NDF Rebellion

The NDF Rebellion was an uprising in the Yemen Arab Republic by the National Democratic Front, under Yahya Shami,[2] between 1978 and 1982.[3] The rebellion began in 1978, following the death of Ahmad al-Ghashmi and the rise to power of Ali Abdullah Saleh.[3] The NDF was supported in its rebellion by the PDRY[3] and Libya.[2] The NDF enjoyed various successes throughout the war, although it was weakened by the peace treaty between North and South Yemen following the 1979 border war.[3]

There were several attempts at ceasefires between the government and the NDF. Kuwait managed to facilitate the signing of a ceasefire between the government and the NDF on 26 November 1981, although hostilities re-erupted in December 1981.[2] Later, the Palestinian Liberation Organization was able to mediate a ceasefire agreement on 3 April 1982, however hostilities began again later the same April, with the NDF capturing Juban. Government forces in turn attacked NDF positions in Juban in May 1982.

PDRY support for the NDF diminished under the Presidency of the less overtly militant Ali Nasir Muhammad,[3] and PDRY support for the NDF finally ended in May 1982.[2] The NDF was eventually defeated by a rejuvenated YAR Army in conjunction with the pro-government Islamic Front, allowing the YAR government to finally establish control over the North-South border region.[3]

NDF Rebellion
Part of the Arab Cold War
Divided Yemen

North & South Yemen
Date1978 – 1982
(4 years)
Location
North Yemen
Result Government victory
Belligerents

 North Yemen
Flag of Jihad.svg Islamic Front

Supported by:
 United States
 Saudi Arabia
 Taiwan

Yemeni Socialist Party Flag.svg NDF
Supported by:
 South Yemen
 Libya

 Soviet Union
Commanders and leaders

Yemen Arab Republic Ali Abdullah Saleh

Yemen Arab Republic Ali Mohsen al-Ahmar
Yemeni Socialist Party Flag.svg Yahya Shami
Yemeni Socialist Party Flag.svg Sultan Ahmad Umar
Abdel Fattah Ismail
Strength
15,000

See also

References

  1. ^ Foreign Policy in Focus, Yemen, the United States, and Al-Qaida. December 19, 2001, retrieved Sept. 19, 2009 Archived July 26, 2009, at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ a b c d 10. Kingdom of Yemen/Yemen Arab Republic/North Yemen (1918-1990) - University of Central Arkansas
  3. ^ a b c d e f Burrowes, Robert D. (2010). Historical Dictionary of Yemen. Rowman & Littlefield. p. 252.
ASEAN Declaration

The ASEAN Declaration or Bangkok Declaration is the founding document of Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). It was signed in Bangkok on 8 August 1967 by the five ASEAN founding members, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand as a display of solidarity against communist expansion in Vietnam and communist insurgency within their own borders. It states the basic principles of ASEAN: co-operation, amity, and non-interference. The date is now celebrated as ASEAN Day.

Ar-Rashid revolt

The ar-Rashid revolt refers to a 1963 failed uprising against the Baathist government in Iraq. The revolt was plotted by followers of the Iraqi Communist Party in junction with military officers. The revolt failed to spread outside Baghdad and was crushed by the Baathist forces.

Asian Relations Conference

The Asian Relations Conference took place in New Delhi in March-April 1947. It was hosted by Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru, who then headed a provisional government that was preparing for India's Independence, which came on 15 August 1947. The Asian Relations Conference brought together many leaders of the independence movements in Asia, and represented a first attempt to assert Asian unity. The objectives of the conference were "to bring together the leading men and women of Asia on a common platform to study the problems of common concern to the people of the continent, to focus attention on social, economic and cultural problems of the different countries of Asia, and to foster mutual contact and understanding."

In his writings and speeches, Nehru had laid great emphasis on the manner in which post-colonial India would rebuild its Asia connections. At this conference Nehru declared: "... Asia is again finding herself ... one of the notable consequences of the European domination of Asia has been the isolation of the countries of Asia from one another. ... Today this isolation is breaking down because of many reasons, political and otherwise ... This Conference is significant as an expression of that deeper urge of the mind and spirit of Asia which has persisted ... In this Conference and in this work there are no leaders and no followers. All countries of Asia have to meet together in a common task ..."

Civil conflict in the Philippines

The civil conflict in the Philippines as of February 2019, consists of an insurgency pitting Government forces against Maoist rebels, that began in 1969 during the rule of Ferdinand Marcos.

the CPP–NPA–NDF rebellion

the Moro conflict (until February 2019)

Communist insurgency in the Philippines

Communist insurgency in the Philippines may refer to:

Hukbalahap Rebellion (1942–1954)

CPP-NPA-NDF rebellion (1969–present)

Communist rebellion in the Philippines

The CPP–NPA–NDF rebellion refers to the ongoing conflict between the Government of the Philippines (GPH) and the communist coalition of the Communist Party of the Philippines (CPP), the New People's Army (NPA), and the National Democratic Front (NDF).

In 1969, the NPA was formed, and the first violent incident took place in 1971. A year later, President Ferdinand Marcos introduced martial law. Until 2002, the NPA received a considerable amount of aid from outside the Philippines, although later developments forced it to rely on support from local sources. Between 1969 and 2008, more than 43,000 insurgency-related fatalities were recorded.

Exercise Verity

Exercise Verity was the only major training exercise of the Western Union (WU). Undertaken in July 1949, it involved 60 warships from the British, French, Belgian and Dutch navies. A contemporary newsreel described this exercise as involving "the greatest assembly of warships since the Battle of Jutland."

Guerrilla war in the Baltic states

The Guerrilla war in the Baltic states or the Forest Brothers resistance movement was the armed struggle against Soviet rule that spanned from 1940 to the mid-1950s. After the occupation of the Baltic territories by the Soviets in 1944, an insurgency started. According to some estimates, 10,000 partisans in Estonia, 10,000 partisans in Latvia and 30,000 partisans in Lithuania and many more supporters were involved. This war continued as an organised struggle until 1956 when the superiority of the Soviet military caused the native population to adopt other forms of resistance. While estimates related to the extent of partisan movement vary, but there seems to be a consensus among researchers that by international standards, the Baltic guerrilla movements were extensive. Proportionally, the partisan movement in the post-war Baltic states was of a similar size as the Viet Cong movement in South Vietnam.

Jamaican political conflict

The Jamaican political conflict is a long standing feud between right-wing and left-wing elements in the country, often exploding into violence. The Jamaican Labor Party and the People's National Party have fought for control of the island for years and the rivalry has encouraged urban warfare in Kingston. Each side believes the other to be controlled by foreign elements, the JLP is said to be backed by the American Central Intelligence Agency and the PNP is said to been backed by the Soviet Union and Fidel Castro.

Johnson Doctrine

The Johnson Doctrine, enunciated by U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson after the United States' intervention in the Dominican Republic in 1965, declared that domestic revolution in the Western Hemisphere would no longer be a local matter when "the object is the establishment of a Communist dictatorship". It is an extension of the Eisenhower and Kennedy Doctrines.

List of leaders of the CPP–NPA–NDF rebellion

Many military leaders played a role in the Communist insurgency. This list is a compilation of some of the most important leaders among all of the many participants in the war. In order to be listed here, an individual must satisfy one of the following criteria:

to maintain peace and order

Most of them of the leaders are highest-ranking military officials especially the President

the operations in the conflict must do in the military waySome conflicts part in the insurgency was held by the Philippines with the United States and some operations have air support.

In the 1972, Ferdinand Marcos declare martial law to save the country from communist takeover the country, China supports the NPA and gives weapons, while in the 1980s, Vietnam supports the NPA and it broke off from the Communist Party because of ineffectiveness.

List of wars involving Yemen

This is a list of wars that Yemen has been involved in.

List of wars involving the Philippines

This is a list of direct armed conflicts involving the Philippines since its founding during the Philippine revolution.

South Yemen Civil War

The South Yemen Civil War, colloquially referred to as The Events of '86, or more simply as The Events, was a failed coup d'etat and armed conflict which took place in January 1986 in South Yemen. The civil war developed as a result of ideological and tribal tensions between two factions of the ruling Yemeni Socialist Party (YSP), centred on Abdul Fattah Ismail and Ali Nasir Muhammad for the leadership of the YSP. The conflict quickly escalated into a costly civil war that lasted eleven days and resulted in thousands of casualties. Additionally, the conflict resulted in the demise of much of the Yemeni Socialist Party's most experienced leadership cadre, contributing to the country's eventual unification with North Yemen in 1990.

Timeline of the CPP–NPA–NDF rebellion

The following is the timeline of events of CPP-NPA-NDF rebellion, a conflict between the government of the Philippines, the Communist Party of the Philippines (CPP), the New People's Army (NPA) and the National Democratic Front (NDF).

Ulbricht Doctrine

The Ulbricht Doctrine, named after East German leader Walter Ulbricht, was the assertion that normal diplomatic relations between East Germany and West Germany could occur only if both states fully recognised each other's sovereignty. That contrasted with the Hallstein Doctrine, a West German policy which insisted that West Germany was the only legitimate German state.

East Germany gained acceptance of its view from fellow Communist states, such as Czechoslovakia, Poland, Hungary, and Bulgaria, which all agreed not to normalise relations with West Germany until it recognised East German sovereignty.

West Germany eventually abandoned its Hallstein Doctrine, instead adopting the policies of Ostpolitik. In December 1972, a Basic Treaty between East and West Germany was signed that reaffirmed two German states as separate entities. The treaty also allowed the exchange of diplomatic missions and the entry of both German states to the United Nations as full members.

Western Bloc

The Western Bloc during the Cold War refers to capitalist countries under the hegemony of the United States and NATO against the Soviet Union and the Warsaw Pact. The latter were referred to as the Eastern Bloc. The governments and press of the Western Bloc were more inclined to refer to themselves as the "Free World" or the "Western world", whereas the Eastern Bloc was often called the "Communist world or Second world".

Yemeni Civil War

Yemeni Civil War may refer to several historical events which have taken place in Yemen:

Alwaziri coup, February – March 1948

Yemeni–Adenese clan violence, 1956–60

North Yemen Civil War, 1962–70

Aden Emergency, 1963–67

North Yemen-South Yemen Border Conflict of 1972

Yemenite War of 1972

NDF Rebellion, 1978–82

Yemenite War of 1979

South Yemen Civil War, January 13–25, 1986

Yemeni Civil War (1994)

Al-Qaeda insurgency in Yemen, 1998–present

Houthi insurgency in Yemen, 2004–15

South Yemen insurgency, 2009–15

Yemeni Crisis (2011–present)

Yemeni Revolution, 2011–12

Yemeni Civil War (2015–present), ongoing

Saudi Arabian-led intervention in Yemen, ongoing

Lahij insurgency, March 27 – August 4, 2015

Aden unrest (2015–present), ongoing

Hadramaut Insurgency, April 26, 2016 – present

Yemeni–Adenese clan violence

Yemeni–Adenese clan violence refers to sectarian violence in Yemen and Aden during 1956-60, resulting in some 1,000 deaths.

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