NFC North

The National Football Conference – Northern Division or NFC North is one of the four divisions of the National Football Conference (NFC) in the National Football League (NFL). Nicknamed the "Black & Blue Division" for the rough and tough rivalry games between the teams, it currently has four members: the Chicago Bears, Detroit Lions, Green Bay Packers, and Minnesota Vikings. The NFC North was previously known as the NFC Central from 1970 to 2001. The Tampa Bay Buccaneers were previously members, from 1977, one year after they joined the league as an expansion team, until 2001 when they moved to the NFC South.

The division was created in 1967 as the Central Division of the NFL's Western Conference and existed for three seasons before the AFL–NFL merger. After the merger, it was renamed the NFC Central and retained that name until the NFL split into eight divisions in 2002. The four current division teams have been together in the same division or conference since the Vikings joined the league in 1961. The Bears, Lions and Packers have been in the same division or conference since the NFL began a conference format in 1933. Largely because the four teams have played each other at least twice a year, with the exception of the strike-shortened 1982 season, for more than half a century (more than 80 years in the case of the Bears, Lions and Packers), the entire division is considered one very large rivalry.

Based on the combined ages of its current teams, the NFC North is the oldest division in the NFL, at a combined 344 years old. The Bears are 99 years old (founded in 1919 in Decatur, Illinois; moved to Chicago in 1921), the Packers are also 99 years old (founded in 1919, but turned professional in 1921), the Lions are 89 years old (founded 1929 in Portsmouth, Ohio; moved to Detroit in 1934), and the Vikings are 57 years old (founded 1961). The division has a total of 11 Super Bowl appearances. The Packers have the most appearances in the Super Bowl with 5, the most recent happening at the conclusion of the 2010 season. The Bears and the Packers have the only Super Bowl wins of this division, a total of 5 (4 for the Packers and 1 for the Bears). Of the top 10 NFL teams with the highest winning percentage throughout its franchise history, three of them are in the NFC North (the Bears, the Packers, and the Vikings). The Lions however, have one of the lowest winning percentages in the NFL, including the first winless 16-game season in NFL history, in 2008.[1]

Entering 2018 the Bears led the division with an overall record of 752–581–42, victory in Super Bowl XX[2] and eight pre-Super Bowl league titles; Chicago's overall playoff record is 17–18. The Packers hold an overall record of 740–564–38 with an overall playoff record of 34–22, four Super Bowl titles in five Super Bowl appearances, and nine pre-Super Bowl league titles - bringing the Packers to a total of 13 World Championships, currently the most in the NFL. The Lions hold a record of 555–651–32, four league championships, and a 7–13 playoff record. As the youngest (in terms of franchise age) team in the division, the Vikings hold a record of 473–392–11, a playoff record of 20-29, and had won a league title the season before the merger (although they subsequently lost Super Bowl IV).

This division earned the moniker "Black and Blue Division" due to its intense rivalries and physical style of play, and this nickname is still used regularly today. It is also known as the "Frostbite Division" as all teams played home games in late season winter cold until the mid-1970s. The division is also humorously called the "Frozen North", although Detroit has played its home games indoors since 1975, and Minnesota also did so from 1982 to 2013 and returned to indoor home games at U.S. Bank Stadium in 2016. ESPN sportscaster Chris Berman often refers to this division as the "NFC Norris" because of its geographical similarity to the National Hockey League's former Norris Division.

NFC North
ConferenceNational Football Conference
LeagueNational Football League
SportAmerican football
Founded1967 (As NFL Western Conference Central Division)
CountryUnited States
Teams
No. of teams4
Championships
Most recent NFC North champion(s)Chicago Bears (11 titles)
Most NFC North titlesMinnesota Vikings (20 titles)

Division lineups

Place cursor over year for division champ or Super Bowl team.

Years
NFL Western Conference
Central Division
NFC Central Division[B]
1900s 2000s
67[A] 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 00 01
Chicago Bears
Detroit Lions
Green Bay Packers
Minnesota Vikings
  Tampa Bay Buccaneers[C]
NFC North Division[D]
2000s
02[D] 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21
Chicago Bears
Detroit Lions
Green Bay Packers
Minnesota Vikings
     Team not in division      Division Won Super Bowl      Division Won NFC Championship      Division won NFL Championship, Lost Super Bowl
A The NFL Western Conference was divided into the Coastal and Central divisions. The Packers had won Super Bowl I in 1966 in the NFL Western Conference.
B Starting in the 1970 season, the division became the National Football Conference - Central Division (or NFC Central for short), after the AFL–NFL merger.
C Tampa Bay moved from the AFC West in 1977
D For the 2002 season, the league realigned to have 8 four team divisions. Division adopts current name. Tampa Bay moves to the NFC South.

Division champions

Season Team Record Playoff Results
NFL Central (pre-merger)
1967 Green Bay Packers 9–4–1 Won Conference Playoffs (Rams) 28–7
Won NFL Championship (Cowboys) 21–17
Won Super Bowl II (vs. Raiders) 33–14
1968 Minnesota Vikings 8–6 Lost Conference Playoffs (at Colts) 14–24
1969 Minnesota Vikings 12–2 Won Conference Playoffs (Rams) 23–20
Won NFL Championship (Browns) 27–7
Lost Super Bowl IV (vs. Chiefs) 7–23
NFC Central (post merger)
1970 Minnesota Vikings 12–2 Lost Divisional Playoffs (49ers) 14–17
1971 Minnesota Vikings 11–3 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Cowboys) 12–20
1972 Green Bay Packers 10–4 Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Redskins) 3–16
1973 Minnesota Vikings 12–2 Won Divisional Playoffs (Redskins) 27–20
Won NFC Championship (at Cowboys) 27–10
Lost Super Bowl VIII (vs. Dolphins) 7–24
1974 Minnesota Vikings 10–4 Won Divisional Playoffs (Cardinals) 30–14
Won NFC Championship (Rams) 14–10
Lost Super Bowl IX (vs. Steelers) 6–16
1975 Minnesota Vikings 12–2 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Cowboys) 14–17
1976 Minnesota Vikings 11–2–1 Won Divisional Playoffs (Redskins) 35–20
Won NFC Championship (Rams) 24–13
Lost Super Bowl XI (vs. Raiders) 14–32
1977 Minnesota Vikings 9–5 Won Divisional Playoffs (at Rams) 14–7
Lost NFC Championship (at Cowboys) 6–23
1978 Minnesota Vikings 8–7–1 Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Rams) 10–34
1979 Tampa Bay Buccaneers 10–6 Won Divisional Playoffs (Eagles) 24–17
Lost NFC Championship (Rams) 0–9
1980 Minnesota Vikings 9–7 Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Eagles) 16–31
1981 Tampa Bay Buccaneers 9–7 Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Cowboys) 0–38
1982+ Green Bay Packers 5–3–1 Won First Round Playoffs (Cardinals) 41–16
Lost Second Round Playoffs (at Cowboys) 26–37
1983 Detroit Lions 9–7 Lost Divisional Playoffs (at 49ers) 23–24
1984 Chicago Bears 10–6 Won Divisional Playoffs (at Redskins) 23–19
Lost NFC Championship (at 49ers) 0–23
1985 Chicago Bears 15–1 Won Divisional Playoffs (Giants) 21–0
Won NFC Championship (Rams) 24–0
Won Super Bowl XX (vs. Patriots) 46–10
1986 Chicago Bears 14–2 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Redskins) 13–27
1987 Chicago Bears 11–4 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Redskins) 17–21
1988 Chicago Bears 12–4 Won Divisional Playoffs (Eagles) 20–12
Lost NFC Championship (49ers) 3–28
1989 Minnesota Vikings 10–6 Lost Divisional Playoffs (at 49ers) 13–41
1990 Chicago Bears 11–5 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Saints) 16–6
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Giants) 3–31
1991 Detroit Lions 12–4 Won Divisional Playoffs (Cowboys) 38–6
Lost NFC Championship (at Redskins) 10–41
1992 Minnesota Vikings 11–5 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Redskins) 7–24
1993 Detroit Lions 10–6 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Packers) 24–28
1994 Minnesota Vikings 10–6 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Bears) 18–35
1995 Green Bay Packers 11–5 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Falcons) 37–20
Won Divisional Playoffs (at 49ers) 27–17
Lost NFC Championship (at Cowboys) 27–38
1996 Green Bay Packers 13–3 Won Divisional Playoffs (49ers) 35–14
Won NFC Championship (Panthers) 30–13
Won Super Bowl XXXI (vs. Patriots) 35–21
1997 Green Bay Packers 13–3 Won Divisional Playoffs (Buccaneers) 21–7
Won NFC Championship (at 49ers) 23–10
Lost Super Bowl XXXII (vs. Broncos) 24–31
1998 Minnesota Vikings 15–1 Won Divisional Playoffs (Cardinals) 41–21
Lost NFC Championship (Falcons) 27–30 (OT)
1999 Tampa Bay Buccaneers 11–5 Lost NFC Championship Game
2000 Minnesota Vikings 11–5 Won Divisional Playoffs (Saints) 34–16
Lost NFC Championship (at Giants) 0–41
2001 Chicago Bears 13–3 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Eagles) 19–33
NFC North
2002 Green Bay Packers 12–4 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Falcons) 7–27
2003 Green Bay Packers 10–6 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Seahawks) 33–27 (OT)
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Eagles) 17–20 (OT)
2004 Green Bay Packers 10–6 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Vikings) 17–31
2005 Chicago Bears 11–5 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Panthers) 21–29
2006 Chicago Bears 13–3 Won Divisional Playoffs (Seahawks) 27–24 (OT)
Won NFC Championship (Saints) 39–14
Lost Super Bowl XLI (vs. Colts) 17–29
2007 Green Bay Packers 13–3 Lost NFC Championship Game
2008 Minnesota Vikings 10–6 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Eagles) 14–26
2009 Minnesota Vikings 12–4 Won Divisional Playoffs (Cowboys) 34–3
Lost NFC Championship (at Saints) 28–31 (OT)
2010 Chicago Bears 11–5 Won Divisional Playoffs (Seahawks) 35–24
Lost NFC Championship (Packers) 14–21
2011 Green Bay Packers 15–1 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Giants) 20–37
2012 Green Bay Packers 11–5 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Vikings) 24–10
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at 49ers) 31–45
2013 Green Bay Packers 8–7–1 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (49ers) 20–23
2014 Green Bay Packers 12–4 Won Divisional Playoffs (Cowboys) 26–21
Lost NFC Championship (at Seahawks) 22–28 (OT)
2015 Minnesota Vikings 11–5 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Seahawks) 9–10
2016 Green Bay Packers 10–6 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Giants) 38–13
Won Divisional Playoffs (at Cowboys) 34–31
Lost NFC Championship (at Falcons) 21–44
2017 Minnesota Vikings 13–3 Won Divisional Playoffs (Saints) 29–24
Lost NFC Championship (at Eagles) 7–38
2018 Chicago Bears 12–4 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Eagles) 15–16

+ A players' strike in 1982 reduced the regular season to nine games, so the league used a special 16-team playoff tournament just for this year. Division standings were ignored; Green Bay had the best record of the division teams.

Wild Card qualifiers

Season Team Record Playoff Results
NFC Central
1970 Detroit Lions 10–4 Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Cowboys) 0–5
1977 Chicago Bears 9–5 Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Cowboys) 7–37
1979 Chicago Bears 10–6 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Eagles) 17–27
1982+ Minnesota Vikings 5–4 Won First Round Playoffs (Falcons) 30–24
Lost Second Round Playoffs (at Redskins) 7–21
Tampa Bay Buccaneers 5–4 Lost First Round Playoffs (at Cowboys) 17–30
Detroit Lions 4–5 Lost First Round Playoffs (at Redskins) 7–31
1987 Minnesota Vikings 8–7 Won Wild Card Playoffs (at Saints) 44–10
Won Divisional Playoffs (at 49ers) 36–24
Lost NFC Championship (at Redskins) 10–17
1988 Minnesota Vikings 11–5 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Rams) 28–17
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at 49ers) 9–34
1991 Chicago Bears 11–5 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Cowboys) 13–17
1993 Minnesota Vikings 9–7 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Giants) 10–17
Green Bay Packers 9–7 Won Wild Card Playoffs (at Lions) 28–24
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Cowboys) 17–27
1994 Green Bay Packers 9–7 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Lions) 16–12
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Cowboys) 9–35
Detroit Lions 9–7 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Packers) 12–16
Chicago Bears 9–7 Won Wild Card Playoffs (at Vikings) 35–18
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at 49ers) 15–44
1995 Detroit Lions 10–6 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Eagles) 37–58
1996 Minnesota Vikings 9–7 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Cowboys) 15–40
1997 Tampa Bay Buccaneers 10–6 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Lions) 20–10
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Packers) 7–21
Detroit Lions 9–7 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Buccaneers) 10–20
Minnesota Vikings 9–7 Won Wild Card Playoffs (at Giants) 23–22
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at 49ers) 22–38
1998 Green Bay Packers 11–5 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at 49ers) 27–30
1999 Minnesota Vikings 10–6 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Cowboys) 27–10
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Rams) 37–49
Detroit Lions 8–8 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Cowboys) 27–10
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Rams) 37–49
2000 Tampa Bay Buccaneers 10–6 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Eagles) 3–21
2001 Green Bay Packers 12–4 Won Wild Card Playoffs (49ers) 25–15
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Rams) 17–45
Tampa Bay Buccaneers 9–7 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Eagles) 9–31
NFC North
2004 Minnesota Vikings 8–8 Won Wild Card Playoffs (at Packers) 31–17
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Eagles) 14–27
2009 Green Bay Packers 11–5 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Cardinals) 45–51 (OT)
2010 Green Bay Packers 10–6 Won Wild Card Playoffs (at Eagles) 21–16
Won Divisional Playoffs (at Falcons) 48–21
Won NFC Championship (at Bears) 21–14
Won Super Bowl XLV (vs. Steelers) 31–25
2011 Detroit Lions 10–6 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Saints) 28–45
2012 Minnesota Vikings 10–6 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Packers) 10–24
2014 Detroit Lions 11–5 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Cowboys) 20–24
2015 Green Bay Packers 10–6 Won Wild Card Playoffs (at Redskins) 35–18
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Cardinals) 26–20 (OT)
2016 Detroit Lions 9–7 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Seahawks) 6–26

+ A players' strike in 1982 reduced the regular season to nine games, so the league used a special 16-team playoff tournament just for this year.

Total playoff berths

Total playoff berths as members of the NFC Central/North

(1966–2018 seasons)

Team Division
Championships
Playoff
Berths
NFL League
Titles
Super Bowl
Appearances
Super Bowl
Wins
Minnesota Vikings 20 29 1 4 0
Green Bay Packers 15 22 13 5 4
Chicago Bears 11 15 9 2 1
Detroit Lions 3 12 4 0 0

To sort table above, click button to right of heading.

Total playoff berths in team history

(1920–2018 seasons)

Team Division
Championships
Playoff
Berths
NFL League
Titles
(pre-merger)
Conference
Wins
Super Bowl
Wins
Total (1)
Championships
Chicago Bears 21 26 8 4 1 9
Minnesota Vikings 20 29 1 4 0 0
Green Bay Packers 18 31 11 9 4 13
Detroit Lions 4 18 4 4 0 4

To sort table above, click button to right of heading.

1 From 1966 to 1969, this means winning both the NFL Championship game AND the Super Bowl. Hence, the Vikings' NFL Championship victory in 1969 isn't counted. The Packers had 2 NFL titles during this time frame and also won Super Bowl I and II.

Season results

(#) Denotes team that won the Super Bowl
(#) Denotes team that won the NFC Championship
(#) Denotes team that won the NFL Championship
(#) Denotes team that qualified for the NFL Playoffs
Season Team (record)
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th
NFL Central (pre-merger)
1967 Green Bay (9–4–1) Chicago (7–6–1) Detroit (5–7–2) Minnesota (3–8–3)
1968 Minnesota (8–6) Chicago (7–7) Green Bay (6–7–1) Detroit (4–8–2)
1969 Minnesota (12–2) Detroit (9–4–1) Green Bay (8–6) Chicago (1–13)
NFC Central (post merger)
1970 Minnesota (12–2) Detroit (10–4) Green Bay (6–8) Chicago (6–8)
1971 Minnesota (11–3) Detroit (7–6–1) Chicago (6–8) Green Bay (4–8–2)
1972 Green Bay (10–4) Detroit (8–5–1) Minnesota (7–7) Chicago (4–9–1)
1973 Minnesota (12–2) Detroit (6–7–1) Green Bay (5–7–2) Chicago (3–11)
1974 Minnesota (10–4) Detroit (7–7) Green Bay (6–8) Chicago (4–10)
1975 (1) Minnesota (12–2) Detroit (7–7) Chicago (4–10) Green Bay (4–10)
1976 (1) Minnesota (11–2–1) Chicago (7–7) Detroit (6–8) Green Bay (5–9)
1977 (3) Minnesota (9–5) (4) Chicago (9–5) Detroit (6–8) Green Bay (4–10) Tampa Bay (2–12)
1978 (3) Minnesota (8–7–1) Green Bay (8–7–1) Detroit (7–9) Chicago (7–9) Tampa Bay (5–11)
1979 (2) Tampa Bay (10–6) (5) Chicago (10–6) Minnesota (7–9) Green Bay (5–11) Detroit (2–14)
1980 (3) Minnesota (9–7) Detroit (9–7) Chicago (7–9) Tampa Bay (5–10–1) Green Bay (5–10–1)
1981 (3) Tampa Bay (9–7) Detroit (8–8) Green Bay (8–8) Minnesota (7–9) Chicago (6–10)
1982^ (3) Green Bay (5–3–1) (4) Minnesota (5–4) (7) Tampa Bay (5–4) (8) Detroit (4–5) Chicago (3–6)
1983 (3) Detroit (9–7) Green Bay (8–8) Chicago (8–8) Minnesota (8–8) Tampa Bay (2–14)
1984 (3) Chicago (10–6) Green Bay (8–8) Tampa Bay (6–10) Detroit (4–11–1) Minnesota (3–13)
1985 (1) Chicago (15–1) Green Bay (8–8) Minnesota (7–9) Detroit (7–9) Tampa Bay (2–14)
1986 (2) Chicago (14–2) Minnesota (9–7) Detroit (5–11) Green Bay (4–12) Tampa Bay (2–14)
1987 (2) Chicago (11–4) (5) Minnesota (8–7) Green Bay (5–9–1) Tampa Bay (4–11) Detroit (4–11)
1988 (1) Chicago (12–4) (4) Minnesota (11–5) Tampa Bay (5–11) Detroit (4–12) Green Bay (4–12)
1989 (3) Minnesota (10–6) Green Bay (10–6) Detroit (7–9) Chicago (6–10) Tampa Bay (5–11)
1990 (3) Chicago (11–5) Tampa Bay (6–10) Detroit (6–10) Green Bay (6–10) Minnesota (6–10)
1991 (2) Detroit (12–4) (4) Chicago (11–5) Minnesota (8–8) Green Bay (4–12) Tampa Bay (3–13)
1992 (3) Minnesota (11–5) Green Bay (9–7) Tampa Bay (5–11) Chicago (5–11) Detroit (5–11)
1993 (3) Detroit (10–6) (5) Minnesota (9–7) (6) Green Bay (9–7) Chicago (7–9) Tampa Bay (5–11)
1994 (3) Minnesota (10–6) (4) Green Bay (9–7) (5) Detroit (9–7) (6) Chicago (9–7) Tampa Bay (6–10)
1995 (3) Green Bay (11–5) (5) Detroit (10–6) Chicago (9–7) Minnesota (8–8) Tampa Bay (7–9)
1996 (1) Green Bay (13–3) (6) Minnesota (9–7) Chicago (7–9) Tampa Bay (6–10) Detroit (5–11)
1997 (2) Green Bay (13–3) (4) Tampa Bay (10–6) (5) Detroit (9–7) (6) Minnesota (9–7) Chicago (4–12)
1998 (1) Minnesota (15–1) (5) Green Bay (11–5) Tampa Bay (8–8) Detroit (5–11) Chicago (4–12)
1999 (2) Tampa Bay (11–5) (4) Minnesota (10–6) (6) Detroit (8–8) Green Bay (8–8) Chicago (6–10)
2000 (2) Minnesota (11–5) (5) Tampa Bay (10–6) Green Bay (9–7) Detroit (9–7) Chicago (5–11)
2001 (2) Chicago (13–3) (4) Green Bay (12–4) (6) Tampa Bay (9–7) Minnesota (5–11) Detroit (2–14)
Season Team (record)
1st 2nd 3rd 4th
NFC North
2002 (3) Green Bay (12–4) Minnesota (6–10) Chicago (4–12) Detroit (3–13)
2003 (4) Green Bay (10–6) Minnesota (9–7) Chicago (7–9) Detroit (5–11)
2004 (3) Green Bay (10–6) (6) Minnesota (8–8) Detroit (6–10) Chicago (5–11)
2005 (2) Chicago (11–5) Minnesota (9–7) Detroit (5–11) Green Bay (4–12)
2006 (1) Chicago (13–3) Green Bay (8–8) Minnesota (6–10) Detroit (3–13)
2007 (2) Green Bay (13–3) Minnesota (8–8) Detroit (7–9) Chicago (7–9)
2008 (3) Minnesota (10–6) Chicago (9–7) Green Bay (6–10) Detroit (0–16)
2009 (2) Minnesota (12–4) (5) Green Bay (11–5) Chicago (7–9) Detroit (2–14)
2010 (2) Chicago (11–5) (6) Green Bay (10–6) Detroit (6–10) Minnesota (6–10)
2011 (1) Green Bay (15–1) (6) Detroit (10–6) Chicago (8–8) Minnesota (3–13)
2012 (3) Green Bay (11–5) (6) Minnesota (10–6) Chicago (10–6) Detroit (4–12)
2013 (4) Green Bay (8–7–1) Chicago (8–8) Detroit (7–9) Minnesota (5–10–1)
2014 (2) Green Bay (12–4) (6) Detroit (11–5) Minnesota (7–9) Chicago (5–11)
2015 (3) Minnesota (11–5) (5) Green Bay (10–6) Detroit (7–9) Chicago (6–10)
2016 (4) Green Bay (10–6) (6) Detroit (9–7) Minnesota (8–8) Chicago (3–13)
2017 (2) Minnesota (13–3) Detroit (9–7) Green Bay (7–9) Chicago (5–11)
2018 (3) Chicago (12–4) Minnesota (8–7–1) Green Bay (6–9–1) Detroit (6–10)

Schedule assignments

Year Opponents
Interconf. Intraconf.
2018 AFC East NFC West
2019 AFC West NFC East
2020 AFC South NFC South
2021 AFC North NFC West
2022 AFC East NFC East
2023 AFC West NFC South
2024 AFC South NFC West
2025 AFC North NFC East
2026 AFC East NFC South
2027 AFC West NFC West
2028 AFC South NFC East

See also

References

  1. ^ "Lions complete 1st 0-16 season in league history - NFL- NBC Sports". Nbcsports.msnbc.com. December 28, 2008. Retrieved September 8, 2012.
  2. ^ "Super Bowl XX Game Recap". Nfl.com. January 27, 1986. Retrieved September 8, 2012.
2002 Green Bay Packers season

The 2002 Green Bay Packers season was their 84th season overall and their 82nd in the National Football League.

The Packers achieved a 12–4 record in the regular season, before losing in the 2003 NFL Wild Card playoffs round to Michael Vick's Atlanta Falcons at Lambeau Field. This marked the first time in NFL history that the Packers had lost at home in the playoffs.

2003 Green Bay Packers season

The 2003 Green Bay Packers season was the franchise's 85th season overall and their 83rd in the National Football League.

This season finished with an overtime loss to the Philadelphia Eagles in the divisional round of the 2004 playoffs, after the Packers defeated the Seattle Seahawks in the Wild Card round in overtime off an interception return for a touchdown by Al Harris.

The season may be most notable for Brett Favre's Monday night performance against the Oakland Raiders the night after his father had died.

The Packers won the division on the last play of the season. Needing a win and a Minnesota Vikings loss to clinch the division, the Packers routed the Denver Broncos 31-3, while the Vikings lost 18-17 on a last second touchdown by the 3-12 Arizona Cardinals.

2004 Green Bay Packers season

The 2004 Green Bay Packers season was the franchise's 86th season overall and their 84th in the National Football League.

The season started with the Packers on a losing streak of four of their first five games, then winning their next six games, and finally ending in a Wild Card playoff loss to the Minnesota Vikings. They finished with an overall record of 10–6. This was the second time the Packers had lost a playoff game at Lambeau.

2008 Minnesota Vikings season

The 2008 season was the Minnesota Vikings' 48th in the NFL and their third under head coach Brad Childress. They won their 17th NFC North title with a 10–6 record, the first time since 2000 that they made the playoffs and finished with a winning record, but had to play in the wild card round of the playoffs, where they were paired with Childress's former team, the Philadelphia Eagles, who ended the Vikings' season with a 26–14 win. Second-year running back Adrian Peterson led the league in rushing with 1,760 yards.

2010 Chicago Bears season

The 2010 Chicago Bears season was the franchise's 91st season overall in the National Football League. Coming off a disappointing 7–9 record in the 2009 season and failing to qualify for the NFL playoffs for a third consecutive season, the Bears sought to develop their roster and improve on their record in 2010, particularly their standing in the NFC North. All Bears home games were scheduled to be played at Soldier Field. With their final regular season record at 11–5, the Bears improved drastically on their 2009 record. Their regular season finished with their first playoff appearance since the Super Bowl season of 2006, winning the NFC North division and earning a bye as the NFC's second seed. The Bears won their first game in the Divisional round of the playoffs, defeating the Seattle Seahawks on January 16, 2011, to advance to the NFC Championship game. The Chicago Bears's 2010 season came to an end January 23, 2011 with a 21–14 loss to their longtime rivals and eventual Super Bowl champion Green Bay Packers in the NFC Championship Game.

This was the last time the Bears won the NFC North and appeared in the postseason until 2018.

2012 Green Bay Packers season

The 2012 Green Bay Packers season was the franchise's 94th season overall and their 92nd in the National Football League, and the seventh under head coach Mike McCarthy. The Packers won the NFC North division title for the second year in a row with an 11–5 record. The Packers lost in the divisional round of the playoffs to the eventual NFC Champion San Francisco 49ers by the score of 45-31, finishing with a postseason record of 1-1.

The Packers offense finished the season fifth in points and eleventh in yards per game. The defense finished eleventh in points allowed and twenty-second in yards allowed per game.

2016 Green Bay Packers season

The 2016 Green Bay Packers season was their 98th season overall, 96th season in the National Football League, and the 11th under head coach Mike McCarthy. Despite a 4-6 start to the season, the Packers went on a 6-game winning streak to finish the regular season with a 10–6 record. The team clinched the NFC North for the fifth time in six years with their week 17 win over the Detroit Lions. They routed the fifth-seeded New York Giants 38–13 in the wild card round of the playoffs and upset the top-seeded Dallas Cowboys 34–31 in the divisional round of the playoffs, but their season came to an end when they were beat by the second-seeded Atlanta Falcons in the NFC Championship Game 44–21.

4th and 26

4th and 26 was an American football play that occurred on Sunday, January 11, 2004, during the National Football League (NFL)'s 2003–04 playoffs. The play occurred during the fourth quarter of a divisional playoff game between the visiting Green Bay Packers and the Philadelphia Eagles at Lincoln Financial Field in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

The NFC East champion and top-seeded Eagles were coming off an opening round bye while the fourth-seeded, NFC North champion Packers were the visiting team, coming off an overtime win over the Seattle Seahawks.

Chicago Bears

The Chicago Bears are a professional American football team based in Chicago, Illinois. The Bears compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's National Football Conference (NFC) North division. The Bears have won nine NFL Championships, including one Super Bowl, and hold the NFL record for the most enshrinees in the Pro Football Hall of Fame and the most retired jersey numbers. The Bears have also recorded more victories than any other NFL franchise.The franchise was founded in Decatur, Illinois, on September 17, 1920, and moved to Chicago in 1921. It is one of only two remaining franchises from the NFL's founding in 1920, along with the Arizona Cardinals, which was originally also in Chicago. The team played home games at Wrigley Field on Chicago's North Side through the 1970 season; they now play at Soldier Field on the Near South Side, next to Lake Michigan. The Bears have a long-standing rivalry with the Green Bay Packers.The team headquarters, Halas Hall, is in the Chicago suburb of Lake Forest, Illinois. The Bears practice at adjoining facilities there during the season. Since 2002, the Bears have held their annual training camp, from late July to mid-August, at Ward Field on the campus of Olivet Nazarene University in Bourbonnais, Illinois.

Detroit Lions

The Detroit Lions are a professional American football team based in Detroit, Michigan. The Lions compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's National Football Conference (NFC) North division. The team plays its home games at Ford Field in Downtown Detroit.

Originally based in Portsmouth, Ohio and called the Portsmouth Spartans, the team formally joined the NFL on July 12, 1930 and began play in the 1930 season. Despite success within the NFL, they could not survive in Portsmouth, then the NFL's smallest city. The team was purchased and relocated to Detroit for the 1934 season.

The Lions have won four NFL championships, tied for 9th overall in total championships among all 32 NFL franchises; however, their last was in 1957, which gives the club the second-longest NFL championship drought behind the Arizona Cardinals. They are one of four current teams and the only NFC team to have not yet played in the Super Bowl. They are also the only franchise to have been in operation for all 52 seasons of the Super Bowl era without having appeared in one (the Cleveland Browns were not in operation for the 1996 to 1998 seasons).

Green Bay Packers

The Green Bay Packers are a professional American football team based in Green Bay, Wisconsin. The Packers compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's National Football Conference (NFC) North division. It is the third-oldest franchise in the NFL, dating back to 1919, and is the only non-profit, community-owned major league professional sports team based in the United States. Home games have been played at Lambeau Field since 1957.

The Packers are the last of the "small town teams" which were common in the NFL during the league's early days of the 1920s and '30s. Founded in 1919 by Earl "Curly" Lambeau and George Whitney Calhoun, the franchise traces its lineage to other semi-professional teams in Green Bay dating back to 1896. Between 1919 and 1920, the Packers competed against other semi-pro clubs from around Wisconsin and the Midwest, before joining the American Professional Football Association (APFA), the forerunner of today's NFL, in 1921. Although Green Bay is by far the smallest major league professional sports market in North America, Forbes ranked the Packers as the world's 26th most valuable sports franchise in 2016, with a value of $2.35 billion.The Packers have won 13 league championships, the most in NFL history, with nine pre–Super Bowl NFL titles and four Super Bowl victories. The Packers won the first two Super Bowls in 1967 and 1968 and were the only NFL team to defeat the American Football League (AFL) prior to the AFL–NFL merger. The Vince Lombardi Trophy is named after the Packers' coach of the same name, who guided them to their first two Super Bowls. Their two subsequent Super Bowl wins came in 1996 and 2010.The Packers are long-standing adversaries of the Chicago Bears, Minnesota Vikings, and Detroit Lions, who today comprise the NFL's NFC North division, and were formerly members of the NFC Central Division. They have played over 100 games against each of those teams through history, and have a winning overall record against all of them, a distinction only shared with the Kansas City Chiefs and Dallas Cowboys. The Bears–Packers rivalry is one of the oldest in NFL history, dating back to 1921.

Jim Schwartz

James J. Schwartz (born June 2, 1966) is an American football coach who is the defensive coordinator of the Philadelphia Eagles of the National Football League (NFL). Schwartz was also formerly the head coach of the NFL's Detroit Lions.

As a defensive-minded coach that emphasized strong defensive line play, Schwartz was known to build his units around a dominant interior lineman. Each of his stints as head coach or defensive coordinator resulted in one of his defensive tackles being named to the Pro Bowl or All-Pro First Team, including Albert Haynesworth, Ndamukong Suh, Marcell Dareus and Fletcher Cox.

List of Chicago Bears seasons

The Chicago Bears franchise was founded as the Decatur Staleys, a charter member of the American Professional Football Association (APFA). The team moved to Chicago, Illinois, in 1921 and changed its name to the Bears in 1922, the same year the APFA changed its name to the National Football League (NFL). This list documents the franchise's completed seasons from 1920 to present, including postseason records and results from postseason games.The Chicago Bears have played over 1,000 games in their history, and have had eight NFL Championships victories and one Super Bowl win. The Bears' nine championships are the second most by any team in NFL history. The franchise has captured 18 NFL divisional titles and four NFL conference championships. The Bears have also recorded more regular season victories than any other NFL franchise.The franchise has experienced three major periods of continued success in their history. The first period of success came from 1932 to 1946 when the Bears won six NFL Championships. In this period the Bears participated in the first National Football League playoff game, the first NFL Championship Game, and become the American football sports dynasty of the 1940s. The Bears played in four straight NFL Championship Games between 1940 and 1943, winning three of them, including an NFL record 73–0 victory over the Washington Redskins in 1940. The second period of success was between 1984 and 1991 when the Bears captured six NFC Central Division titles in eight years and won Super Bowl XX. A brief period of success stretched from 2005 to 2007 when the franchise captured two straight NFC North titles and a NFC Championship title, which earned them a berth in Super Bowl XLI, a game that the club lost to the Indianapolis Colts.

Despite their historic championship record, the Bears have also experienced periods of failure in their history. The franchise finished in last place within its division five times in the 1970s. In 1971, the team moved from Wrigley Field to Soldier Field to play its home games. In the mid- to late 1990s and early 2000s, the club posted six seasons with 10 or more losses. By chance, these two decades—the 1970s and 1990s—are the only decades in the Bears history that the franchise has not won or played for an NFL Championship or Super Bowl. In the 1969 season, the franchise posted their worst regular season record with a 1–13 showing.

List of Detroit Lions seasons

The Detroit Lions are a professional American football team based in Detroit, Michigan. The Lions compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's National Football Conference (NFC) North division. The team plays its home games at Ford Field in Downtown Detroit. Originally based in Portsmouth, Ohio and called the Portsmouth Spartans, the team began play in 1928 as an independent professional team. The 2015 season was their 88th in the NFL.

The Lions have won four NFL championships, tied for 9th overall in total championships amongst all 32 NFL franchises; although the last was in 1957, which gives the club the second-longest NFL championship drought behind the Arizona Cardinals. The Lions were the first franchise to finish a full (non-strike shortened) regular season with no wins or ties since the move to sixteen season games in 1978, going 0–16 during the 2008 NFL season. They are also one of four current teams, and the only one in the NFC, to have never played in the Super Bowl.

List of Green Bay Packers seasons

The Green Bay Packers are a professional American football team based in Green Bay, Wisconsin. Since their founding in 1919 by Curly Lambeau and George Whitney Calhoun, the Packers have played over 1,350 games in 100 seasons of competitive football. The first two seasons the Packers played against local teams in and around Wisconsin. In 1921, they became part of the American Professional Football Association, the precursor to the National Football League (NFL). In their 99 seasons, the Packers have won 13 professional American football championships (the most in NFL history), including nine NFL Championships and four Super Bowls. They have captured 18 divisional titles, eight conference championships, and recorded the second most regular season (738) and overall victories (772) of any NFL franchise, behind the Chicago Bears.

The franchise has experienced three major periods of continued success in their history. The first period of success came from 1929–1944, when the Packers were named NFL Champions six times. This period saw the Packers become the first dynasty of American football (1929–1931). The second period of success was between 1960–1967, where the Packers won five NFL Championships and the first two Super Bowls. The Packers also won three consecutive NFL Championships for the second time in franchise history (1965–1967). The most recent period of success ranges from 1993–present, where the franchise has reached the playoffs 19 times, including three Super Bowl appearances, winning two in 1996 and 2010. This period included the 2011 season, where the team won 15 games, the most the Packers have won in a single season.

The Packers have also experienced periods of extended failure in their history. The two most notable times were from 1945–1958, where the franchise never placed higher than 3rd in the league standings and recorded the worst record of any Packers team, going 1–10–1 in 1958. The second period of continued failure occurred between 1968–1991, where the club only went to the playoffs twice, and recorded only six winning seasons.

The 2018 NFL season is the Packers 100th season of competitive football and 98th season as part of the NFL.

List of Minnesota Vikings seasons

The Minnesota Vikings are an American football team playing in the National Football League (NFL). The Vikings compete in the NFL as a member club of the league's National Football Conference (NFC) North division. The team was established in 1959, when three Minneapolis businessmen – Bill Boyer, H. P. Skoglund and Max Winter – were awarded a franchise in the new American Football League (AFL). In January 1960, the ownership group, along with Bernie Ridder, forfeited its AFL membership and was awarded the NFL's 14th franchise, with play to begin in 1961.Since the franchise's inception, the Vikings have completed 56 seasons of play in the NFL. The team won one NFL Championship in 1969, and was the last team crowned NFL champions before the AFL–NFL merger in 1970. The franchise has been conference champions three times since the merger, but has never won the Super Bowl. The Vikings have been divisional champions 20 times, most among current members of their division. Minnesota has played 820 regular and post-season games and has appeared in the post-season 29 times.The team's worst season was 1962, when it won two games, lost eleven, and tied one (a .179 winning percentage). Their worst seasons since the NFL changed to a 16-game schedule were in 1984 and 2011, when they could only manage a 3–13 record. The best regular-season record was achieved in 1998, when the Vikings went 15–1, but kicker Gary Anderson, who had gone 35-for-35 in field goal attempts during the regular season, missed a 38-yard attempt with less than three minutes remaining in the NFC Championship Game. With an overtime loss to the Atlanta Falcons, the Vikings became the first 15–1 team in NFL history not to reach the Super Bowl.

List of all-time NFL win–loss records

The following is a list of win–loss records for each of the 32 active National Football League (NFL) teams.

Mike McCarthy (American football)

Michael John McCarthy (born November 10, 1963) is an American football coach. He was the head coach of the Green Bay Packers of the National Football League (NFL) from 2006 to 2018, leading them to a win in Super Bowl XLV over his hometown team, the Pittsburgh Steelers. He was previously the offensive coordinator for the San Francisco 49ers and New Orleans Saints.

Mike Zimmer

Michael Zimmer (born June 5, 1956) is an American football head coach. He is currently the head coach of the Minnesota Vikings of the National Football League (NFL). He previously was a defensive coordinator for the Cincinnati Bengals, Atlanta Falcons, and Dallas Cowboys.

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