NCAA Men's Division III Cross Country Championship

The NCAA Men's Division III Cross Country Championship is an annual cross country meet to decide the team and individual national champions of men's NCAA Division III intercollegiate cross country running in the United States. It has been held every fall, usually in November, since the NCAA split into its current three-division format in 1973.

The current champions are the North Central Cardinals, who won their 19th national title in 2018.

NCAA Men's Division III Cross Country Championship
NCAA logo
SportCross country
Founded1973
Most recent
champion(s)
North Central (IL) (18)
Official websiteNCAA.com

Format

The field for the national championship race varied in the early years, reaching a high of 52 teams in 1977. From 1982 to 1998 the field was fixed at 21 teams. From 1999 to 2005 the field included 24 teams. Beginning in 2006, the national championship race has included 32 teams. Teams compete in one of eight regional championships to qualify. In addition to the 32 teams, 56 individual runners qualify for the national championship.

The race distance from 1973 to 1975 was 5 miles (8,046 meters). Since 1976 the race distance has been 8,000 meters (4.97 miles).

Champions

NCAA Division III Men's Cross Country Championship
Year Finals Site
(Host)
Team Championship Individual Championship
Winner Points Runner-up Points Winner
(Team)
Time
1973 Wheaton, IL
(Wheaton)
Ashland 66 Albany (NY) 172 Steve Foster
(Ashland)
24:27
1974 Mount Union 105 Occidental 148 David Moller
(Rochester–NY)
24:39.
1975 Waltham, MA
(Brandeis)
North Central (IL) 91 Occidental 111 Vin Fleming
(Lowell)
24:27
The race distance changes from 5 miles to 8,000 meters
1976 Cleveland, OH
(Case)
North Central (IL) (2) 109 Humboldt State 132 Dale Kramer
(Carleton)
24:56†
1977 Occidental 149 Humboldt State 152 25:44
1978 Rock Island, IL
(Augustana–IL)
North Central (IL) (3) 60 Luther 151 Dan Henderson
(Wheaton–IL)
23:54†
1979 North Central (IL) (4) 85 Humboldt State 93 Steve Hunt
(UMass Boston)
24:12.1
1980 Rochester, NY
(Rochester)
Carleton 121 Augustana (IL) 125 Jeff Milliman
(North Central–IL)
25:20.2
1981 Kenosha, WI
(Carthage)
North Central (IL) (5) 89 Brandeis 107 Mark Whalley
(Principia)
25:25
1982 Fredonia, NY
(Fredonia)
North Central (IL) (6) 51 Brandeis 89 Nicholas Manciu
(St. Thomas–MN)
26:06
1983 Newport News, VA
(Christopher Newport)
Brandeis 52 North Central (IL) 89 Tony Bluell
(North Central–IL)
23:46†
1984 Delaware, OH
(Ohio Wesleyan)
St. Thomas (MN) 52 North Central (IL) 89 Mark Beeman
(Brandeis)
24:44.71
1985 Atlanta, GA
(Emory)
Luther 98 North Central (IL) 150 James White
(UMass Dartmouth)
25:35
1986 Fredonia, NY
(Fredonia)
St. Thomas (MN) 51 UW–La Crosse 72 Arnie Schraeder
(UW–Stevens Point)
26:47
1987 Holland, MI
(Hope)
North Central (IL) (7) 67 UW–La Crosse 78 Jukka Tammisuo
(St. Lawrence)
24:19.3
1988 St. Louis, MO
(Washington)
UW–Oshkosh 66 North Central (IL) 75 David Terronez
(Augustana–IL)
24:43.2
1989 Rock Island, IL
(Augustana–IL)
UW–Oshkosh 55 North Central (IL) 118 23:58
1990 Grinnell, IA
(Grinnell)
UW–Oshkosh 87 North Central (IL) 100 Seamus McElligott
(Haverford)
24:46.61
1991 Newport News, VA
(Christopher Newport)
Rochester (NY) 139 North Central (IL) 147 Sandu Rebenciuc
(Augustana–IL)
24:26
1992 Schenectady, NY
(Union)
North Central (IL) (8) 107 Rochester (NY) 114 Gary Wasserman
(Nebraska Wesleyan)
24:50.4
1993 Grinnell, IA
(Grinnell)
North Central (IL) (9) 32 UW–La Crosse 123 Dan Mayer
(North Central–IL)
24:29.8
1994 Bethlehem, PA
(Moravian)
Williams 98 North Central (IL) 110 Jeremie Perry
(Williams)
24:41.8
1995 La Crosse, WI
(UW–La Crosse)
Williams 83 North Central (IL) 91 John Weigel
(North Central–IL)
23:57.5
1996 Rock Island, IL
(Augustana–IL)
UW–La Crosse 86 North Central (IL) 94 Matt Brill
(North Central–IL)
23:57
1997 Cambridge, MA
(MIT)
North Central (IL) (10) 94 Mount Union 96 Brett Altergott
(UW–La Crosse)
25:06
1998 Carlisle, PA
(Dickinson)
North Central (IL) (11) 106 Calvin 122 Erik Dieckman
(North Central–IL)
24:58.27
1999 Oshkosh, WI
(UW–Oshkosh)
North Central (IL) (12) 84 Keene State 100 Dave Davis
(Puget Sound)
23:42.3†
2000 Spokane, WA
(Whitworth)
Calvin 65 Keene State 87 Tim McCoskey
(North Central–IL)
24:47.8
2001 Rock Island, IL
(Augustana–IL)
UW–La Crosse 80 Calvin 140 J.B. Haglund
(Haverford)
24:16
2002 Northfield, MN
(St. Olaf)
UW–Oshkosh 66 Calvin 122 Ryan Bak
(Trinity–CT)
25:01.1
2003 Hanover, IN
(Hanover)
Calvin (2) 48 UW–Stevens Point 128 Josh Moen
(Wartburg)
24:34.4
2004 Eau Claire, WI
(UW–Eau Claire)
Calvin (3) 107 North Central (IL) 137 24:28.7
2005 Delaware, OH
(Ohio Wesleyan)
UW–La Crosse 94 Calvin 117 Neal Holtschulte
(Williams)
25:13.8
2006 Wilmington, OH
(Wilmington)
Calvin (4) 37 NYU 92 Macharia Yuot
(Widener)
26:31
2007 Northfield, MN
(St. Olaf)
NYU 128 Haverford 150 Tyler Sigl
(UW–Platteville)
24:24
2008 Hanover, IN
(Hanover)
SUNY Cortland 80 North Central (IL) 115 Peter Kosgei
(Hamilton)
24:22.03
2009 Berea, OH
(Baldwin Wallace)
North Central (IL) (13) 50 Williams 181 Ricky Flynn
(Lynchburg)
25:09.8
2010 Waverly, IA
(Wartburg)
Haverford 87 North Central (IL) 104 Anders Hulleberg
(Haverford)
24:22.2
2011 Winneconne, WI
(UW–Oshkosh)
North Central (IL) (14) 110 Haverford 172 Ben Sathre
(St. Thomas–MN)
23:44.27
2012 Terre Haute, IN
(Rose-Hulman)
North Central (IL) (15) 167 Calvin
Haverford
188 Tim Nelson
(UW–Stout)
24:26.8
2013 Hanover, IN
(Hanover)
St. Olaf 84 North Central (IL) 86 Michael LeDuc
(Connecticut College)
24:29.3
2014 Wilmington, OH
(Wilmington)
North Central (IL) (16) 130 St. Olaf 143 Grant Wintheiser
(St. Olaf)
23:44.9
2015 Winneconne, WI
(UW-Oshkosh)
UW–Eau Claire 135 Williams 144 Ian LaMere
(UW–Platteville)
23:35.4
2016 Louisville, KY North Central (Ill.) (17) 60 SUNY Geneseo 204 Ian LeMere
(UW–Platteville)
23:40.4
2017 Elsah, IL
(Principia)
North Central (Ill.) (18) 57 UW–La Crosse 196 Darin Lau
(UW–Eau Claire)
24:03.59
2018 Winneconne, WI
(UW-Oshkosh)
North Central (Ill.) (19) 43 Washington (Mo.) (18) 110 Dhruvil Patel
(North Central-IL)
24:24.5

† indicates a then-NCAA record-setting time for that particular distance.

A time highlighted in ██ indicates the all-time NCAA championship record for that distance.

Source: [1]

Team titles

Rank Team Titles Years
1 North Central (IL) 19 1975, 1976, 1978, 1979, 1981, 1982, 1987, 1992, 1993, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2009, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2016, 2017, 2018
2 Calvin 4 2000, 2003, 2004, 2006
Wisconsin–Oshkosh 1988, 1989, 1990, 2002
3 Wisconsin–La Crosse 3 1996, 2001, 2005
4 Williams 2 1994, 1995
St. Thomas (MN) 1984, 1986
5 Wisconsin-Eau Claire 1 2015
St. Olaf 2013
Haverford 2010
SUNY Cortland 2008
NYU 2007
Rochester (NY) 1991
Luther 1985
Brandeis 1983
Carleton 1980
Occidental 1977
Mount Union 1974
Ashland 1973

Source: [2]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Division III Men's Cross Country Championships Record Book" (PDF). NCAA.
  2. ^ "Men's Cross Country Championship History". NCAA.

External links

1973 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships

The 1973 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships were the 35th annual cross country meet to determine the team and individual national champions of NCAA Division I men's collegiate cross country running in the United States. Held on November 19, it was hosted by Washington State University at Hangman Valley Golf Course, near Spokane, Washington.The distance for this race was 6 miles (9.66 km), and the approximate average elevation was 1,900 feet (580 m) above sea level. The temperature during the race was 38 °F (3 °C).

The team national championship was won by the Oregon Ducks, their second title.The individual championship was won by Oregon's Steve Prefontaine, with a time of 28:14.80. This was Prefontaine's third individual title in four years. Along with Gerry Lindgren (1966, 1967, and 1969) and Henry Rono (1976, 1977, and 1979), both from Washington State, Prefontaine is one of only three Division I collegiate runners with three individual titles. Washington State hosted the championship again four years later in 1977, also at Hangman Valley, south of the city.

1974 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships

The 1974 NCAA Division I Men's Cross Country Championships were the 36th annual cross country meet to determine the team and individual national champions of NCAA Division I men's collegiate cross country running in the United States. Held on November 26, 1974, the meet was hosted by Indiana University at the IU Cross Country Course in Bloomington, Indiana. The distance for this race was 6 miles (9.7 kilometers).

All Division I members were eligible to qualify for the meet. In total, 28 teams and 250 individual runners contested this championship.The team national championship was retained by the Oregon Ducks, their third overall, and second consecutive, title. The individual championship was won by Nick Rose, from Western Kentucky, with a time of 29:22.00.

1975 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships

The 1975 NCAA Division I Men's Cross Country Championships were the 37th annual cross country meet to determine the team and individual national champions of NCAA Division I men's collegiate cross country running in the United States. Held on November 24, 1975, the meet was hosted by Penn State University at the Penn State Golf Courses in State College, Pennsylvania. The distance for this race was 6 miles (9.7 kilometers). This was the final national meet at this distance.

All Division I members were eligible to qualify for the meet. In total, 32 teams and 268 individual runners contested this championship.The team national championship was won by the UTEP Miners, their second title. The individual championship was won by Craig Virgin, from Illinois, with a time of 28:23.30.

1976 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships

The 1976 NCAA Division I Men's Cross Country Championships were the 38th annual cross country meet to determine the team and individual national champions of NCAA Division I men's collegiate cross country running in the United States. Held on November 22, 1976, the meet was hosted by North Texas State University at the NTSU Cross Country Course in Denton, Texas. The distance for this race was 10 kilometers (6.21 miles).

All Division I members were eligible to qualify for the meet. In total, 34 teams and 298 individual runners contested this championship.The team national championship was retained by the UTEP Miners, their third title. The individual championship was won by Henry Rono, from Washington State, with a meet distance record time of 28:06.60. As of the 2016 championships, Rono's record time has yet to be surpassed during a national NCAA meet despite being recorded during the first ever NCAA championship at the 10 kilometer distance.

1977 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships

The 1977 NCAA Division I Men's Cross Country Championships were the 39th annual cross country meet to determine the team and individual national champions of NCAA Division I men's collegiate cross country running in the United States. Held on November 21, it was hosted by Washington State University at Hangman Valley Golf Course, near Spokane, Washington.Washington State previously hosted four years earlier in 1973, also at Hangman Valley, south of the city. The distance for this race was 10 kilometers (6.21 miles) and the approximate average elevation was 1,900 feet (580 m) above sea level.

All Division I cross country teams were eligible to qualify for the meet through their placement at various regional qualifying meets. In total, 29 teams and 255 individual runners contested this championship.The team national championship was won by the Oregon Ducks, their fourth title. The individual championship was retained by Henry Rono, from Washington State, with a time of 28:33.50. This was Rono's second individual title; he would go on to win again in 1979.

1978 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships

The 1978 NCAA Division I Men's Cross Country Championships were the 40th annual cross country meet to determine the team and individual national champions of NCAA Division I men's collegiate cross country running in the United States. Held on November 20, 1978, the meet was hosted by the University of Wisconsin–Madison at the Yahara Hills Golf Course in Madison, Wisconsin. The distance for this race was 10 kilometers (6.21 miles).

All Division I cross country teams were eligible to qualify for the meet through their placement at various regional qualifying meets. In total, 29 teams and 241 individual runners contested this championship.The team national championship was won by the UTEP Miners, their fourth title. The individual championship was won by Alberto Salazar, from Oregon, with a time of 29:29.70.

1979 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships

The 1979 NCAA Division I Men's Cross Country Championships were the 41st annual cross country meet to determine the team and individual national champions of NCAA Division I men's collegiate cross country running in the United States. Held on November 19, 1979, the meet was hosted by Lehigh University at the Saucon Valley Fields in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. The distance for this race was 10 kilometers (6.21 miles).

All Division I cross country teams were eligible to qualify for the meet through their placement at various regional qualifying meets. In total, 29 teams and 237 individual runners contested this championship.The team national championship was retained by the UTEP Miners, their fifth title. The individual championship was won by Henry Rono, from Washington State, with a time of 28:19.60. This was Rono's third individual title in four years. Along with Gerry Lindgren (1966, 1967, and 1969) and Steve Prefontaine (1970, 1971, and 1973), the former from Washington State and the latter from Oregon, Rono is one of only three Division I collegiate runners with three individual titles.

1980 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships

The 1980 NCAA Division I Men's Cross Country Championships were the 42nd annual cross country meet to determine the team and individual national champions of NCAA Division I men's collegiate cross country running in the United States. Held on November 24, 1980, the meet was hosted by Wichita State University at the Echo Hills Golf Course in Park City, Kansas. The distance for this race was 10 kilometers (6.21 miles).

This was the final year of a singular men's championship. Starting in 1981, the NCAA Women's Division I Cross Country Championship was added and held at the same site as the men's championship each subsequent year.

All Division I cross country teams were eligible to qualify for the meet through their placement at various regional qualifying meets. In total, 29 teams and 243 individual runners contested this championship.The team national championship was retained again by the UTEP Miners, their sixth, and third consecutive, overall title. The individual championship was won by Suleiman Nyambui, also from UTEP, with a time of 20:04.00.

1982 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships

The 1982 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships were the 44th annual NCAA Men's Division I Cross Country Championship and the 2nd annual NCAA Women's Division I Cross Country Championship to determine the team and individual national champions of NCAA Division I men's and women's collegiate cross country running in the United States. In all, four different titles were contested: men's and women's individual and team championships.

Held on November 22, 1982, the combined meet was hosted by Indiana University at the IU Championship Cross Country Course in Bloomington, Indiana. The distance for the men's race was 10 kilometers (6.21 miles) while the distance for the women's race was 5 kilometers (3.11 miles).

The men's team national championship was retained again by Wisconsin Badgers, their first overall title. The individual championship was won by English runner Mark Scrutton, from Colorado, with a time of 30:12.60.The women's team national championship was again won by the Virginia Cavaliers, their second. The individual championship was won by Lesley Welch, also from Virginia, with a time of 16:39.7.

1983 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships

The 1983 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships were the 45th annual NCAA Men's Division I Cross Country Championship and the 3rd annual NCAA Women's Division I Cross Country Championship to determine the team and individual national champions of NCAA Division I men's and women's collegiate cross country running in the United States. In all, four different titles were contested: men's and women's individual and team championships.

Held on November 21, 1983, the combined meet was hosted by Lehigh University at the Saucon Valley Fields in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. The distance for the men's race was 10 kilometers (6.21 miles) while the distance for the women's race was 5 kilometers (3.11 miles).

The men's team national championship was won by UTEP, but the Miners' performance was later vacated by the NCAA. The individual championship was won by Zakarie Barie, also from UTEP, with a time of 29:20.0.The women's team national championship was won by Oregon, their first. The individual championship was won by Betty Jo Springs, from NC State, with a time of 16:30.7. This was Springs' second championship after winning the inaugural race in 1981.

1984 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships

The 1984 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships were the 46th annual NCAA Men's Division I Cross Country Championship and the 4th annual NCAA Women's Division I Cross Country Championship to determine the team and individual national champions of NCAA Division I men's and women's collegiate cross country running in the United States. In all, four different titles were contested: men's and women's individual and team championships.

Held on November 19, 1984, the combined meet was hosted by Penn State University at the Penn State Golf Courses in State College, Pennsylvania. The distance for the men's race was 10 kilometers (6.21 miles) while the distance for the women's race was 5 kilometers (3.11 miles).

The men's team national championship was won by Arkansas, their first national title. The individual championship was won by Ed Eyestone, from BYU, with a time of 29:28.8.The women's team national championship was won by Wisconsin, their first national title. The individual championship was won by Cathy Branta, from Wisconsin, with a time of 16:15.6.

2015 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships

The 2015 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships were the 77th NCAA Men's Division I Cross Country Championship and the 35th NCAA Women's Division I Cross Country Championship to determine the national champions of men's and women's NCAA Division I collegiate cross country running. It was held at E. P. "Tom" Sawyer State Park in Louisville, Kentucky and was hosted by the University of Louisville on November 21, 2015. Four different championships were contested: men's and women's individual and team championships.

Syracuse won the men's team championship, their first since 1951. Oregon's Edward Cheserek won the men's individual event, his third consecutive championship. Cheserek joined Gerry Lindgren, Steve Prefontaine, and Henry Rono as the event's only three-time champions.

New Mexico won the women's team championship, their first. It was UNM's first women's team national championship in any sport. Notre Dame's Molly Seidel won the individual event.

2016 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships

The 2016 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships were the 78th NCAA Men's Division I Cross Country Championship and the 36th NCAA Women's Division I Cross Country Championship to determine the national champions of men's and women's NCAA Division I collegiate cross country running. They were hosted by Indiana State University at the LaVern Gibson Cross Country Course in Terre Haute, Indiana on November 19, 2016. Four different championships will be contested: men's and women's individual and team championships.

2017 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships

The 2017 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships was the 79th annual NCAA Men's Division I Cross Country Championship and the 37th annual NCAA Women's Division I Cross Country Championship to determine the team and individual national champions of NCAA Division I men's and women's collegiate cross country running in the United States. In all, four different titles will be contested: men's and women's individual and team championships.Held on November 18, 2017, the combined meet was hosted by the University of Louisville at E. P. "Tom" Sawyer State Park in Louisville, Kentucky. The distance for the men's race was 10 kilometers (6.21 miles) while the distance for the women's race was 6 kilometers (3.73 miles).

2018 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships

The 2018 NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships was the 80th annual NCAA Men's Division I Cross Country Championship and the 38th annual NCAA Women's Division I Cross Country Championship to determine the team and individual national champions of NCAA Division I men's and women's collegiate cross country running in the United States. In all, four different titles were contested: men's and women's individual and team championships.

NCAA Cross Country Championship

NCAA Cross Country Championship may refer to several annual competitions in cross country running organised by the National Collegiate Athletic Association:

NCAA Men's Division I Cross Country Championship

NCAA Men's Division II Cross Country Championship

NCAA Men's Division III Cross Country Championship

NCAA Women's Division I Cross Country Championship

NCAA Women's Division II Cross Country Championship

NCAA Women's Division III Cross Country Championship

NCAA Men's Division II Cross Country Championship

The NCAA Men's Division II Cross Country Championship is an annual cross country meet to decide the team and individual national champions of men's intercollegiate cross country running in the United States. It has been held every fall, usually in November, since breaking off from the NCAA University Division Men's Cross Country Championships in 1958.

Known as the NCAA College Division Men's Cross Country Championship until 1973, it was created for cross country programs from smaller universities and colleges. A third championship, the NCAA Men's Division III Cross Country Championship, split away in 1973 when the NCAA created its current three-division structure.

The defending national teams champions are the Grand Valley State Lakers, who won their first national title in 2018. Colorado Mines' Marcelo Laguera is the reigning individual champion, with a time of 31:46.6.

Shem-Tov Sabag

Shem-Tov Sabag (שם טוב סבג; nicknamed "Shemi"; born April 13, 1959) is an Israeli former Olympic marathoner. He won both the 1984 Lake County Marathon and the 1989 Vancouver Marathon.

University of Mount Union

The University of Mount Union is a private university in Alliance, Ohio. Founded in 1846, the university was affiliated with the Methodist Church until the spring of 2019. Mount Union has an enrollment of 2,209 undergraduate students, divided approximately equally between men and women.

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