC Championship
(#) Denotes team that qualified for the NFL Playoffs
Season Team (record)
1st 2nd 3rd 4th
2002 (2) Tampa Bay (12–4) (6) Atlanta (9–6–1) New Orleans (9–7) Carolina (7–9)
2003 (3) Carolina (11–5) New Orleans (8–8) Tampa Bay (7–9) Atlanta (5–11)
2004 (2) Atlanta (11–5) New Orleans (8–8) Carolina (7–9) Tampa Bay (5–11)
2005 (3) Tampa Bay[a] (11–5) (5) Carolina (11–5) Atlanta (8–8) New Orleans (3–13)
2006 (2) New Orleans (10–6) Carolina (8–8) Atlanta (7–9) Tampa Bay (4–12)
2007 (4) Tampa Bay (9–7) Carolina[b] (7–9) New Orleans (7–9) Atlanta (4–12)
2008 (2) Carolina (12–4) (5) Atlanta (11–5) Tampa Bay (9–7) New Orleans (8–8)
2009 (1) New Orleans (13–3) Atlanta (9–7) Carolina (8–8) Tampa Bay (3–13)
2010 (1) Atlanta (13–3) (5) New Orleans (11–5) Tampa Bay (10–6) Carolina (2–14)
2011 (3) New Orleans (13–3) (5) Atlanta (10–6) Carolina (6–10) Tampa Bay (4–12)
2012 (1) Atlanta (13–3) Carolina[c] (7–9) New Orleans[c] (7–9) Tampa Bay (7–9)
2013 (2) Carolina (12–4) (6) New Orleans (11–5) Atlanta[d] (4–12) Tampa Bay (4–12)
2014 (4) Carolina (7–8–1) New Orleans (7–9) Atlanta (6–10) Tampa Bay (2–14)
2015 (1) Carolina (15–1) Atlanta (8–8) New Orleans (7–9) Tampa Bay (6–10)
2016 (2) Atlanta (11–5) Tampa Bay (9–7) New Orleans (7–9) Carolina (6–10)
2017 (4) New Orleans[e] (11–5) (5) Carolina[e] (11–5) (6) Atlanta (10–6) Tampa Bay (5–11)
2018 (1) New Orleans (13–3) Atlanta[f] (7–9) Carolina[f] (7–9) Tampa Bay (5–11)
Tiebreakers
  • a Tampa Bay finished ahead of Carolina based on better division record (5–1 to 4–2).
  • b Carolina finished in second place in the NFC South over New Orleans based on a better conference record (7–5 to 6–6).
  • c Carolina and New Orleans finished ahead of Tampa Bay in the NFC South based on record versus common opponents (5–5 to 4–6), while Carolina finished in second place based on a head-to-head sweep over New Orleans.
  • d Atlanta finished ahead of Tampa Bay based on a better conference record (3–9 to 2–10).
  • e New Orleans finished ahead of Carolina based on head-to-head sweep.

Schedule rotation

Year Opponents
Interconf. Intraconf.
2017 AFC East NFC North
2018 AFC North NFC East
2019 AFC South NFC West
2020 AFC West NFC North
2021 AFC East NFC East
2022 AFC North NFC West
2023 AFC South NFC North
2024 AFC West NFC East
2025 AFC East NFC West
2026 AFC North NFC North
2027 AFC South NFC East
2028 AFC West NFC West

Postseason oddities

  • From 2003 to 2009, the team that placed last in the division the previous year would improve enough to reach the playoffs, usually by winning the division. Tampa Bay almost continued this trend in 2010, stopped only by losing a tiebreaker to Green Bay.
    • Carolina finished last in 2002 (7–9) and finished first in 2003 (11–5).
    • Atlanta finished last in 2003 (5–11) and finished first in 2004 (11–5).
    • Tampa Bay finished last in 2004 (5–11) and finished first in 2005 (11–5).
    • New Orleans finished last in 2005 (3–13) and finished first in 2006 (10–6).
    • Tampa Bay finished last in 2006 (4–12) and finished first in 2007 (9–7).
    • Atlanta finished last in 2007 (4–12) and finished second with a wild-card berth in 2008 (11–5).
    • New Orleans finished last in 2008 (8–8) and finished first in 2009 (13–3).
    • Tampa Bay finished last in 2009 (3–13) but despite finishing third in 2010 with a 10–6 record, did not make the playoffs, due to Green Bay holding the wild-card tiebreakers.
    • Carolina finished last in 2010 (2–14) and was eliminated from playoff contention in Week 14 of the 2011 season after going 4–9, becoming the first NFC South team to have a losing season after placing last in the division.
  • From 2002 to 2009, no team in the NFC South earned back-to-back playoff appearances. In Week 16 of the 2010 season, New Orleans clinched a wild-card berth, becoming the first NFC South team to earn consecutive playoff appearances. New Orleans earned three consecutive playoff appearances in the 2009, 2010, and 2011 seasons. Atlanta also earned three consecutive playoff appearances, in 2010, 2011 and 2012 and Carolina in 2013, 2014 and 2015.
  • Each team has won the division at least three times and made a playoff appearance at least three times since the division's formation. Tampa Bay is the only team which has not made the playoffs as a wild-card.
  • Each team has finished last in the division at least twice since the division's formation. Prior to 2012, no team has finished last in the division in consecutive seasons. Tampa Bay became the first team in the division to place last in the division in consecutive seasons, and have recently finished last for the fourth consecutive season.
  • The NFC South is the only NFL division where no member team has swept the division during a regular season.
  • From 2002 to 2011, there was an outright last place finisher in the division (i.e.: tiebreakers were not necessary to determine who finished last). That streak came to an end during the 2012 season, when Tampa Bay, New Orleans, and Carolina all finished at 7–9. This happened again in 2013, where both Atlanta and Tampa Bay finished 4–12.
  • In 2014, Carolina became the first team to defend the NFC South title. No other team in the division has managed to do so until New Orleans defeated Tampa Bay on December 9, 2018 and clinched the division for the second straight season.
  • In 2014, Carolina became the second team in NFL history to win its division and advance to the playoffs with a losing record (7–8–1). The first team to accomplish this is the 2010 Seahawks, who won the NFC West with a 7–9 record and beat New Orleans in the Wild Card game.
  • With Atlanta winning the 2016–17 NFC Championship, the NFC South became the first division since the 2002 realignment to have all four of its teams represent the NFC in the Super Bowl. (Tampa Bay 2003, Carolina 2004 and 2016, New Orleans 2010, Atlanta 2017).
  • In the 2017 NFL season the NFC South had three of its teams qualify for the playoffs (Atlanta, New Orleans, Carolina). It was also the first time where two NFC South teams met in the playoffs, when New Orleans hosted Carolina in the Wild Card playoffs.

See also

2005 Tampa Bay Buccaneers season

The 2005 Tampa Bay Buccaneers season was the franchise's 30th season in the National Football League.

The season began with the team trying to improve on their 5–11 record in 2004 and The Bucs made a complete rebound from last season to make the playoffs since 2003 with an 11-5 record. Cadillac Williams won Offensive Rookie of the Year.

The Bucs would lose in the Wild-Card playoff game at home to the 2005 Redskins.

2008 Carolina Panthers season

The 2008 Carolina Panthers season was the franchise's 14th season in the National Football League They entered the season and improved on their 7–9 record from 2007, winning the NFC South. Their 12–4 finish tied their second best record in franchise history, which occurred in the 1996 season, however this was surpassed by the 2015 season with a 15-1 record. The second-seeded Panthers were upset at home in the divisional playoffs by the eventual NFC Champion Arizona Cardinals, 33-13.

2013 Carolina Panthers season

The 2013 Carolina Panthers season was the franchise's 19th season in the National Football League and the third under head coach Ron Rivera. NFL.com ranked the Panthers' schedule as the strongest in the league, with opponents having a combined 2012 record of 138–116–2 and a winning percentage of .543.After starting the season 1–3, the Panthers went 11–1 the rest of the way, including a then-record eight-game winning streak, securing their first winning season and playoff appearance since 2008, the first winning season under Rivera and the fifth in franchise history. They also notched their third NFC South title, their first since 2008 and their fourth division title overall. The Panthers' season ended in the Divisional round of the playoffs with a 23–10 loss to the San Francisco 49ers.

2014 Carolina Panthers season

The 2014 Carolina Panthers season was the franchise's 20th season in the National Football League and the fourth under head coach Ron Rivera.

The Panthers captured their second straight NFC South division title and qualified for the postseason for the first time in back-to-back years despite failing to improve on a 12–4 record and finishing with a losing record of 7–8–1. Additionally, they became the first team in NFC South history to have back to back division titles and also became the second team to win a division title with a sub-.500 record, the first team being the 2010 Seattle Seahawks. The Panthers defeated the Arizona Cardinals in the Wild Card round, but lost to Seattle in the Divisional round.

2016 Atlanta Falcons season

The 2016 Atlanta Falcons season was the franchise's 51st season in the National Football League and the second under head coach Dan Quinn. It also marked the team's 25th and final season playing their home games at the Georgia Dome, as the Falcons moved into the new Mercedes-Benz Stadium in 2017. The Falcons won the NFC South for the first time since 2012 and improved on their 8–8 record from 2015, going 11–5 and earning the second seed in the NFC playoffs. Quarterback Matt Ryan was named the 2016 NFL MVP.The falcons scored 540 points, 1st in the league

The Falcons defeated the Seattle Seahawks 36–20 in the Divisional Round to advance to the NFC Championship Game for the first time since 2012. In the NFC Championship game, they defeated the Green Bay Packers, 44–21, to advance to their second Super Bowl appearance in franchise history; they had competed in Super Bowl XXXIII 18 years earlier. In Super Bowl LI, the Falcons faced the New England Patriots, and built a 28–3 lead midway through the third quarter, before surrendering 25 consecutive points, forcing overtime for the first time in Super Bowl history where they went on to lose 28-34.

2017 New Orleans Saints season

The 2017 New Orleans Saints season was the franchise's 51st season in the National Football League, the 42nd to host games at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome and the eleventh under head coach Sean Payton. The team improved on their 7–9 output from last season, while achieving an 8-game winning streak after losing their first two contests, their longest streak (tied with their 2011 team) since 2009, when they won Super Bowl XLIV. In Week 13 the Saints clinched their first winning season since 2013 and swept the Carolina Panthers for the first time since 2011. In Week 16, the Saints clinched a playoff spot for the first time since 2013 by defeating the Atlanta Falcons. In Week 17, the Saints clinched the NFC South for the first time since 2011 with the Panthers loss to the Falcons. On January 7, 2018 the Saints played their divisional rivals the Carolina Panthers in the playoffs for the first time in franchise history. They beat Carolina for the third time, 31–26 in the Wild Card, but fell to the Minnesota Vikings 24–29 in the Divisional Round in a dramatic ending.

This year was Tom Benson's final season as owner of the Saints, as he died at the age of 90 on March 15, 2018 from influenza.

Atlanta Falcons

The Atlanta Falcons are a professional American football team based in Atlanta, Georgia. The Falcons compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's National Football Conference (NFC) South division. The Falcons joined the NFL in 1965 as an expansion team, after the NFL offered then-owner Rankin Smith a franchise to keep him from joining the rival American Football League (AFL).

In their 53 years of existence (through 2018), the Falcons have compiled a record of 368–466–6 (358–452–6 in the regular season and 10–14 in the playoffs), winning division championships in 1980, 1998, 2004, 2010, 2012, and 2016. The Falcons have appeared in two Super Bowls, the first during the 1998 season in Super Bowl XXXIII, where they lost to the Denver Broncos 34–19, and the second was eighteen years later, a 34–28 overtime defeat by the New England Patriots in Super Bowl LI.

The Falcons' current home field is Mercedes-Benz Stadium, which opened for the 2017 season; the team's headquarters and practice facilities are located at a fifty-acre (20 ha) site in Flowery Branch, northeast of Atlanta in Hall County.

Carolina Panthers

The Carolina Panthers are a professional American football team based in Charlotte, North Carolina. The Panthers compete in the National Football League (NFL), as a member club of the league's National Football Conference (NFC) South division. The team is headquartered in Bank of America Stadium in uptown Charlotte; also the team's home field. They are one of the few NFL teams to own the stadium they play in, which is legally registered as Panthers Stadium, LLC. The Panthers are supported throughout the Carolinas; although the team has played its home games in Charlotte since 1996, it played home games at Memorial Stadium in Clemson, South Carolina during its first season. The team hosts its annual training camp at Wofford College in Spartanburg, South Carolina. The head coach is Ron Rivera.

The Panthers were announced as the league's 29th franchise in 1993, and began play in 1995 under original owner and founder Jerry Richardson. The Panthers played well in their first two years, finishing 7–9 in 1995 (an all-time best for an NFL expansion team's first season) and 12–4 the following year, winning the NFC West before ultimately losing to the eventual Super Bowl champion Green Bay Packers in the NFC Championship Game. They did not have another winning season until 2003, when they won the NFC Championship Game and reached Super Bowl XXXVIII, losing 32–29 to the New England Patriots. After recording playoff appearances in 2005 and 2008, the team failed to record another playoff appearance until 2013, the first of three consecutive NFC South titles. After losing in the divisional round to the San Francisco 49ers in 2013 and the Seattle Seahawks in 2014, the Panthers returned to the Super Bowl in 2015, but lost to the Denver Broncos. The Panthers have reached the playoffs seven times, advancing to four NFC Championship Games and two Super Bowls. They have won six division titles, one in the NFC West and five in the NFC South.

The Carolina Panthers are legally registered as Panther Football, LLC. and are controlled by David Tepper, whose purchase of the team from founder Jerry Richardson was unanimously approved by league owners on May 22, 2018. The club is worth approximately US$2.3 billion, according to Forbes.

John Fox (American football)

John Fox (born February 8, 1955) is a former American football coach and player. He was the head coach of the Carolina Panthers, Denver Broncos and Chicago Bears of the National Football League (NFL). He coached the Panthers to a NFC Championship and the Broncos to an AFC Championship.

List of Atlanta Falcons head coaches

The Atlanta Falcons are an American football team based in Atlanta, Georgia. They are members of the South division of the National Football Conference (NFC) in the National Football League (NFL). The Falcons joined the NFL as an expansion team in 1966 and have compiled an all-time record of 337 wins, 436 loses, and 6 ties. The team has won the NFC West championship twice in 1980 and 1998 and the NFC South championship 4 times in 2004, 2010, 2012 and 2016. The Falcons have appeared in two Super Bowls, losing both times; their first appearance was in Super Bowl XXXIII, with the Falcons falling to the Denver Broncos 19–34, and the second was in Super Bowl LI, where the Falcons fell to the New England Patriots 28–34 in overtime. There have been 16 head coaches for the Falcons franchise, 12 serving full-time. Current head coach Dan Quinn holds the best winning percentage at .604 in the regular season, while Mike Smith has won the most games and was the longest tenured head coach, with a 66–46 regular season record. Under Smith's leadership, the team attained consecutive winning seasons (11–5 in 2008 and 9–7 in 2009), consecutive playoff appearances (2010 and 2011), and consecutive seasons with 10 wins or more (also in 2010 and 2011) for the first time in franchise history. Also, Smith is the only Falcons coach to win 2 divisional titles (NFC South, 2010 and 2012).

List of Atlanta Falcons seasons

This article is a list of seasons completed by the Atlanta Falcons American football franchise of the National Football League (NFL). The list documents the season-by-season records of the Falcons' franchise from 1966 to present, including postseason records, and league awards for individual players or head coaches.

The Falcons did not record consecutive winning seasons until 2009, when the team won their final three games of the regular season and finished with a 9–7 record after winning their season finale against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. Atlanta has since added its first stretch of five straight winning seasons, with a 13–3 record in 2010, a 10–6 record in 2011, and a 13–3 record in 2012. The streak ended with a 4–12 record in 2013.

List of Carolina Panthers seasons

The Carolina Panthers are a professional American football team based in Charlotte, North Carolina. The team was founded in 1993, when, along with the Jacksonville Jaguars, they were accepted into the National Football League (NFL) as an expansion team. The Panthers are owned by David Tepper.

The Carolina Panthers began play in 1995, and spent their first 7 seasons in the NFC West division, making it to the NFC Championship game in 1996, which was only their 2nd year as a football franchise.

In 2002, the Panthers were moved to the NFC South after the NFL realigned their divisions due to the Houston Texans joining the league as an expansion team. Over their 20 seasons in the NFL, the Panthers have played in over 300 games, winning 6 division titles (one in the NFC West and five in the NFC South) and reaching the NFL playoffs 8 times. The Panthers have never had back-to-back winning seasons, but recorded their first back-to-back-to-back playoff seasons in 2013 and 2014, becoming the first team in the history of the NFC South to win consecutive division titles in the process. They won a third consecutive division title in 2015, finishing with a league-best 15–1 record and securing homefield advantage in the playoffs for the first time in team history.

The team's worst regular season record was 2001, where they finished 1–15, worst in the league for that season; although they won their first game, they lost each of the remaining 15. Their best regular season record was accomplished in 2015, when they finished 15–1. The team has reached the Super Bowl twice; in 2003, when they lost Super Bowl XXXVIII 29–32 to the New England Patriots, and 2015, when they lost Super Bowl 50 10–24 to the Denver Broncos. Overall, the team has recorded 7 winning seasons, 12 losing seasons, and three 8–8 seasons; they have reached the playoffs 8 times. Including the playoffs, they have an overall record of 192 wins, 191 losses, and 1 tie (.501 winning percentage).

List of New Orleans Saints seasons

This article is a list of seasons completed by the New Orleans Saints American football franchise of the National Football League (NFL). The list documents the season-by-season records of the Saints' franchise from 1967 to present, including postseason records, and league awards for individual players or head coach.

List of Tampa Bay Buccaneers seasons

For complete team history, see History of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers

This is a list of seasons completed by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, an American football franchise based in Tampa, Florida. The Buccaneers are members of the South division in the National Football Conference (NFC) of the National Football League (NFL). The list documents the season-by-season records of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers' franchise from 1976 to present, including postseason records, and league awards for individual players or head coaches.

The Buccaneers first joined the NFL in 1976 as members of the AFC West. The following year, they moved to the NFC Central. The Tampa Bay expansion franchise was originally awarded to Tom McCloskey, a construction company owner from Philadelphia. It soon became apparent that McCloskey had financial problems, so the NFL found a replacement in Hugh Culverhouse. They were purchased by Malcolm Glazer in 1995 for $192 million, following Culverhouse's death. The front office staff of the team includes Bryan Glazer, Edward Glazer, and Joel Glazer.

The Buccaneers' only Super Bowl championship was won in Super Bowl XXXVII, at the conclusion of the 2002 season. This was the teams' only Super Bowl appearance, having reached the NFC conference championship on two other occasions. The Buccaneers have been divisional champions six times, three of them in the NFC Central and the other three in NFC South. They were the first team to win the NFC South after the NFL restructure in 2002. In their 42-year history, the Buccaneers have played over 500 regular and post-season games and have appeared in the post-season ten times.

List of all-time NFL win–loss records

The following is a list of win–loss records for each of the 32 active National Football League (NFL) teams.

Mike Smith (American football coach)

Mike Smith (born June 13, 1959) is a former American football coach. He most recently served as the defensive coordinator for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers of the National Football League (NFL) from 2016 to 2018. He is the former head coach of the NFL's Atlanta Falcons, a position he held from 2008 to 2014. He previously served as the defensive coordinator for the Jacksonville Jaguars between 2003 and 2007. During his tenure as the head coach of the Falcons, Smith became the franchise's winningest coach by number of wins in addition to being the recipient of the 2008 NFL Coach of the Year Award by the Associated Press and was also voted NFL Coach of the Year Award by the Sporting News three different times 2008, 2010 and 2012

NFC North

The National Football Conference – Northern Division or NFC North is one of the four divisions of the National Football Conference (NFC) in the National Football League (NFL). Nicknamed the "Black & Blue Division" for the rough and tough rivalry games between the teams, it currently has four members: the Chicago Bears, Detroit Lions, Green Bay Packers, and Minnesota Vikings. The NFC North was previously known as the NFC Central from 1970 to 2001. The Tampa Bay Buccaneers were previously members, from 1977, one year after they joined the league as an expansion team, until 2001 when they moved to the NFC South.

The division was created in 1967 as the Central Division of the NFL's Western Conference and existed for three seasons before the AFL–NFL merger. After the merger, it was renamed the NFC Central and retained that name until the NFL split into eight divisions in 2002. The four current division teams have been together in the same division or conference since the Vikings joined the league in 1961. The Bears, Lions and Packers have been in the same division or conference since the NFL began a conference format in 1933. Largely because the four teams have played each other at least twice a year, with the exception of the strike-shortened 1982 season, for more than half a century (more than 80 years in the case of the Bears, Lions and Packers), the entire division is considered one very large rivalry.

Based on the combined ages of its current teams, the NFC North is the oldest division in the NFL, at a combined 344 years old. The Bears are 99 years old (founded in 1919 in Decatur, Illinois; moved to Chicago in 1921), the Packers are also 99 years old (founded in 1919, but turned professional in 1921), the Lions are 89 years old (founded 1929 in Portsmouth, Ohio; moved to Detroit in 1934), and the Vikings are 57 years old (founded 1961). The division has a total of 11 Super Bowl appearances. The Packers have the most appearances in the Super Bowl with 5, the most recent happening at the conclusion of the 2010 season. The Bears and the Packers have the only Super Bowl wins of this division, a total of 5 (4 for the Packers and 1 for the Bears). Of the top 10 NFL teams with the highest winning percentage throughout its franchise history, three of them are in the NFC North (the Bears, the Packers, and the Vikings). The Lions however, have one of the lowest winning percentages in the NFL, including the first winless 16-game season in NFL history, in 2008.Entering 2018 the Bears led the division with an overall record of 752–581–42, victory in Super Bowl XX and eight pre-Super Bowl league titles; Chicago's overall playoff record is 17–18. The Packers hold an overall record of 740–564–38 with an overall playoff record of 34–22, four Super Bowl titles in five Super Bowl appearances, and nine pre-Super Bowl league titles - bringing the Packers to a total of 13 World Championships, currently the most in the NFL. The Lions hold a record of 555–651–32, four league championships, and a 7–13 playoff record. As the youngest (in terms of franchise age) team in the division, the Vikings hold a record of 473–392–11, a playoff record of 20-29, and had won a league title the season before the merger (although they subsequently lost Super Bowl IV).

This division earned the moniker "Black and Blue Division" due to its intense rivalries and physical style of play, and this nickname is still used regularly today. It is also known as the "Frostbite Division" as all teams played home games in late season winter cold until the mid-1970s. The division is also humorously called the "Frozen North", although Detroit has played its home games indoors since 1975, and Minnesota also did so from 1982 to 2013 and returned to indoor home games at U.S. Bank Stadium in 2016. ESPN sportscaster Chris Berman often refers to this division as the "NFC Norris" because of its geographical similarity to the National Hockey League's former Norris Division.

NFC West

The National Football Conference – Western Division or NFC West is one of the four divisions of the National Football Conference (NFC) in the National Football League (NFL). It currently has four members: the Arizona Cardinals, the Los Angeles Rams, the San Francisco 49ers, and the Seattle Seahawks.

The division was formed in 1967 as the National Football League Coastal Division, keeping with the theme of having all of the league's divisions starting with the letter "C." The division was so named because its teams were fairly close to the coasts of the United States, although they were on opposite coasts, making for long travel between division rivals. The NFL Coastal Division had four members: Atlanta Falcons, Baltimore Colts, Los Angeles Rams, and San Francisco 49ers. Los Angeles and San Francisco occupied the West Coast, while Baltimore and Atlanta occupied the East Coast.

After the AFL–NFL merger in 1970, the division was renamed the NFC West. The Baltimore Colts moved to the AFC East and were replaced by the New Orleans Saints. In 1976, the newly formed Seattle Seahawks spent one season in this division before moving to the AFC West. Except for that one year, the division remained the same until 1995 with the addition of the new Carolina Panthers team. The Rams moved to St. Louis before that same season, making the division geographically inaccurate. Ten of the fifteen NFC teams were based west of Atlanta, and twelve of them were based west of Charlotte.

The 2002 re-alignment changed the entire look of the NFC West. The Falcons, Panthers, and Saints moved into the NFC South; while the Cardinals moved in from the NFC East and the Seahawks returned from the AFC West. The Rams remained in the West, preserving the historical rivalry with the 49ers that has existed since 1950, and thus had been the only team in the division that was located east of the Rocky Mountains until 2015. With the Rams' return to Los Angeles in 2016, the entire NFC West is now located west of the Rockies for the first time in its history.

In 2010, the NFC West became the first division in NFL history to have a champion with a losing record, after the 2010 Seattle Seahawks won the division title with a record of 7–9. They were joined in this distinction in 2014 by the Carolina Panthers, who won the NFC South with a record of 7–8–1.

Since the end of the 2016 NFL regular season, the 49ers lead the division with a record of 560–464–16 (107–132–1 since re-alignment) with five Super Bowl titles and an overall playoff record of 31–21. The Rams hold a record of 544–554–21 (87–152–1 since re-alignment) with three Super Bowl appearances and one win to go with a 19–24 overall playoffs record. The Cardinals hold a 111–128-1 record since joining the NFC West (542–732–40 overall) and a loss in Super Bowl XLIII, currently with a 7–9 playoff record, 5-4 as a member of the NFC West. The Seahawks hold a record of 137–102-1 since joining the NFC West (325–318-1 overall), with three Super Bowl appearances, winning Super Bowl XLVIII to go with a playoff record of 16–14; they are currently 13–9 in the playoffs as a member of the NFC West, having gone 3–5 while in the AFC West. Since re-alignment, the Seahawks have led the division in wins, division titles, and playoff appearances.

Ron Rivera

Ronald Eugene "Ron" Rivera (born January 7, 1962) also known as "Riverboat Ron" is an American football coach and former player who is the head coach of the Carolina Panthers of the National Football League (NFL). He has also been the defensive coordinator for the Chicago Bears and San Diego Chargers.

Rivera played college football at the University of California in Berkeley, and was recognized as an All-American linebacker. He was selected in the second round of the 1984 NFL draft by the Chicago Bears, and was a backup on the 1985 team which won Super Bowl XX.

As a coach, Rivera was the defensive coordinator for Bears in the 2006, who were NFC champions and competed in Super Bowl XLI. In 2011, he was named head coach of the Panthers. Rivera was recognized as the NFL Coach of the Year by the Associated Press in 2013 and in 2015. Since taking over the Panthers, he has led the team to three straight divisional titles, and an appearance in Super Bowl 50.

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