NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship

The annual NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship tournament has determined the top women's lacrosse team in the NCAA Division I since 1982.

James Madison is the champion, having defeated Boston College in the 2018 NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship final.

NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship
Current season, competition or edition:
Current sports event 2018 NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship
SportWomen's college lacrosse
Founded1982
No. of teams26
CountryUnited States
Most recent
champion(s)
James Madison (1)
TV partner(s)ESPNU
Official websiteNCAA.com

History

Lacrosse was one of twelve women's sports added to the NCAA championship program for the 1981-82 school year, as the NCAA engaged in battle with the AIAW for sole governance of women's collegiate sports. The AIAW continued to conduct its established championship program in the same twelve (and other) sports; however, after a year of dual women's championships, the AIAW held its last championship in 1982 and ceased operation.

Separate championships are held for Division II, founded in 2001, and Division III, founded in 1985.[1]

Results

See Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women Champions for the women's lacrosse champions from 1978 to 1982. NOTE: In 1982 there were both NCAA and AIAW Division I champions.

NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship
Year Site
(Host Team)
Host Stadium Final
Winner Score Runner-up
1982
Details
Trenton, NJ
(Trenton State)
Lions Stadium Massachusetts 9–6 Trenton State
1983
Details
Philadelphia, PA
(Penn)
Franklin Field Delaware 10–7 Temple
1984
Details
Boston, MA
(Boston U.)
Nickerson Field Temple 6–4 Maryland
1985
Details
Philadelphia, PA
(Penn)
Franklin Field New Hampshire 6–5 Maryland
1986
Details
College Park, MD
(Maryland)
Byrd Stadium Maryland 6–5 Penn State
1987
Details
College Park, MD
(Maryland)
Byrd Stadium Penn State 7–6 Temple
1988
Details
Haverford, PA
(Haverford)
Walton Field Temple 15–7 Penn State
1989
Details
West Chester, PA
(West Chester)
John A. Farrell Stadium Penn State 7–6 Harvard
1990
Details
Princeton, NJ
(Princeton)
Palmer Stadium Harvard 8–7 Maryland
1991
Details
Trenton, NJ
(Trenton State)
Lions Stadium Virginia 8–6 Maryland
1992
Details
Bethlehem, PA
(Lehigh)
Goodman Stadium Maryland 11–10
(OT)
Harvard
1993
Details
College Park, MD
(Maryland)
Byrd Stadium Virginia 8–6
(OT)
Princeton
1994
Details
College Park, MD
(Maryland)
Byrd Stadium Princeton 10–7 Maryland
1995
Details
Trenton, NJ
(Trenton State)
Lions Stadium Maryland 13–5 Princeton
1996
Details
Bethlehem, PA
(Lehigh)
Goodman Stadium Maryland 10–5 Virginia
1997
Details
Bethlehem, PA
(Lehigh)
Goodman Stadium Maryland 8–7 Loyola (MD)
1998
Details
Catonsville, MD
(UMBC)
UMBC Stadium Maryland 11–5 Virginia
1999
Details
Baltimore, MD
(Johns Hopkins)
Homewood Field Maryland 16–6 Virginia
2000
Details
Trenton, NJ
(TCNJ)
Lions Stadium Maryland 16–8 Princeton
2001
Details
Baltimore, MD
(Johns Hopkins)
Homewood Field Maryland 14–13
(3OT)
Georgetown
2002
Details
Baltimore, MD
(Loyola)
Diane Geppi-Aikens Field Princeton 12–7 Georgetown
2003
Details
Syracuse, NY
(Syracuse)
Carrier Dome Princeton 8–7
(OT)
Virginia
2004
Details
Princeton, NJ
(Princeton)
Princeton Stadium Virginia 10–4 Princeton
2005
Details
Annapolis, MD
(Navy)
Navy–Marine Corps Memorial Stadium Northwestern 13–10 Virginia
2006
Details
Boston, MA
(Boston U.)
Nickerson Field Northwestern 7–4 Dartmouth
2007
Details
Philadelphia, PA
(Penn)
Franklin Field Northwestern 15–13 Virginia
2008
Details
Towson, MD
(Towson)
Johnny Unitas Stadium Northwestern 10–6 Penn
2009
Details
Towson, MD
(Towson)
Johnny Unitas Stadium Northwestern 21–7 North Carolina
2010
Details
Towson, MD
(Towson)
Johnny Unitas Stadium Maryland 13–11 Northwestern
2011
Details
Stony Brook, NY
(Stony Brook)
Kenneth P. LaValle Stadium Northwestern 8–7 Maryland
2012
Details
Stony Brook, NY
(Stony Brook)
Kenneth P. LaValle Stadium Northwestern 8–6 Syracuse
2013
Details
Villanova, PA
(Villanova)
Villanova Stadium North Carolina 13–12
(3OT)
Maryland
2014
Details
Towson, MD
(Towson)
Johnny Unitas Stadium Maryland 15–12 Syracuse
2015
Details
Chester, PA
(Saint Joseph's)
PPL Park Maryland 9–8 North Carolina
2016
Details
Chester, PA
(Saint Joseph's)
Talen Energy Stadium North Carolina 13–7 Maryland
2017
Details
Foxborough, MA
(UMass)
Gillette Stadium Maryland 16–13 Boston College
2018
Details
Stony Brook, NY
(Stony Brook)
Kenneth P. LaValle Stadium James Madison 16–15 Boston College
2019
Details
Baltimore, MD
(Johns Hopkins)
Homewood Field
2020
Details
Baltimore, MD
(Johns Hopkins)
Homewood Field
2021
Details
Towson, MD
(Towson)
Johnny Unitas Stadium
2022
Details
Baltimore, MD
(Johns Hopkins)
Homewood Field

Team titles

2005 NCAA Women's Lacrosse Championship - Virginia Cavaliers vs Northwestern Wildcats
2005 Championship between the Virginia Cavaliers and Northwestern Wildcats
Team Titles Years won
Maryland 13 1986, 1992, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2010, 2014, 2015, 2017
Northwestern 7 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2011, 2012
Princeton 3 1994, 2002, 2003
Virginia 3 1991, 1993, 2004
North Carolina 2 2013, 2016
Penn State 2 1987, 1989
Temple 2 1984, 1988
Delaware 1 1983
Massachusetts 1 1982
New Hampshire 1 1985
Harvard 1 1990
James Madison 1 2018

See also

References

  1. ^ http://fs.ncaa.org/Docs/stats/w_lacrosse_champs_records/2012/d1/champs.pdf

External links

1985 NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship

The 1985 NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship was the fourth annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national championship of Division I NCAA women's college lacrosse. The championship game was played at Franklin Field in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania during May 1985.The New Hampshire Wildcats won their first championship by defeating the Maryland Terrapins in the final, 6–5.

The leading scorer for the tournament was Anysia Fedec, from Maryland, with 8 goals. The Most Outstanding Player trophy would not be awarded again until 1998.

1986 NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship

The 1986 NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship was the fifth annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national championship for Division I National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) women's college lacrosse. The championship game was played at Byrd Stadium in College Park, Maryland during May 1986.

The Maryland Terrapins won their first championship after defeating the Penn State Nittany Lions in the final, 11–10.

For the second consecutive year, the leading scorer for the tournament was Anysia Fedec, from Maryland, with 13 goals. The Most Outstanding Player trophy was not awarded this year.

1987 NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship

The 1987 NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship was the sixth annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national championship for Division I National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) women's college lacrosse. The championship game was played at Byrd Stadium in College Park, Maryland during May 1987.

Penn State defeated Temple, 7–6, in the final to win their first championship.

The leading scorers for the tournament, both with 9 goals, were Karen Geromini, from New Hampshire, and Tami Worley, from Penn State. The Most Outstanding Player trophy was not awarded this year.

1988 NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship

The 1988 NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship was the seventh annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national championship for Division I National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) women's college lacrosse. The championship game was played at Walton Field in Haverford, Pennsylvania during May 1988.

The Temple Owls won their second championship by defeating the Penn State Nittany Lions in the final, 15–7. This was a rematch of the previous year's final, won by Penn State. Furthermore, Temple's win secured an undefeated season (19–0) for the Owls.

The leading scorers for the tournament, all with 8 goals, were Gail Cummings (Temple), Denise Bourassa (Temple), Mandee Moore (Temple), and Tami Worley (Penn State). The Most Outstanding Player trophy was not awarded this year.

1989 NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship

The 1989 NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship was the eighth annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national championship for Division I National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) women's college lacrosse. The championship game was played at John A. Farrell Stadium in West Chester, Pennsylvania during May 1989. The Penn State Nittany Lions won their second championship by defeating the Harvard Crimson in the final, 7–8. This was Penn State's fourth consecutive appearance in the tournament final (2 wins, 2 losses).

The leading scorer for the tournament, with 6 goals, was Karen Everling, from Harvard. The Most Outstanding Player trophy was not awarded this year.

1992 NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship

The 1992 NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship was the 11th annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national championship of Division I NCAA women's college lacrosse. The championship game was played at Goodman Stadium in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania during May 1992. All NCAA Division I women's lacrosse programs were eligible for this championship; a total of 6 teams were invited to participate.

Maryland defeated Harvard, 11–10 (in overtime), to win their second national championship.

The leading scorers for the tournament, both with 7 goals, were Liz Berkery (Harvard) and Betsy Elder (Maryland). The Most Outstanding Player trophy was not awarded this year.

1993 NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship

The 1993 NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship was the 12th annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national championship of Division I NCAA women's college lacrosse. The championship game was played at Byrd Stadium in College Park, Maryland during May 1993. All NCAA Division I women's lacrosse programs were eligible for this championship; a total of 6 teams were invited to participate.

Virginia defeated Princeton, 8–6 (in overtime), to win their second national championship.

The leading scorer for the tournament, with 9 goals, was Jenny Bristow, from Princeton. The Most Outstanding Player trophy was not awarded this year.

1995 NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship

The 1995 NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship was the 14th annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of Division I NCAA women's college lacrosse. The championship game was played at Lions Stadium in Trenton, New Jersey during May 1995. All NCAA Division I women's lacrosse programs were eligible for this championship; a total of 6 teams were invited to participate.

Maryland defeated Princeton, 13–5, to win their third national championship. This would subsequently be the first of Maryland's record seven straight national titles (1995–2001). Furthermore, Maryland's championship secured an undefeated season (17–0) for the team.

The leading scorer for the tournament, with 10 goals, was Cristi Samaras from Princeton. The Most Outstanding Player trophy was not awarded this year.

1996 NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship

The 1996 NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship was the 15th annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of Division I NCAA women's college lacrosse. The championship game was played at Goodman Stadium in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania during May 1996. All NCAA Division I women's lacrosse programs were eligible for this championship; a total of 6 teams were invited to participate.

Maryland defeated Virginia, 10–5, to win their fourth, and second consecutive, national championship. This would subsequently become the second of Maryland's record seven straight national titles (1995–2001). Furthermore, Maryland's championship win secured its second straight undefeated season (19–0).

The leading scorer for the tournament, with 7 goals, was Kelly Amonte from Maryland. The Most Outstanding Player trophy was not awarded this year.

2000 NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship

The 2000 NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship was the 19th annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of Division I NCAA women's college lacrosse. The championship game was played at Lions Stadium in Trenton, New Jersey during May 2000. All NCAA Division I women's lacrosse programs were eligible for this championship. Ultimately, 12 teams were invited to the tournament.

Maryland defeated Princeton, 16–8, to win their eighth overall and sixth consecutive, national championship. This would subsequently become the sixth of Maryland's record seven straight national titles (1995–2001).

For the second consecutive year, the leading scorer for the tournament was Jen Adams from Maryland, with 22 goals. Adams was also again named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.

2001 NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship

The 2001 NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship was the 20th annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of Division I NCAA women's college lacrosse. The championship game was played at Homewood Field in Baltimore, Maryland during May 2001. All NCAA Division I women's lacrosse programs were eligible for this championship. This year, the tournament field expanded from 12 to 16 teams, its current size.

Maryland defeated Georgetown, 14–13 after triple overtime, to win their ninth overall, and seventh consecutive, national championship. This was the last of Maryland's record seven straight national titles (1995–2001). With the win, the Terrapins also secured an undefeated season (23–0).

For the third consecutive year, the leading scorer for the tournament was Jen Adams from Maryland (26 goals). Courtney Martinez, also from Maryland, was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.

2003 NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship

The 2003 NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship was the 22nd annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of Division I NCAA women's college lacrosse. The championship game was played at the Carrier Dome in Syracuse, New York during May 2003. All NCAA Division I women's lacrosse programs were eligible for this championship. A total of 16 teams were invited to participate.

Princeton defeated Virginia, 8–7 (in overtime), to win their third overall, and second consecutive, national championship.

The leading scorer for the tournament was Lauren Aumiller from Virginia (21 goals). Rachel Becker, from Princeton, was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.

2006 NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship

The 2006 NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship was the 25th annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of Division I NCAA women's college lacrosse. The championship game was played at Nickerson Field in Boston, Massachusetts during May 2006. All NCAA Division I women's lacrosse programs were eligible for this championship, and a total of 16 teams were invited to participate.

Northwestern defeated Dartmouth, 7–4, to win their second national championship. This would subsequently become the second of Northwestern's seven national titles in eight years (2005–2009, 2011–12).

The leading scorer for the tournament was Crysti Foote from Notre Dame (17 goals). Sarah Albrecht, from Northwestern, was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.

2008 NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship

The 2008 NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship was the 27th annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of Division I NCAA women's college lacrosse. The championship game was played at Johnny Unitas Stadium in Towson, Maryland during May 2008. All NCAA Division I women's lacrosse programs were eligible for this championship, and a total of 16 teams were invited to participate.

Northwestern defeated Penn 10–6 to win their fourth overall, as well as fourth straight, national championship. This would subsequently become the fourth of Northwestern's seven national titles in eight years (2005–2009, 2011–12).

The leading scorer for the tournament was Hilary Bowen from Northwestern (23 goals). Bowen was also named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.

2013 NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship

The 2013 NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship was the 32nd annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of Division I NCAA women's college lacrosse. The semifinal and championship rounds were played at Villanova Stadium (the home of Villanova Wildcats football) from May 24–26, 2013.The University of North Carolina defeated their ACC rival University of Maryland to win their first ever women's lacrosse championship.

2015 NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship

The 2015 NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship was the 34th annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of Division I NCAA women's college lacrosse. For the first time, the semifinal and championship rounds were played at PPL Park (the home of the Philadelphia Union of the MLS) in Chester, Pennsylvania from May 22–24, 2015.Maryland defeated North Carolina in the final, 9–8, to win their twelfth national title.

2016 NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship

The 2016 NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship was the 35th annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of Division I NCAA women's college lacrosse. The semifinal and championship rounds were played at Talen Energy Stadium (the home of Major League Soccer's Philadelphia Union) in Chester, Pennsylvania from May 27–29, 2016. All other rounds were played at campus sites, usually at the home field of the higher-seeded team, from May 13–22.

2017 NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship

The 2017 NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship is the 36th annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of Division I NCAA women's college lacrosse. The semifinal and championship rounds will be played at Gillette Stadium in Foxborough, Massachusetts from May 26–28, 2017. All other rounds were played at campus sites, usually at the home field of the higher-seeded team, from May 12–21.

2018 NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship

The 2018 NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship is the 37th annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of Division I NCAA women's college lacrosse. The semifinal and championship rounds will be played at Kenneth P. LaValle Stadium in Stony Brook, New York from May 25-27, 2018. All other rounds were played at campus sites, usually at the home field of the higher-seeded team, from May 11–20.

NCAA Division I Women's Lacrosse Championship
Tournaments
Records & statistics
NCAA
Division I
Division II
Division III
Single-division sports
and championships
Women's
basketball
Women's
ice hockey
Women's soccer
Women's softball
Women's
gridiron football
Other sports
National
Collegiate
Athletic
Association
National Association of
Intercollegiate Athletics
Professional
College
Overview
Types
Equipment
Countries
Competitions
Teams
People
Variants

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.