NFC East

The National Football Conference – Eastern Division or NFC East is one of the four divisions of the National Football Conference (NFC) in the National Football League (NFL). It currently has four members: the Dallas Cowboys, the New York Giants, the Philadelphia Eagles, and the Washington Redskins.

The division was formed in 1967 as the National Football League Capitol Division, keeping with the theme of having all of the league's divisions starting with the letter "C." The division was so named because it was centered on the capital of the United States, Washington, D.C. In 1967 and 1969 the teams in the NFL Capitol Division were Dallas, Philadelphia, Washington and the expansion team New Orleans Saints, which had been replaced by the New York Giants for the 1968 season. As of 2018, the NFC East is the only division in the league in which all four current teams have at least one Super Bowl win.

NFC East
ConferenceNational Football Conference
LeagueNational Football League
SportAmerican football
Founded1967 (as the NFL Eastern Conference Capitol Division)
CountryUnited States
Teams
No. of teams4
Championships
Most recent NFC East champion(s)Dallas Cowboys
Most NFC East titlesDallas Cowboys (23 titles)

History

The NFC East has a long history of being geographically inaccurate. After the 1970 NFL merger, the Cowboys and St. Louis Cardinals remained a part of the East until 2002 despite being geographically west of most teams in the conference.

To begin with, the Cowboys were only located east of two NFC teams that were outside of the East division (Rams and 49ers from the West division) while the Cardinals were east of one additional such team (Vikings from the Central division). The Tampa Bay Buccaneers joined the Central as an expansion team in 1976; they’re located east of Dallas and St. Louis. The Cardinals relocated to Phoenix to start the 1988 season and stayed in the East; that made them located west of every team in the NFC except for the Rams and 49ers. The Rams relocated from Los Angeles to St. Louis to start the 1995 season and stayed in the West, while the Carolina Panthers joined the West as an expansion team that same season; this made the Cardinals and Cowboys west of every team in the conference except for the 49ers from 1995–2001.

General Information

The NFC East teams have combined to be the most successful division in the NFL since the 1970 NFL merger with 21 NFC Championship wins and 13 Super Bowl victories, the highest marks of any division in the NFL. The division features a number of prominent rivalries such as the Cowboys–Redskins rivalry and Eagles–Giants rivalry. Because the division's teams are in some of the United States' largest media markets (New York No. 1, Philadelphia, No. 4, Dallas-Fort Worth No. 5, and Washington No. 6), the NFC East receives a high amount of coverage from national sports media outlets.[1] In the early 1990s the division claimed four consecutive Super Bowl champions, all 4 against the Buffalo Bills, with the Giants and Redskins respectively winning back-to-back in Super Bowls XXV and XXVI; and the Cowboys winning twice after in Super Bowls XXVII and XXVIII. Those same three teams won seven out of ten Super Bowls, from 1986-87 to 1995-96 (the 49ers won the other three during that span).

The Philadelphia Eagles are the only NFC East team to actually play in the city of the team's naming, Philadelphia.[2] The other three teams play in suburbs of the major cities they are named after. The Dallas Cowboys play in Arlington, Texas.[3] The Washington Redskins play in Landover, Maryland[4] and the New York Giants play in East Rutherford, New Jersey,[5] where they share a stadium with the New York Jets. Almost analogously, all four teams in the AFC East do not play within the boundaries of their metro areas’ main cities.

The NFC East can also be called the most valuable NFL division. All four teams in the division are in the top ten of most valuable NFL franchises (Cowboys #1; Giants #3; Redskins #4; Eagles #10).[6] The next closest division is the AFC North, which is not completed until the 26th ranked Cincinnati Bengals.[7]

Division lineups

Place cursor over year for division champ or Super Bowl team.

NFL Eastern Conference
Capitol Division
NFC East Division[B]
1900s 2000s
67[A] 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 00 01
Dallas Cowboys
Philadelphia Eagles
Washington Redskins
N.O. Saints NY Giants N.O. Saints New York Giants
  St. Louis Cardinals[C] Phoenix Cardinals Arizona Cardinals[D]
NFC East Division [D]
2000s
02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
Dallas Cowboys
Philadelphia Eagles
Washington Redskins
New York Giants
     Team not in division      Division Won Super Bowl      Division Won NFC Championship
A The Eastern Conference was divided into the Capitol and Century Divisions. Dallas, Philadelphia, and Washington moved in. Also, the New Orleans Saints joined the league.
B The Capitol Division adopts its current name. New Orleans realigned to the NFC West. The Giants and Cardinals are added from the Century Division.
C St. Louis moved to Phoenix in 1988. The team changed its name from Phoenix Cardinals to the Arizona Cardinals in 1994.
D Arizona moved to the NFC West when the league realigned into 8 four-team divisions before the 2002 season.

Division champions

As NFL Capitol Division

Season Team Record Playoff Results
NFL Capitol
1967 Dallas Cowboys 9–5 Won Conference Playoffs (Browns) 52–14
Lost NFL Championship Game (at Packers) 17–21
1968 Dallas Cowboys 12–2 Lost Conference Playoffs (at Browns) 20–31
1969 Dallas Cowboys 11–2–1 Lost Conference Playoffs (Browns) 14–38

There was one division sweep of the Capitol Division, 1969 Cowboys 6-0[8]

As NFC East

Season Team Record Playoff Results
1970 Dallas Cowboys 10–4 Won Divisional Playoffs (Lions) 5–0
Won NFC Championship (at 49ers) 17–10
Lost Super Bowl V (vs. Colts) 13–16
1971 Dallas Cowboys 11–3 Won Divisional Playoffs (at Vikings) 20–12
Won NFC Championship (49ers) 14–3
Won Super Bowl VI (vs. Dolphins) 24–3
1972 Washington Redskins 11–3 Won Divisional Playoffs (Packers) 16–3
Won NFC Championship (Cowboys) 26–3
Lost Super Bowl VII (vs. Dolphins) 7–14
1973 Dallas Cowboys 10–4 Won Divisional Playoffs (Rams) 27–16
Lost NFC Championship (Vikings) 10–27
1974 St. Louis Cardinals 10–4 Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Vikings) 14–30
1975 St. Louis Cardinals 11–3 Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Rams) 23–35
1976 Dallas Cowboys 11–3 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Rams) 12–14
1977 Dallas Cowboys 12–2 Won Divisional Playoffs (Bears) 37–7
Won NFC Championship (Vikings) 23–6
Won Super Bowl XII (vs. Broncos) 27–10
1978 Dallas Cowboys 12–4 Won Divisional Playoffs (Falcons) 27–20
Won NFC Championship (at Rams) 28–0
Lost Super Bowl XIII (vs. Steelers) 31–35
1979 Dallas Cowboys 11–5 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Rams) 19–21
1980 Philadelphia Eagles 12–4 Won Divisional Playoffs (Vikings) 31–16
Won NFC Championship (Cowboys) 20–7
Lost Super Bowl XV (vs. Raiders) 10–27
1981 Dallas Cowboys 12–4 Won Divisional Playoffs (Buccaneers) 38–0
Lost NFC Championship (at 49ers) 27–28
1982 Washington Redskins 8–1 Won First Round (Lions) 31–7
Won Second Round (Vikings) 21–7
Won NFC Championship (Cowboys) 31–17
Won Super Bowl XVII (vs. Dolphins) 27–17
1983 Washington Redskins 14–2 Won Divisional Playoffs (Rams) 51–7
Won NFC Championship (49ers) 24–21
Lost Super Bowl XVIII (vs. Raiders) 9–38
1984 Washington Redskins 11–5 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Bears) 19–23
1985 Dallas Cowboys 10–6 Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Rams) 0–20
1986 New York Giants 14–2 Won Divisional Playoffs (49ers) 49–3
Won NFC Championship (Redskins) 17–0
Won Super Bowl XXI (vs. Broncos) 39–20
1987 Washington Redskins 11–4 Won Divisional Playoffs (at Bears) 21–17
Won NFC Championship (Vikings) 17–10
Won Super Bowl XXII (vs. Broncos) 42–10
1988 Philadelphia Eagles 10–6 Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Bears) 12–20
1989 New York Giants 12–4 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Rams) 13–19 (OT)
1990 New York Giants 13–3 Won Divisional Playoffs (Bears) 31–3
Won NFC Championship (at 49ers) 15–13
Won Super Bowl XXV (vs. Bills) 20–19
1991 Washington Redskins 14–2 Won Divisional Playoffs (Falcons) 24–7
Won NFC Championship (Lions) 41–10
Won Super Bowl XXVI (vs. Bills) 37–24
1992 Dallas Cowboys 13–3 Won Divisional Playoffs (Eagles) 34–10
Won NFC Championship (at 49ers) 30–20
Won Super Bowl XXVII (vs. Bills) 52–17
1993 Dallas Cowboys 12–4 Won Divisional Playoffs (Packers) 27–17
Won NFC Championship (49ers) 38–21
Won Super Bowl XXVIII (vs. Bills) 30–13
1994 Dallas Cowboys 12–4 Won Divisional Playoffs (Packers) 35–9
Lost NFC Championship (at 49ers) 28–38
1995 Dallas Cowboys 12–4 Won Divisional Playoffs (Eagles) 30–11
Won NFC Championship (Packers) 38–27
Won Super Bowl XXX (5) (vs. Steelers) 27–17
1996 Dallas Cowboys 10–6 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Vikings) 40–15
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Panthers) 17–26
1997 New York Giants 10–5–1 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Vikings) 22–23
1998 Dallas Cowboys 10–6 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Cardinals) 7–20
1999 Washington Redskins 10–6 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Lions) 27–13
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Buccaneers) 13–14
2000 New York Giants 12–4 Won Divisional Playoffs (Eagles) 20–10
Won NFC Championship (Vikings) 41–0
Lost Super Bowl XXXV (vs. Ravens) 7–34
2001 Philadelphia Eagles 11–5 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Buccaneers) 31–9
Won Divisional playoffs (at Bears) 33–19
Lost NFC Championship (at Rams) 24–29
NFC East
2002 Philadelphia Eagles 12–4 Won Divisional Playoffs (Falcons) 20–6
Lost NFC Championship (Buccaneers) 10–27
2003 Philadelphia Eagles 12–4 Won Divisional Playoffs (Packers) 20–17 (OT)
Lost NFC Championship (Panthers) 3–14
2004 Philadelphia Eagles 13–3 Won Divisional Playoffs (Vikings) 27–14
Won NFC Championship (Falcons) 27–10
Lost Super Bowl XXXIX (vs. Patriots) 21–24
2005 New York Giants 11–5 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Panthers) 0–23
2006 Philadelphia Eagles 10–6 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Giants) 23–20
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Saints) 24–27
2007 Dallas Cowboys 13–3 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Giants) 17–21
2008 New York Giants 12–4 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Eagles) 11–23
2009 Dallas Cowboys 11–5 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Eagles) 34–14
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Vikings) 3–34
2010 Philadelphia Eagles 10–6 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Packers) 16–21
2011 New York Giants 9–7 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Falcons) 24–2
Won Divisional Playoffs (at Packers) 37–20
Won NFC Championship (at 49ers) 20–17 (OT)
Won Super Bowl XLVI (vs. Patriots) 21–17
2012 Washington Redskins 10–6 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Seahawks) 14–24
2013 Philadelphia Eagles 10–6 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Saints) 24–26
2014 Dallas Cowboys 12–4 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Lions) 24–20
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Packers) 21–26
2015 Washington Redskins 9–7 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Packers) 18–35
2016 Dallas Cowboys 13–3 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Packers) 31–34
2017 Philadelphia Eagles 13–3 Won Divisional Playoffs (Falcons) 15–10
Won NFC Championship (Vikings) 38–7
Won Super Bowl LII (vs. Patriots) 41–33
2018 Dallas Cowboys 10–6 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Seahawks) 24–22
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Rams) 22–30
  • * A players' strike in 1982 reduced the regular season to nine games. Thus, the league used a special 16-team playoff tournament just for this year. Division standings were ignored; Washington had the best record of the division teams and won the Super Bowl.
  • ++ The 1987 Redskins are the only NFC 3rd Seed to win the Super Bowl.[9]
  • ^ The 2007 Dallas Cowboys were defeated by division rival and NFC 5th Seed New York Giants, who ultimately won Super Bowl XLII.
  • # The 2011 New York Giants are the only sub-10-win team to win the Super Bowl (other than the 1982 Redskins listed above), as well as the only team to win the Super Bowl as the NFC's 4th Seed.[9]

All four teams in the NFC East have won the Super Bowl. The Cowboys lead with five, followed by the Giants with four, the Redskins with three, and the Eagles with one. In overall NFL history, however, the Giants lead with eight league championships, followed by the Redskins and Cowboys with five each, then the Eagles with four.

There have been two division sweeps of the NFC East Division, the 1998 Dallas Cowboys (8–0) and the 2004 Philadelphia Eagles (6–0).[8]

Wild Card qualifiers

Season Team Record Playoff Results
NFC East
1971 Washington Redskins 9–4–1 Lost Divisional Playoffs (at 49ers) 20–24
1972 Dallas Cowboys 10–4 Won Divisional Playoffs (at 49ers) 30–28
Lost NFC Championship (at Redskins) 3–26
1973 Washington Redskins 10–4 Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Vikings) 20–27
1974 Washington Redskins 10–4 Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Rams) 10–19
1975 Dallas Cowboys 10–4 Won Divisional Playoffs (at Vikings) 17–14
Won NFC Championship (at Rams) 37–7
Lost Super Bowl X (vs. Steelers) 17–21
1976 Washington Redskins 10–4 Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Vikings) 20–35
1978 Philadelphia Eagles 9–7 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Falcons) 13–14
1979 Philadelphia Eagles 11–5 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Bears) 27–17
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Buccaneers) 17–24
1980 Dallas Cowboys 12–4 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Rams) 34–13
Won Divisional Playoffs (at Falcons) 30–27
Lost NFC Championship (at Eagles) 7–20
1981 Philadelphia Eagles 10–6 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Giants) 21–27
New York Giants 9–7 Won Wild Card Playoffs (at Eagles) 27–21
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at 49ers) 24–38
1982+ Dallas Cowboys 6–3 Won First Round Playoffs (Buccaneers) 30–17
Won Second Round Playoffs (Packers) 37–26
Lost NFC Championship (at Redskins) 17–31
St. Louis Cardinals 5–4 Lost First Round Playoffs (at Packers) 16–41
1983 Dallas Cowboys 12–4 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Rams) 17–24
1984 New York Giants 9–7 Won Wild Card Playoffs (at Rams) 16–13
Divisional Playoffs (at 49ers) 10–21
1985 New York Giants 10–6 Won Wild Card Playoffs (49ers) 17–3
Divisional Playoffs (at Bears) 0–21
1986 Washington Redskins 12–4 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Rams) 19–7
Won Divisional Playoffs (at Bears) 27–13
Lost NFC Championship (at Giants) 0–17
1989 Philadelphia Eagles 11–5 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Rams) 7–21
1990 Washington Redskins 10–6 Won Wild Card Playoffs (at Eagles) 20–6
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at 49ers) 10–28
Philadelphia Eagles 10–6 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Redskins) 6–20
1991 Dallas Cowboys 11–5 Won Wild Card Playoffs (at Bears) 17–13
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Lions) 6–38
1992 Philadelphia Eagles 10–6 Won Wild Card Playoffs (at Saints) 36–20
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Cowboys) 10–34
Washington Redskins 9–7 Won Wild Card Playoffs (at Vikings) 24–7
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at 49ers) 13–20
1993 New York Giants 11–5 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Vikings) 17–10
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at 49ers) 3–44
1995 Philadelphia Eagles 10–6 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Lions) 58–37
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Cowboys) 11–30
1996 Philadelphia Eagles 10–6 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at 49ers) 0–14
1998 Arizona Cardinals 9–7 Won Wild Card Playoffs (at Cowboys) 20–7
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Vikings) 21–41
1999 Dallas Cowboys 8–8 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Vikings) 10–27
2000 Philadelphia Eagles 11–5 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Buccaneers) 21–3
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Giants) 10–20
NFC East
2002 New York Giants 10–6 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at 49ers) 38–39
2003 Dallas Cowboys 10–6 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Panthers) 10–29
2005 Washington Redskins 10–6 Won Wild Card Playoffs (at Buccaneers) 17–10
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Seahawks) 10–20
2006 Dallas Cowboys 9–7 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Seahawks) 20–21
New York Giants 8–8 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Eagles) 20–23
2007 New York Giants 10–6 Won Wild Card Playoffs (at Buccaneers) 24–14
Won Divisional Playoffs (at Cowboys) 21–17
Won NFC Championship (at Packers) 23–20 (OT)
Won Super Bowl XLII (vs. Patriots) 17–14
Washington Redskins 9–7 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Seahawks) 14–35
2008 Philadelphia Eagles 9–6–1 Won Wild Card Playoffs (at Vikings) 26–14
Won Divisional Playoffs (at Giants) 23–11
Lost NFC Championship (at Cardinals) 25–32
2009 Philadelphia Eagles 11–5 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Cowboys) 14–34
2016 New York Giants 11–5 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Packers) 13–18
2018 Philadelphia Eagles 9–7 Won Wild Card Playoffs (at Bears) 16–15
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Saints) 14–20
  • + A players' strike in 1982 reduced the regular season to nine games, so the league used a special 16-team playoff tournament just for this year.
  • ** The 2007 New York Giants are the only NFC East team to win a Super Bowl as a Wild Card team, and the only NFL team in history to win the Super Bowl as a 5th Seed in either Conference.[9]

Total playoff berths

(NFC East records 1967-2017)
Team Division
Championships
Playoff
Berths
Super Bowl
Appearances
Super Bowl
Championships
Dallas Cowboys 23 33 8 5
Philadelphia Eagles 10 22 3 1
Washington Redskins 9 18 5 3
New York Giants 8 15 5 4
Arizona Cardinals1 2 4 0 0

To sort table above, click button to right of heading.

NFC East Division
Championships
Playoff
Berths
NFC
Championships
Super Bowl
Championships
Totals- 1967-2017 52 90 22 13
1These numbers only reflect the Cardinals' time as a member of the NFC East, as the team realigned to the NFC West after the 2001 season.

Season results

(#) Denotes team that won the Super Bowl
(#) Denotes team that won the NFC Championship
(#) Denotes team that qualified for the NFL Playoffs
Season Team (record)
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th
NFL Capitol
1967 Dallas (9–5) Philadelphia (6–7–1) Washington (5–6–3) New Orleans (3–11)
1968 Dallas (12–2) N.Y. Giants (7–7) Washington (5–9) Philadelphia (2–12)
1969 Dallas (11–2–1) Washington (7–5–2) New Orleans (5–9) Philadelphia (4–9–1)
NFC East
1970 Dallas (10–4) N.Y. Giants (9–5) St. Louis (8–5–1) Washington (6–8) Philadelphia (3–10–1)
1971 Dallas (11–3) Washington (9–4–1) Philadelphia (6–7–1) St. Louis (4–9–1) N.Y. Giants (4–10)
1972 Washington (11–3) Dallas (10–4) N.Y. Giants (8–6) St. Louis (4–9–1) Philadelphia (2–11–1)
1973 Dallas (10–4) Washington (10–4) Philadelphia (5–8–1) St. Louis (4–9–1) N.Y. Giants (2–11–1)
1974 St. Louis (10–4) Washington (10–4) Dallas (8–6) Philadelphia (7–7) N.Y. Giants (2–12)
1975 (3) St. Louis (11–3) (4) Dallas (10–4) Washington (8–6) N.Y. Giants (5–9) Philadelphia (4–10)
1976 (2) Dallas (11–3) (4) Washington (10–4) St. Louis (10–4) Philadelphia (4–10) N.Y. Giants (3–11)
1977 (1) Dallas (12–2) Washington (9–5) St. Louis (7–7) Philadelphia (5–9) N.Y. Giants (5–9)
1978 (2) Dallas (12–4) (5) Philadelphia (9–7) Washington (8–8) St. Louis (6–10) N.Y. Giants (6–10)
1979 (1) Dallas (11–5) (4) Philadelphia (11–5) Washington (10–6) N.Y. Giants (6–10) St. Louis (5–11)
1980 (2) Philadelphia (12–4) (4) Dallas (12–4) Washington (6–10) St. Louis (5–11) N.Y. Giants (4–12)
1981 (2) Dallas (12–4) (4) Philadelphia (10–6) (5) N.Y. Giants (9–7) Washington (8–8) St. Louis (7–9)
1982^ (1) Washington (8–1) (2) Dallas (6–3) (6) St. Louis (5–4) N.Y. Giants (4–5) Philadelphia (3–6)
1983 (1) Washington (14–2) (4) Dallas (12–4) St. Louis (8–7–1) Philadelphia (5–11) N.Y. Giants (3–12–1)
1984 (2) Washington (11–5) (5) N.Y. Giants (9–7) St. Louis (9–7) Dallas (9–7) Philadelphia (6–9–1)
1985 (3) Dallas (10–6) (4) N.Y. Giants (10–6) Washington (10–6) Philadelphia (7–9) St. Louis (5–11)
1986 (1) N.Y. Giants (14–2) (4) Washington (12–4) Dallas (7–9) Philadelphia (5–10–1) St. Louis (4–11–1)
1987 (3) Washington (11–4) Dallas (7–8) St. Louis (7–8) Philadelphia (7–8) N.Y. Giants (6–9)
1988 (3) Philadelphia (10–6) N.Y. Giants (10–6) Washington (7–9) Phoenix (7–9) Dallas (3–13)
1989 (2) N.Y. Giants (12–4) (4) Philadelphia (11–5) Washington (10–6) Phoenix (5–11) Dallas (1–15)
1990 (2) N.Y. Giants (13–3) (4) Philadelphia (10–6) (5) Washington (10–6) Dallas (7–9) Phoenix (5–11)
1991 (1) Washington (14–2) (5) Dallas (11–5) Philadelphia (10–6) N.Y. Giants (8–8) Phoenix (4–12)
1992 (2) Dallas (13–3) (5) Philadelphia (11–5) (6) Washington (9–7) N.Y. Giants (6–10) Phoenix (4–12)
1993 (1) Dallas (12–4) (4) N.Y. Giants (11–5) Philadelphia (8–8) Phoenix (7–9) Washington (4–12)
1994 (2) Dallas (12–4) N.Y. Giants (9–7) Arizona (8–8) Philadelphia (7–9) Washington (3–13)
1995 (1) Dallas (12–4) (4) Philadelphia (10–6) Washington (6–10) N.Y. Giants (5–11) Arizona (4–12)
1996 (3) Dallas (10–6) (5) Philadelphia (10–6) Washington (9–7) Arizona (7–9) N.Y. Giants (6–10)
1997 (3) N.Y. Giants (10–5–1) Washington (8–7–1) Philadelphia (6–9–1) Dallas (6–10) Arizona (4–12)
1998 (3) Dallas (10–6) (6) Arizona (9–7) N.Y. Giants (8–8) Washington (6–10) Philadelphia (3–13)
1999 (3) Washington (10–6) (5) Dallas (8–8) N.Y. Giants (7–9) Arizona (6–10) Philadelphia (5–11)
2000 (1) N.Y. Giants (12–4) (4) Philadelphia (11–5) Washington (8–8) Dallas (5–11) Arizona (3–13)
2001 (3) Philadelphia (11–5) Washington (8–8) N.Y. Giants (7–9) Arizona (7–9) Dallas (5–11)
2002 (1) Philadelphia (12–4) (5) N.Y. Giants (10–6) Washington (7–9) Dallas (5–11)
2003 (1) Philadelphia (12–4) (6) Dallas (10–6) Washington (5–11) N.Y. Giants (4–12)
2004 (1) Philadelphia (13–3) N.Y. Giants (6–10) Dallas (6–10) Washington (6–10)
2005 (4) N.Y. Giants (11–5) (6) Washington (10–6) Dallas (9–7) Philadelphia (6–10)
2006 (3) Philadelphia (10–6) (5) Dallas (9–7) (6) N.Y. Giants (8–8) Washington (5–11)
2007 (1) Dallas (13–3) (5) N.Y. Giants (10–6) (6) Washington (9–7) Philadelphia (8–8)
2008 (1) N.Y. Giants (12–4) (6) Philadelphia (9–6–1) Dallas (9–7) Washington (8–8)
2009 (3) Dallas (11–5) (6) Philadelphia (11–5) N.Y. Giants (8–8) Washington (4–12)
2010 (3) Philadelphia (10–6) N.Y. Giants (10–6) Dallas (6–10) Washington (6–10)
2011 (4) N.Y. Giants (9–7) Philadelphia (8–8) Dallas (8–8) Washington (5–11)
2012 (4) Washington (10–6) N.Y. Giants (9–7) Dallas (8–8) Philadelphia (4–12)
2013 (3) Philadelphia (10–6) Dallas (8–8) N.Y. Giants (7–9) Washington (3–13)
2014 (3) Dallas (12–4) Philadelphia (10–6) N.Y. Giants (6–10) Washington (4–12)
2015 (4) Washington (9–7) Philadelphia (7–9) N.Y. Giants (6–10) Dallas (4–12)
2016 (1) Dallas (13–3) (5) N.Y. Giants (11–5) Washington (8–7–1) Philadelphia (7–9)
2017 (1) Philadelphia (13–3) Dallas (9–7) Washington (7–9) N.Y. Giants (3–13)
2018 (4) Dallas (10–6) (6) Philadelphia (9–7) Washington (7–9) N.Y. Giants (5–11)

See also

References

  1. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on April 7, 2012. Retrieved July 20, 2012.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  2. ^ "Lincoln Financial Field - Google Maps". Google Maps. Retrieved November 30, 2016.
  3. ^ "AT&T Stadium - Google Maps". Google Maps. Retrieved November 30, 2016.
  4. ^ "FedExField". Redskins. Retrieved December 12, 2016.
  5. ^ "Met Life Stadium - Google Maps". Google Maps. Retrieved November 30, 2016.
  6. ^ "Sports Money: 2017 NFL Valuations". Forbes. Retrieved April 2, 2018.
  7. ^ Ozanian, Mike (September 5, 2012). "Dallas Cowboys Lead NFL With $2.1 Billion Valuation". Forbes. Retrieved November 30, 2016.
  8. ^ a b "NFL.com - Official Site of the National Football League - NFL.com". www.nfl.com.
  9. ^ a b c "Graphic: Which NFL Playoff Seeds Succeed?".
1974 St. Louis Cardinals (NFL) season

The 1974 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 55th year with the National Football League and the 15th season in St. Louis. The Cardinals scored 285 points while the defense gave up 218 points, en route to the NFC East Championship.The 10–4 Cardinals qualified for the postseason for the first time since 1948 when the franchise was based in Chicago. It was the Cardinals first winning season since 1970 when the Cardinals went 8–5–1. Although the Cardinals and the Washington Redskins finished with identical 10–4 records, the Cardinals won the NFC East title, because of their two victories over Washington that season.

The Cardinals won their first seven games, and were at least tied for first place from Week One to the end of the regular season.

1975 St. Louis Cardinals (NFL) season

The 1975 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 56th year with the National Football League and the 16th season in St. Louis. The club scored 356 points while the defense gave up 276 points. The club appeared in the playoffs for the second consecutive year, by winning the NFC East with a record of eleven wins and three losses. They were not again to appear in the playoffs during a full NFL season until 1998, by which time they had left St. Louis.

The team was nicknamed the “Cardiac Cards”, because eight of their games were decided in the final minute of play; the Cardinals went 7–1 in these games.

1976 Dallas Cowboys season

The 1976 Dallas Cowboys season was their 17th in the league. The team improved on their previous output of 10–4, winning eleven games. They qualified for the playoffs, but were stunned by the Los Angeles Rams in the Divisional round.

1984 Washington Redskins season

The 1984 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 53rd season in the National Football League. They failed to improve on their 14–2 record from 1983 and finished at 11-5. Art Monk set an NFL record (since broken) for most receptions in a season. The Redskins started the season losing their first two games but would recover to win their next five games. A mid-season slump had them on the playoff bubble at 7-5. However, the Redskins would finish the season in strong fashion winning their final four games to win the NFC East with an 11-5 record. The Redskins quest for a third straight NFC Championship ended quickly as the Skins were stunned by the Chicago Bears 23-19 at RFK Stadium. The 1984 Redskins have an NFL-record 14 straight games with 3 or more sacks, having accomplished that from weeks 3 to 16.

1987 Washington Redskins season

The 1987 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's strike-shortened 56th season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 52nd in Washington, D.C. The season was a shortened due to the 1987 NFL strike.

The team had finished second in the NFC East the previous season with a 12–4 record. Games to be played during the third week of the season were canceled, and replacement players were used to play games from weeks 4 through 6.

The Redskins won the NFC East with an 11–4 record. The Redskins defeated the Denver Broncos 42–10 to win Super Bowl XXII. It was the Redskins' second Super Bowl win in six seasons, and coincidentally, their second Super Bowl win in a strike-season.Redskins quarterback Doug Williams became the first black quarterback to start in a Super Bowl and was the only individual to have emerged victorious until Russell Wilson won Super Bowl XLVIII with the Seattle Seahawks.By virtue of the Redskins' 17-10 victory over Minnesota in the NFC title game, head coach Joe Gibbs earned his 10th playoff victory. He surpassed the legendary Vince Lombardi, who had retired after his 9th playoff victory and (coincidentally) later coached the Redskins for one season. Also ironic was the rumor that, following a disastrous 5-9-1 season, Green Bay would hire Gibbs to replace the dismissed Forrest Gregg. However, after the game, Gibbs would deny that he was interested. On March 8, 2018 the Redskins announced that they will honor the replacement players from the 1987 team with Super Bowl XXII rings.

1988 Philadelphia Eagles season

The 1988 Philadelphia Eagles season was the franchise's 56th season in the National Football League.

This season resulted an appearance in the postseason for the first time since 1981. The Eagles won the NFC East for the first time in seven seasons, but lost to the Chicago Bears in the NFC Divisional round during the Fog Bowl.

On the final day of the regular season, Philadelphia dumped Dallas, 23–7, but had to wait for the end to the Jets-Giants game at Giants Stadium to learn if they had clinched the division or not. The Jets won the game, 27–21, on a late TD strike from Ken O'Brien to Al Toon, giving the Eagles the NFC East crown on the tiebreaker of having beaten the Giants in both regular-season meetings.

1989 New York Giants season

The 1989 New York Giants season was the franchise's 65th season in the National Football League. After going 10–6 and suffering a heartbreaking final-day elimination from playoff contention in 1988, the team went 12–4 and won the NFC East. The Giants lost to the Los Angeles Rams in the NFC Divisional playoffs.

1996 Dallas Cowboys season

The 1996 Dallas Cowboys season was the franchise's 37th season in the National Football League and was the third year under head coach Barry Switzer. Following their victory in Super Bowl XXX, the Cowboys endured a rough year failing to improve their 12-4 record from 1995 but still reached the playoffs with a 10-6 record. Star receiver Michael Irvin was suspended by the league for the first five games and before the playoffs were accused with lineman Erik Williams of sexual assault. Controversy also took place when writer Skip Bayless published a scathing account of the Cowboys' 1995 season. Longtime trainer Mike Woicik also left the team after the season following a sideline dispute with coach Barry Switzer although Woicik returned in 2011.

This season would be the last season the Cowboys won a playoff game until 2009, and since their Super Bowl win the previous season, the Cowboys never made it past the divisional round as of 2018.

1997 New York Giants season

The 1997 New York Giants season was the franchise's 73rd season in the National Football League and the first under head coach Jim Fassel. The team improved upon their previous season's output of 6–10, winning ten games including a tie against the Washington Redskins, it was the first tie for the Giants since 1983. and qualifying for the playoffs for the first time in four seasons. In the playoffs, the Giants lost to the Minnesota Vikings in the Wild Card Game 23-22.

1998 Dallas Cowboys season

The 1998 Dallas Cowboys season was the Cowboys' 39th season in the NFL. Team owner Jerry Jones would hire former Pittsburgh Steelers offensive coordinator Chan Gailey to be the fourth head coach of the Dallas Cowboys franchise.

1999 Washington Redskins season

The 1999 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 68th season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 63rd in Washington, D.C. The team improved on their 6–10 record from 1998 to 10–6. They succeeded to the extent of reaching their first postseason appearance since 1992 and beating the Lions in the first week of the playoffs, before losing to the Buccaneers by a single point in the divisional playoff round. The season would also be the first for new team owner Daniel Snyder. It would be the final season that the Redskins have qualified for the playoffs in the 1990s and for the next five seasons, the team fell out of contention. They returned to the playoffs in 2005.

History of the St. Louis Cardinals (NFL)

The professional American football team now known as the Arizona Cardinals previously played in St. Louis, Missouri as the St. Louis Cardinals from 1960 to 1987 before relocating to Tempe, Arizona in 1988. The Cardinals franchise relocated from Chicago to St. Louis in 1960. Their first home game in St. Louis was at Sportsman's Park against the New York Giants on October 2, 1960. Their last game played at Busch Memorial Stadium in St. Louis was against the Giants on December 13, 1987. Their last game as a St. Louis-based club was on December 27, 1987 at the Dallas Cowboys.

During the Cardinals' 28-year stay in St. Louis, they advanced to the playoffs just three times (1974, 1975, and 1982), never hosting or winning in any appearance. In spite of what was considered lackluster performance in St. Louis, their overall record there (winning 187 games, losing 202, and 13 ties) (a winning percentage of .481) is easily the highest winning percentage for any of the three locations that the Cardinals have been associated with.

Jason Garrett

Jason Calvin Garrett (born March 28, 1966) is the head coach of the Dallas Cowboys of the National Football League (NFL). He was the offensive coordinator and assistant head coach of the Cowboys before being promoted to interim head coach after the firing of Wade Phillips on November 8, 2010. Garrett was also a professional American football quarterback in the NFL for the Dallas Cowboys, New York Giants, Tampa Bay Buccaneers and Miami Dolphins. He played college football at Princeton University.

List of Arizona Cardinals seasons

This is a list of seasons completed by the Arizona Cardinals. The Cardinals are an American football franchise competing as a member of the West division of the National Football Conference (NFC) in the National Football League (NFL). The list documents the season-by-season records of the Cardinals' franchise from 1920 to present, including postseason records, and league awards for individual players or head coaches.

List of Dallas Cowboys seasons

This article is a list of seasons completed by the Dallas Cowboys American football franchise of the National Football League (NFL). The list documents the season-by-season records of the Cowboys' franchise from 1960 to present, including postseason records, and league awards for individual players or head coaches. The Cowboys franchise was founded in 1960 as an expansion team. The team has earned 33 postseason appearances, most in the NFL, the longest consecutive streak of winning seasons with 20, the second-most appearances in the NFC Championship Game (14, behind the San Francisco 49ers' 15) and the second-most Super Bowl appearances (8 with the Denver Broncos and Steelers). The Cowboys have played for 10 NFL Championships and have won 5, all five being Super Bowls.The Cowboys won Super Bowl VI, XII, XXVII, XXVIII and XXX. They also played in and lost Super Bowl V, X, and XIII.The franchise has experienced two major periods of continued success in their history. The first period of success came from 1966–1985 when the Cowboys played in the postseason 18 times. During this period, they played in two NFL Championships and five Super Bowls, winning two of them, winning a total of 20 playoff games. The second period of success was between 1991–1996 when the Cowboys captured five straight NFC East Division titles and won three Super Bowls going 12-3 in the postseason.Outside of these 2 periods of success, the Cowboys have experienced short periods failure in their history. The three most notable periods of failure was from their 1960 inaugural season to 1965, during which the Cowboys did not have a single postseason appearance. They did not win a single game during their first season, compiling an 0–11–1 record that is still the worst in franchise history. Also, they did not have a single winning record in this period.

Between 1986 and 1990 the Cowboys had losing records in each season as veteran coach Landry retired and the team was radically overhauled, with the low point being the NFL's second 15-loss season (after the 1980 Saints) in 1989. After losing a Divisional playoff Game in 1996, the Cowboys between 1997 and 2008 lost five consecutive playoff games, one after a franchise-record 13–3 season in 2007, during which most predicted the Cowboys would break this streak. This streak finally came to an end when the Cowboys beat their bitter rival, the Philadelphia Eagles 34–14 after an 11–5 season in 2009.Nonetheless, through the 2018 football season, the Cowboys holds the NFL's all-time best winning percentage (.574) and has made more playoff appearances than any other NFL team (33). Also, of the 31 other franchises it has faced, Dallas leads the head to head series in 24 matchups, trail in 4 (Cleveland, Baltimore, Denver and Green Bay) and is tied in 3 others (Oakland, Miami and L.A Rams)

List of New York Giants seasons

The New York Giants are an American football team based in East Rutherford, New Jersey. They are a member of the National Football League (NFL) and play in the NFL's National Football Conference (NFC) East division. In 94 completed seasons, the franchise has won eight NFL championships, including four Super Bowl victories. The Giants have won more than 600 games and appeared in the NFL playoffs 32 times. Though the Giants play home games in East Rutherford, they draw fans from throughout the New York metropolitan area. In 2010, the team began playing in MetLife Stadium, formerly New Meadowlands Stadium.After Tim Mara paid $500 for the franchise, the Giants joined the NFL in the 1925 season and won their first championship two years later. In 1934, the team won its second title, defeating the Chicago Bears in the NFL Championship Game. The Giants won another championship four years later, and made four appearances in the NFL Championship Game from 1939 to 1946, losing each time. New York won its fourth NFL title in 1956, with a 47–7 win over the Bears in the championship game. From 1958 to 1963, the Giants reached the NFL Championship Game five times, but were defeated on each occasion. Following the 1963 season, the franchise did not return to the playoffs until 1981, only finishing .500 or better five times during the postseason drought.

Thirty years after the team's previous NFL title, the Giants were victorious in Super Bowl XXI, winning against the Denver Broncos 39–20 to end the 1986 season. The Giants won their second Super Bowl four years later, defeating the Buffalo Bills 20–19 in Super Bowl XXV. In the 2000 season, New York returned to the Super Bowl, but lost to the Baltimore Ravens 34–7. The 2007 season saw the Giants win their seventh NFL championship at Super Bowl XLII, where they defeated the previously unbeaten New England Patriots 17–14 in a game that is widely considered to be one of the biggest upsets in Super Bowl history. The Giants made four consecutive appearances in the playoffs from 2005 to 2008, before an 8–8 record in 2009 caused them to miss the postseason. After missing the playoffs in 2010, they defeated the Atlanta Falcons, Green Bay Packers, and San Francisco 49ers in the 2011 playoffs to reach Super Bowl XLVI, where they defeated the Patriots 21–17. In the most recent season, 2018, the Giants went 5–11 and did not qualify for the postseason.

List of Philadelphia Eagles seasons

This article is a list of seasons completed by the Philadelphia Eagles, a professional American football franchise based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Eagles are a member of the National Football Conference (NFC) East division in the National Football League (NFL). This article documents the season-by-season records of the Eagles’ franchise from 1933 to present, including postseason records, as well as league awards for individual players or head coaches. The Philadelphia Eagles won their 500th game on Sunday, October 26, 2009 over the Atlanta Falcons by a score of 27–14. They were the seventh NFL team to accomplish this feat and the first since the San Francisco 49ers defeated the St. Louis Rams in week 16 of the 2005 NFL season. They are also the first team in the NFC East to accomplish this feat since the Washington Redskins defeated the Jacksonville Jaguars in Week 8 of the 2000 NFL season. As of 2018, the Eagles have never lost a game to the New York Jets (10–0) or the Houston Texans (5–0).

The Eagles have won four league titles. Three of these were won prior to the start of the Super Bowl era (in 1948, 1949, and 1960). The fourth and most recent championship was won in Super Bowl LII.

List of Washington Redskins seasons

This article is a list of seasons completed by the Washington Redskins American football franchise of the National Football League (NFL). The list documents the season-by-season records of the Redskins' franchise from 1932 to present, including postseason records, and league awards for individual players or head coaches. The Redskins franchise was founded as the Boston Braves, named after the local baseball franchise. The team changed their name to the Redskins in 1933 and moved to Washington, D.C. in 1937.The Redskins have played over 1,000 games. In those games, the club won five professional American football championships including two NFL Championships and three Super Bowls. The franchise captured ten NFL divisional titles and six NFL conference championships.The Redskins won the 1937 and 1942 Championship games, as well as Super Bowl XVII, XXII, and XXVI. They also played in and lost the 1936, 1940, 1943, and 1945 Championship games, as well as Super Bowl VII and XVIII. They have made 24 postseason appearances, and have an overall postseason record of 23 wins and 19 losses. Only five teams have appeared in more Super Bowls than the Redskins: the New England Patriots (nine), the Dallas Cowboys, Pittsburgh Steelers, Denver Broncos (all with eight), and San Francisco 49ers (six); the Redskins' five appearances are tied with the Oakland Raiders, Miami Dolphins, New York Giants and Green Bay Packers.All of the Redskins' league titles were attained during two ten-year spans. From 1936 to 1945, the Redskins went to the NFL Championship six times, winning two of them. The second period lasted between 1982 and 1991 where the Redskins appeared in the postseason seven times, captured four Conference titles, and won three Super Bowls out of four appearances.The Redskins have also experienced failure in their history. The most notable period of failure was from 1946 to 1970, during which the Redskins did not have a single postseason appearance. During this period, the Redskins went without a single winning season between 1956 and 1968. In 1961 season, the franchise posted their worst regular season record with a 1–12–1 showing.

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