NCAA Men's Division I Cross Country Championship

Each autumn since 1938, with the exception of 1943, the National Collegiate Athletic Association has hosted men's cross country championships. Since 1958, the NCAA has had multiple division championships. Since 1973, Divisions I, II and III have all had their own national championships. Teams and individual runners qualify for the championship at regional competitions approximately a week before the national championships, typically held in November.

Northern Arizona are the three-time defending men's team champions.

NCAA Men's Division I Cross Country Championship
Current season, competition or edition:
Current sports event 2018 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships
NCAA logo
SportCollege cross country running
Founded1938
No. of teams31 (253 individuals)
Most recent
champion(s)
Northern Arizona (3)
Most titlesTeam: Arkansas (11)
Individual: Washington State, Oregon (7)
Official websiteNCAA.com

Qualifying

Teams compete in one of nine regional championships to qualify, where the top two teams automatically advance and thirteen additional teams are chosen as at-large selections. In addition to the 31 teams, 38 individual runners qualify for the national championship.[1]

History

The field for the Division I national championship race has ranged in size from a low of 6 teams in 1938 to a high of 39 teams in 1970. From 1982 to 1997 the field was fixed at 22 teams. Beginning in 1998, the national championship race has included 31 teams.

The race distance from 1938 to 1964 was 4 miles (6.4 km). From 1965 to 1975 the race distance was 6 miles (9.7 km). Since 1976 the race distance has been 10,000 meters (6.2 mi).[2]

Champions

  • Prior to 1958, only a single national championship was held between all members of the NCAA; Division II started in 1958 and Division III in 1973.[3]
NCAA Men's Division I Cross Country Championship
Year Host City
(Host Team)
Team Championship Individual Championship
Winner Points Runner-up Points Winner
(Team)
Time
1938
Details
East Lansing, MI
(Michigan State)
Indiana 51 Notre Dame 61 Greg Rice
(Notre Dame)
20:12.9
1939
Details
Michigan State 54 Wisconsin 57 Walter Mehl
(Wisconsin)
20:30.9
1940
Details
Indiana 65 Eastern Michigan 68 Gil Dodds
(Ashland)
20:30.2
1941
Details
Rhode Island 83 Penn State 110 Fred Wilt
(Indiana)
20:32.1
1942
Details
Indiana
Penn State
57 Rhode Island 79 Oliver Hunter
(Notre Dame)
20:18.0
1943 Not Held due to World War II
1944
Details
East Lansing, MI
(Michigan State)
Drake 25 Notre Dame 64 Fred Feiler
(Drake)
21:04.2
1945
Details
Drake 50 Notre Dame 65 Fred Feiler
(Drake)
21:14.2
1946
Details
Drake 42 NYU 98 Quentin Brelsford
(Ohio Wesleyan)
20:22.9
1947
Details
Penn State 60 Syracuse 72 Jack Milne
(North Carolina)
20:41.1
1948
Details
Michigan State 41 Wisconsin 69 Robert Black
(Rhode Island)
19:52.3
1949
Details
Michigan State 59 Syracuse 81 Robert Black
(Rhode Island)
20:25.7
1950
Details
Penn State 53 Michigan State 55 Herb Semper
(Kansas)
20:31.7
1951
Details
Syracuse 80 Kansas 118 Herb Semper
(Kansas)
20:09.5
1952
Details
Michigan State 65 Indiana 68 Charles Capozzoli
(Georgetown)
19:36.7
1953
Details
Kansas 70 Indiana 82 Wes Santee
(Kansas)
19:43.5
1954
Details
Oklahoma State 61 Syracuse 118 Allen Frame
(Kansas)
19:54.2
1955
Details
Michigan State 46 Kansas 68 Charles Jones
(Iowa)
19:57.4
1956
Details
Michigan State 28 Kansas 88 Walter McNew
(Texas)
19:55.7
1957
Details
Notre Dame 121 Michigan State 127 Max Truex
(USC)
19:12.3
1958
Details
Michigan State 79 Western Michigan 104 Crawford Kennedy
(Michigan State)
20:07.1
1959
Details
Michigan State 44 Houston 120 Al Lawrence
(Houston)
20:35.7
1960
Details
Houston 54 Michigan State 80 Al Lawrence
(Houston)
19:28.2
1961
Details
Oregon State 68 San Jose State 82 Dale Story
(Oregon State)
19:46.6
1962
Details
San Jose State 58 Villanova 69 Tom O'Hara
(Loyola–Chicago)
19:20.3
1963
Details
San Jose State 53 Oregon 68 Victor Zwolak
(Villanova)
19:35.0
1964
Details
Western Michigan 86 Oregon 116 Elmore Banton
(Ohio)
20:07.5
The race distance changes from 4 miles to 6 miles
1965
Details
Lawrence, KS
(Kansas)
Western Michigan 81 Northwestern 114 John Lawson
(Kansas)
29:24.0
1966
Details
Villanova 79 Kansas State 155 Gerry Lindgren
(Washington State)
29:01.4
1967
Details
Laramie, WY
(Wyoming)
Villanova 91 Air Force 96 Gerry Lindgren
(Washington State)
30:45.6
1968
Details
Bronx, NY
(Manhattan)
Villanova 78 Stanford 100 Michael Ryan
(Air Force)
29:16.8
1969
Details
UTEP 74 Villanova 88 Gerry Lindgren
(Washington State)
28:59.2
1970
Details
Williamsburg, VA
(William & Mary)
Villanova 85 Oregon 86 Steve Prefontaine
(Oregon)
28:00.2
1971
Details
Knoxville, TN
(Tennessee)
Oregon 83 Washington State 122 Steve Prefontaine
(Oregon)
29:14.0
1972
Details
Houston, TX
(Houston)
Tennessee 134 East Tennessee State 148 Neil Cusack
(East Tennessee State)
28:23.0
1973
Details
Pullman, WA
(Washington State)
Oregon 89 UTEP 157 Steve Prefontaine
(Oregon)
28:14.8
1974
Details
Bloomington, IN
(Indiana)
Oregon 77 Western Kentucky 110 Nick Rose
(Western Kentucky)
29:22.00
1975
Details
State College, PA
(Penn State)
UTEP 88 Oregon 92 Craig Virgin
(Illinois)
28:23.3
*The race distance changes from 6 miles to 10 kilometers
1976
Details
Denton, TX
(North Texas)
UTEP 62 Oregon 117 Henry Rono
(Washington State)
28:06.6
1977
Details
Pullman, WA
(Washington State)
Oregon 100 UTEP 105 Henry Rono
(Washington State)
28:33.5
1978
Details
Madison, WI
(Wisconsin)
UTEP 56 Oregon 72 Alberto Salazar
(Oregon)
29:29.7
1979
Details
Bethlehem, PA
(Lehigh)
UTEP 86 Oregon 93 Henry Rono
(Washington State)
28:19.6
1980
Details
Wichita, KS
(Wichita State)
UTEP 58 Arkansas 152 Suleiman Nyambui
(UTEP)
29:04.0
1981
Details
Wichita, KS
(Wichita State)
UTEP 17 Providence 109 Matthews Motshwarateu
(UTEP)
28:45.6
1982
Details
Bloomington, IN
(Indiana)
Wisconsin 59 Providence 138 Mark Scrutton
(Colorado)
30:12.6
1983
Details
Bethlehem, PA
(Lehigh)
(Vacated) 108 Wisconsin 164 Zakarie Barie
(UTEP)
29:20.0
1984
Details
State College, PA
(Penn State)
Arkansas 101 Arizona 111 Ed Eyestone
(BYU)
29:28.8
1985
Details
Milwaukee, WI
(Marquette)
Wisconsin 67 Arkansas 104 Tim Hacker
(Wisconsin)
29:17.88
1986
Details
Tucson, AZ
(Arizona)
Arkansas 69 Dartmouth 141 Aaron Ramirez
(Arizona)
30:27.53
1987
Details
Charlottesville, VA
(Virginia)
Arkansas 87 Dartmouth 119 Joe Falcon
(Arkansas)
29:14.97
1988
Details
Ames, IA
(Iowa State)
Wisconsin 105 Northern Arizona 160 Bob Kennedy
(Indiana)
29:20.00
1989
Details
Annapolis, MD
(Navy)
Iowa State 54 Oregon 72 John Nuttall
(Iowa State)
29:30.55
1990
Details
Knoxville, TN
(Tennessee)
Arkansas 68 Iowa State 96 Jonah Koech
(Iowa State)
29:05
1991
Details
Tucson, AZ
(Arizona)
Arkansas 52 Iowa State 114 Sean Dollman
(Western Kentucky)
30:17.1
1992
Details
Bloomington, IN
(Indiana)
Arkansas 46 Wisconsin 87 Bob Kennedy
(Indiana)
30:15.3
1993
Details
Bethlehem, PA
(Lehigh)
Arkansas 31 BYU 153 Josephat Kapkory
(Washington State)
29:32.4
1994
Details
Fayetteville, AR
(Arkansas)
Iowa State 65 Colorado 88 Martin Keino
(Arizona)
30:08.7
1995
Details
Ames, IA
(Iowa State)
Arkansas 100 Northern Arizona 142 Godfrey Siamusiye
(Arkansas)
30:09
1996
Details
Tucson, AZ
(Arizona)
Stanford 46 Arkansas 74 Godfrey Siamusiye
(Arkansas)
29:49
1997
Details
Greenville, SC
(Furman)
Stanford 53 Arkansas 56 Mebrahtom Keflezighi
(UCLA)
28:54
1998
Details
Lawrence, KS
(Kansas)
Arkansas 97 Stanford 114 Adam Goucher
(Colorado)
29:26.9
1999
Details
Bloomington, IN
(Indiana)
Arkansas 58 Wisconsin 185 David Kimani
(South Alabama)
30:06.6
2000
Details
Ames, IA
(Iowa State)
Arkansas 83 Colorado 94 Keith Kelly
(Providence)
30:14.5
2001
Details
Greenville, SC
(Furman)
Colorado 90 Stanford 91 Boaz Cheboiywo
(Eastern Michigan)
28:47
2002
Details
Terre Haute, IN
(Indiana State)
Stanford 47 Wisconsin 107 Jorge Torres
(Colorado)
29:04.7
2003
Details
Cedar Rapids, IA
(Northern Iowa)
Stanford 24 Wisconsin 147 Dathan Ritzenhein
(Colorado)
29:14.1
2004
Details
Terre Haute, IN
(Indiana State)
Colorado 90 Wisconsin 94 Simon Bairu
(Wisconsin)
30:37.7
2005
Details
Wisconsin 37 Arkansas 105 Simon Bairu
(Wisconsin)
29:15.9
2006
Details
Colorado 94 Wisconsin 142 Josh Rohatinsky
(BYU)
30:44.9
2007
Details
Oregon 85 Iona 113 Josh McDougal
(Liberty)
29:22.4
2008
Details
Oregon 93 Iona 147 Galen Rupp
(Oregon)
29:03.2
2009
Details
Oklahoma State 127 Oregon 143 Sam Chelanga
(Liberty)
28:41.3
2010
Details
Oklahoma State 73 Florida State 193 Sam Chelanga
(Liberty)
29:22.2
2011
Details
Wisconsin 97 Oklahoma State 139 Lawi Lalang
(Arizona)
28:44.1
2012
Details
Louisville, KY
(Louisville)
Oklahoma State 72 Wisconsin 135 Kennedy Kithuka
(Texas Tech)
28:31.3
2013
Details
Terre Haute, IN
(Indiana State)
Colorado 149 Northern Arizona 169 Edward Cheserek
(Oregon)
29:41.1
2014
Details
Colorado 65 Stanford 98 Edward Cheserek
(Oregon)
30:19.4
2015
Details
Louisville, KY
(Louisville)
Syracuse 82 Colorado 91 Edward Cheserek
(Oregon)
28:45.8
2016
Details
Terre Haute, IN
(Indiana State)
Northern Arizona 125 Stanford 158 Patrick Tiernan
(Villanova)
29:22.0
2017
Details
Louisville, KY
(Louisville)
Northern Arizona 74 Portland 127 Justyn Knight
(Syracuse)
29:00.2
2018
Details
Madison, WI
(Wisconsin)
Northern Arizona 83 Brigham Young 116 Morgan McDonald
(Wisconsin)
29:08.3
2019
Details
Terre Haute, IN
(Indiana State)
2020
Details
Stillwater, OK
(Oklahoma State)
2021
Details
Tallahassee, FL
(Florida State)
  • A time highlighted in ██ indicates an NCAA championship record time for that distance at the time.
  • A † indicates the all-time NCAA championship record for that distance.
  • UTEP's 1983 championship was vacated by the NCAA Committee on Infractions.

Titles

Team titles

  • List updated through the 2018 Championships
Team Titles Year Won
Arkansas 11 1984, 1986, 1987, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1995, 1998, 1999, 2000
Michigan State 8 1939, 1948, 1949, 1952, 1955, 1956, 1958, 1959
UTEP 7 1969, 1975, 1976, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981
Oregon 6 1971, 1973, 1974, 1977, 2007, 2008
Colorado 5 2001, 2004, 2006, 2013, 2014
Wisconsin 5 1982, 1985, 1988, 2005, 2011
Oklahoma State 4 1954, 2009, 2010, 2012
Stanford 4 1996, 1997, 2002, 2003
Villanova 4 1966, 1967, 1968, 1970
Drake 3 1944, 1945, 1946
Indiana 3 1938, 1940, 1942
Penn State 3 1942, 1947, 1950
Northern Arizona 3 2016, 2017, 2018
Iowa State 2 1989, 1994
San Jose State 2 1962, 1963
Syracuse 2 1951, 2015
Western Michigan 2 1964, 1965
Oregon State 1 1961
Houston 1 1960
Notre Dame 1 1957
Kansas 1 1953
Rhode Island 1 1941

Individual titles

  • List updated through the 2017 Championships.
Rank Team Titles
1 Oregon 8
2 Washington State 7
3 Kansas 5
4 Colorado
Wisconsin
4
5 Arizona
Arkansas
Indiana
Liberty
UTEP
3
6 BYU
Drake
Houston
Iowa State
Notre Dame
Rhode Island
Villanova
Western Kentucky
2

Appearances

Most team appearances (top 15)

Rank Team Appearances
1 Wisconsin 54
2 Notre Dame 49
3 Arkansas
Colorado
44
4 Michigan State 42
5 Penn State
Providence
41
6 Oregon 39
7 Indiana 37
8 Georgetown 34
9 Tennessee
Texas
Villanova
32
10 BYU 31
11 Michigan 30
12 Kansas 29
13 Miami (OH)
Oklahoma State
28
14 NC State 26
15 William & Mary 25

Records

See also

References

  1. ^ "NCAA Championship Qualifying Criteria". U.S. Track & Field and Cross Country Coaches Association. Retrieved November 22, 2014.
  2. ^ NCAA 2010 Men's Division I Cross Country All Time Championship Records [1].
  3. ^ "NCAA Men's Division I Cross Country Championship" (PDF). NCAA. NCAA.org. pp. 3–4. Retrieved December 19, 2013.

External links

1992 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships

The 1992 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships were the 54th annual NCAA Men's Division I Cross Country Championship and the 12th annual NCAA Women's Division I Cross Country Championship to determine the team and individual national champions of NCAA Division I men's and women's collegiate cross country running in the United States. In all, four different titles were contested: men's and women's individual and team championships.Held on November 23, 1992, the combined meet was hosted by Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana. The distance for the men's race was 10 kilometers (6.21 miles) while the distance for the women's race was 5 kilometers (3.11 miles).

Both team national championships were retained by their respective defending champions: Arkansas for the men (their sixth overall and third consecutive) and Villanova for the women (their fourth overall and second consecutive). The two individual champions were Bob Kennedy (from Indiana) and Carole Zajac (from Villanova).

1993 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships

The 1993 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships were the 55th annual NCAA Men's Division I Cross Country Championship and the 13th annual NCAA Women's Division I Cross Country Championship to determine the team and individual national champions of NCAA Division I men's and women's collegiate cross country running in the United States. In all, four different titles were contested: men's and women's individual and team championships.Held on November 22, 1993, the combined meet was hosted by Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. The distance for the men's race was 10 kilometers (6.21 miles) while the distance for the women's race was 5 kilometers (3.11 miles).

Both team national championships were again retained by their respective defending champions: Arkansas for the men (their seventh overall and fourth consecutive) and Villanova for the women (their fifth overall and third consecutive). The two individual champions were Josephat Kapkory (Washington State, 39:32.4) and Carole Zajac (Villanova, 16:40.3); it was Zajac's second consecutive title as well.

1994 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships

The 1994 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships were the 56th annual NCAA Men's Division I Cross Country Championship and the 14th annual NCAA Women's Division I Cross Country Championship to determine the team and individual national champions of NCAA Division I men's and women's collegiate cross country running in the United States. In all, four different titles were contested: men's and women's individual and team championships.Held on November 21, 1994, the combined meet was hosted by the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville, Arkansas. The distance for the men's race was 10 kilometers (6.21 miles) while the distance for the women's race was 5 kilometers (3.11 miles).

The men's team championship was won by Iowa State, their second overall title and first since 1989. The women's team championship, however, was once again retained by Villanova, their sixth overall and fourth consecutive.

The two individual champions were Martin Keino (Arizona, 30:08.7) and Jennifer Rhines (Villanova, 16:31.2).

1995 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships

The 1995 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships were the 57th annual NCAA Men's Division I Cross Country Championship and the 15th annual NCAA Women's Division I Cross Country Championship to determine the team and individual national champions of NCAA Division I men's and women's collegiate cross country running in the United States. In all, four different titles were contested: men's and women's individual and team championships.Held on November 20, 1995, the combined meet was hosted by Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa. The distance for the men's race was 10 kilometers (6.21 miles) while the distance for the women's race was 5 kilometers (3.11 miles).

The men's team championship was won by Arkansas (100 points), their eighth overall title and first since winning four consecutive titles between 1990 and 1993. The women's team championship was won by Providence (88 points), their first.

The two individual champions were Godfrey Siamusiye (Arkansas, 30:09) and Kathy Butler (Wisconsin, 16:51).

1996 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships

The 1996 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships were the 58th annual NCAA Men's Division I Cross Country Championship and the 16th annual NCAA Women's Division I Cross Country Championship to determine the team and individual national champions of NCAA Division I men's and women's collegiate cross country running in the United States. In all, four different titles were contested: men's and women's individual and team championships.Held on November 25, 1996, the combined meet was hosted by the University of Arizona at Dell Urich Golf Course in Tucson, Arizona. The distance for the men's race was 10 kilometers (6.21 miles) while the distance for the women's race was 5 kilometers (3.11 miles).

The men's team championship was won by Stanford (46 points), their first. The women's team championship was also won by Stanford (101 points), also their first. This was the first time since 1985 (Wisconsin) that the same program won the men's and women's titles.

The two individual champions were, for the men, Godfrey Siamusiye (Arkansas, 29:49) and, for the women, Amy Skieresz (Arizona, 17:04). This was Siamusiye's second consecutive win.

1997 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships

The 1997 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships were the 59th annual NCAA Men's Division I Cross Country Championship and the 17th annual NCAA Women's Division I Cross Country Championship to determine the team and individual national champions of NCAA Division I men's and women's collegiate cross country running in the United States. In all, four different titles were contested: men's and women's individual and team championships.Held on November 24, 1997, the combined meet was hosted by Furman University in Greenville, South Carolina. The distance for the men's race was 10 kilometers (6.21 miles) while the distance for the women's race was 5 kilometers (3.11 miles).

The men's team championship was again won by Stanford (53 points), the Cardinal's second overall and second consecutive. The women's team championship was won by BYU (100 points), the Cougars' first.

The two individual champions were, for the men, Meb Keflezighi (UCLA, 28:54) and, for the women, Carrie Tollefson (Villanova, 16:29).

1998 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships

The 1998 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships were the 60th annual NCAA Men's Division I Cross Country Championship and the 18th annual NCAA Women's Division I Cross Country Championship to determine the team and individual national champions of NCAA Division I men's and women's collegiate cross country running in the United States. In all, four different titles were contested: men's and women's individual and team championships.Held on November 23, 1998, the combined meet was hosted by the University of Kansas at Rim Rock Farm in Lawrence, Kansas. The distance for the men's race was 10 kilometers (6.21 miles) while the distance for the women's race was 5 kilometers (3.11 miles).

The men's team championship was won by Arkansas (97 points), the Razorbacks' ninth overall. The women's team championship was won by Villanova (106 points), the Wildcats' seventh (and first since winning six consecutive between 1989 and 1994).

The two individual champions were, for the men, Adam Goucher (Colorado, 29:26) and, for the women, Katie McGregor (Michigan, 16:47).

1999 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships

The 1999 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships were the 61st annual NCAA Men's Division I Cross Country Championship and the 19th annual NCAA Women's Division I Cross Country Championship to determine the team and individual national champions of NCAA Division I men's and women's collegiate cross country running in the United States. In all, four different titles were contested: men's and women's individual and team championships.Held on November 22, 1999, the combined meet was hosted by Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana. The distance for the men's race was 10 kilometers (6.21 miles) while the distance for the women's race was 5 kilometers (3.11 miles).

The men's team championship was won by Arkansas (58 points), the Razorbacks' second consecutive and eighth overall. The women's team championship was won by BYU (72 points), the Cougars' second title (and second in three years).

The two individual champions were, for the men, David Kimani (South Alabama, 30:06.6) and, for the women, Erica Palmer (Wisconsin, 16:39.5).

2000 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships

The 2000 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships were the 62nd annual NCAA Men's Division I Cross Country Championship and the 20th annual NCAA Women's Division I Cross Country Championship to determine the team and individual national champions of NCAA Division I men's and women's collegiate cross country running in the United States. In all, four different titles were contested: men's and women's individual and team championships.Held on November 20, 2000, the combined meet was hosted by Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa. The distance for the men's race was 10 kilometers (6.21 miles) while the distance for the women's race was 6 kilometers (3.73 miles). This championship was one of the coldest on record with 20mph winds holding wind chills around 0 degrees Fahrenheit at race time.

The men's team championship was won by Arkansas (83 points), the Razorbacks' third consecutive and eleventh overall. The women's team championship was won by Colorado (117 points), the Buffaloes' first.

The two individual champions were, for the men, Keith Kelly (Providence, 30:14.5) and, for the women, Kara Grgas-Wheeler (Colorado, 20:30.5).

2002 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships

The 2002 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships were the 64th annual NCAA Men's Division I Cross Country Championship and the 22nd annual NCAA Women's Division I Cross Country Championship to determine the team and individual national champions of NCAA Division I men's and women's collegiate cross country running in the United States. In all, four different titles were contested: men's and women's individual and team championships.Held on November 25, 2002, the combined meet was hosted by Indiana State University at the LaVern Gibson Championship Cross Country Course in Terre Haute, Indiana. The distance for the men's race was 10 kilometers (6.21 miles) while the distance for the women's race was 6 kilometers (3.73 miles).

The men's team championship was won by Stanford (90 points), the Cardinal's third. The women's team championship was won by BYU (85 points), the Cougars' second consecutive, fourth overall, and fourth in six years.

The two individual champions were, for the men, Jorge Torres (Colorado, 29:04.7) and, for the women, Shalane Flanagan (North Carolina, 19:36.0).

2003 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships

The 2003 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships were the 65th annual NCAA Men's Division I Cross Country Championship and the 23rd annual NCAA Women's Division I Cross Country Championship to determine the team and individual national champions of NCAA Division I men's and women's collegiate cross country running in the United States. In all, four different titles were contested: men's and women's individual and team championships.Held on November 24, 2003, the combined meet was hosted by the University of Northern Iowa in Waterloo, Iowa, near UNI's campus in Cedar Falls. The distance for the men's race was 10 kilometers (6.21 miles) while the distance for the women's race was 6 kilometers (3.73 miles).

The men's team championship was again won by Stanford (24 points), the Cardinal's second consecutive and fourth overall. This was the second best score in NCAA history and the lowest by a team of entirely American runners. UTEP's 17 point win in 1981 was accomplished with a team of African runners. Stanford placed 6 runners in the top 13 places. The women's team championship was also won by Stanford (120 points), the Cardinal's second and first since 1996. This was the third time that the same university won both team titles; Stanford accomplished this feat in 1996 and Wisconsin captured both in 1985.

The two individual champions were, for the men, Dathan Ritzenhein (Colorado, 29:14.1) and, for the women, Shalane Flanagan (North Carolina, 19:30.4). It was Flanagan's second consecutive title.

2004 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships

The 2004 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships were the 66th annual NCAA Men's Division I Cross Country Championship and the 24th annual NCAA Women's Division I Cross Country Championship to determine the team and individual national champions of NCAA Division I men's and women's collegiate cross country running in the United States. In all, four different titles were contested: men's and women's individual and team championships.Held on November 22, 2004, the combined meet was the first of eight consecutive championship meets hosted by Indiana State University at the LaVern Gibson Championship Cross Country Course in Terre Haute, Indiana. The distance for the men's race was 10 kilometers (6.21 miles) while the distance for the women's race was 6 kilometers (3.73 miles).

The men's team championship was won by Colorado (90 points), the Buffaloes' second. The women's team championship was also won by Colorado (63 points), the Buffaloes' second. This was the fourth time that the same program won both the men's and women's national team titles (Stanford, 2003; Stanford, 1996; Wisconsin, 1985).

The two individual champions were, for the men, Simon Bairu (Wisconsin, 30:37.7) and, for the women, Kim Smith (Providence, 20:28.5).

2005 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships

The 2005 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships were the 67th annual NCAA Men's Division I Cross Country Championship and the 25th annual NCAA Women's Division I Cross Country Championship to determine the team and individual national champions of NCAA Division I men's and women's collegiate cross country running in the United States. In all, four different titles were contested: men's and women's individual and team championships.Held on November 21, 2005, the combined meet was the second of eight consecutive meets hosted by Indiana State University at the LaVern Gibson Championship Cross Country Course in Terre Haute, Indiana. The distance for the men's race was 10 kilometers (6.2 miles) while the distance for the women's race was 6 kilometers (3.7 miles).

The men's team championship was won by Wisconsin (37 points), the Badgers' fourth. The women's team championship was won by Stanford (146 points), the Cardinal's third (and second in three years).

The two individual champions were, for the men, Simon Bairu (Wisconsin, 29:15.9) and, for the women, Johanna Nilsson (Northern Arizona, 19:33.9). It was the second consecutive title for Bairu.

2007 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships

The 2007 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships were the 69th annual NCAA Men's Division I Cross Country Championship and the 27th annual NCAA Women's Division I Cross Country Championship to determine the team and individual national champions of NCAA Division I men's and women's collegiate cross country running in the United States. In all, four different titles were contested: men's and women's individual and team championships.Held on November 19, 2007, the combined meet was the fourth of eight consecutive meets hosted by Indiana State University at the LaVern Gibson Championship Cross Country Course in Terre Haute, Indiana. The distance for the men's race was 10 kilometers (6.21 miles) while the distance for the women's race was 6 kilometers (3.73 miles).

The men's team championship was won by Oregon (85 points), the Ducks' fifth (and first since 1977). The women's team championship was again won by Stanford (195 points), the Cardinal's fourth overall, second consecutive, and third in four years.

The two individual champions were, for the men, Josh McDougal (Liberty, 29:22.4) and, for the women, Sally Kipyego (Texas Tech, 19:30.9).

2008 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships

The 2008 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships were the 70th annual NCAA Men's Division I Cross Country Championship and the 28th annual NCAA Women's Division I Cross Country Championship to determine the team and individual national champions of NCAA Division I men's and women's collegiate cross country running in the United States. In all, four different titles were contested: men's and women's individual and team championships.Held on November 24, 2008, the combined meet was the fifth of eight consecutive meets hosted by Indiana State University at the LaVern Gibson Championship Cross Country Course in Terre Haute, Indiana. The distance for the men's race was 10 kilometers (6.21 miles) while the distance for the women's race was 6 kilometers (3.73 miles).

The men's team championship was again won by Oregon (93 points), the Ducks' second consecutive and sixth overall. The women's team championship was won by Washington (79 points), the Huskies' first.

The two individual champions were, for the men, Galen Rupp (Oregon, 29:03.2) and, for the women, Sally Kipyego (Texas Tech, 19:28.1). It was Kipyego's record third consecutive title.

2009 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships

The 2009 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships were the 71st annual NCAA Men's Division I Cross Country Championship and the 29th annual NCAA Women's Division I Cross Country Championship to determine the team and individual national champions of NCAA Division I men's and women's collegiate cross country running in the United States. In all, four different titles were contested: men's and women's individual and team championships.Held on November 23, 2009, the combined meet was the sixth of eight consecutive meets hosted by Indiana State University at the LaVern Gibson Championship Cross Country Course in Terre Haute, Indiana. The distance for the men's race was 10 kilometers (6.21 miles) while the distance for the women's race was 6 kilometers (3.73 miles).

The men's team championship was won by Oklahoma State (127 points), the Cowboys' second overall and first since 1954. The women's team championship was won by Villanova (79 points), the Wildcats' eighth overall and first since 1998.

The two individual champions were, for the men, Samuel Chelanga (Liberty, 28:41.3) and, for the women, Angela Bizzarri (Illinois, 19:46.8).

2010 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships

The 2010 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships were the 72nd annual NCAA Men's Division I Cross Country Championship and the 30th annual NCAA Women's Division I Cross Country Championship to determine the team and individual national champions of NCAA Division I men's and women's collegiate cross country running in the United States. In all, four different titles were contested: men's and women's individual and team championships.Held on November 22, 2010, the combined meet was the seventh of eight consecutive meets hosted by Indiana State University at the LaVern Gibson Championship Cross Country Course in Terre Haute, Indiana. The distance for the men's race was 10 kilometers (6.21 miles) while the distance for the women's race was 6 kilometers (3.73 miles).

The men's team championship was again won by Oklahoma State (73 points), the Cowboys' second consecutive and third overall. The women's team championship was again won by Villanova (120 points), the Wildcats' second consecutive and ninth overall.

The two individual champions were, for the men, Samuel Chelanga (Liberty, 29:22.2) and, for the women, Sheila Reid (Villanova, 20:06.9).

2011 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships

The 2011 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships were the 73rd annual NCAA Men's Division I Cross Country Championship and the 31st annual NCAA Women's Division I Cross Country Championship to determine the team and individual national champions of NCAA Division I men's and women's collegiate cross country running in the United States. In all, four different titles were contested: men's and women's individual and team championships.Held on November 21, 2011, the combined meet was the eighth of eight consecutive meets hosted by Indiana State University at the LaVern Gibson Championship Cross Country Course in Terre Haute, Indiana. The distance for the men's race was 10 kilometers (6.21 miles) while the distance for the women's race was 6 kilometers (3.73 miles).

The men's team championship was won by Wisconsin (97 points), the Badgers' fifth overall and first since 2005. The women's team championship was won by Georgetown (162 points), the Hoyas' first.

The two individual champions were, for the men, Lawi Lalang (Arizona, 28:44.1) and, for the women, Sheila Reid (Villanova, 19:41.2); it was her second consecutive title.

2013 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships

The 2013 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships were the 75th NCAA Men's Division I Cross Country Championship and the 33rd NCAA Women's Division I Cross Country Championship held at the LaVern Gibson Cross Country Course in Terre Haute, Indiana near the campus of Indiana State University on November 23, 2013. Four different cross country running championships were contested: men's and women's individual and team championships.On the men's side, the team national championship was won by the Colorado Buffaloes, their fourth title, while the individual championship was won by Edward Cheserek from Oregon. On the women's side, the team championship was won by the Providence Friars, their second title, and the individual championship was won by Abbey D'Agostino of Dartmouth.

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