NCAA Division II Men's Lacrosse Championship

The NCAA Division II Men's Lacrosse Championship is the annual championship in men's lacrosse held by the NCAA for teams competing in Division II.[1]

Following the institution of a tournament for Division I in 1971 by the NCAA, the United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association added a "small college" tournament for two years for all non-Division I schools. In 1972, Hobart defeated Washington College 15-12 to win the USILA title. And Cortland State beat Washington College to win the 1973 title, 13-8.[2]

Beginning in 1974, a combined NCAA Division II and III tournament was played through the 1979 season, after which separate divisional championships were instituted. The Division II championship was discontinued after the 1981 season. Following a twelve-year interruption, the tournament was resumed in 1993.

Lacking a tournament from 1982 to 1992, several Division II teams received invitations to the Division I tournament, including Adelphi in 1982, C.W. Post in 1986, Adelphi again in 1987, where they upset Army, and Adelphi once more in 1989, where they received a number five seeding.

NCAA Division II Men's Lacrosse Championship
SportField lacrosse
Founded1974
No. of teams8
CountryUnited States
Most recent
champion(s)
Merrimack (1st)
Most titlesAdelphi (7)
TV partner(s)ESPN
CBS College Sports Network
Official websiteNCAA.com

Results

NCAA Division II Men's Lacrosse Championship
(NCAA Men's College Division Lacrosse Championship)
Year Site
(Host Team)
Stadium Championship Semifinalists
Champion Score Runner-up
1974
Details
Cortland, New York
(Cortland State)
SUNY Cortland Stadium Complex Towson State 18–17 Hobart Adelphi and Cortland State
1975
Details
Brookville, New York
(C.W. Post)
C.W. Post Stadium Cortland State 12–11 Hobart Towson State and Washington College
1976
Details
Catonsville, Maryland
(UMBC)
UMBC Stadium Hobart 18–9 Adelphi Ohio Wesleyan and Washington College
1977
Details
Geneva, New York
(Hobart)
Boswell Field Hobart (2) 23–13 Washington College Roanoke and UMBC
1978
Details
Roanoke 14–13 Hobart Cortland State and UMBC
1979
Details
Garden City, New York
(Adelphi)
Motamed Field Adelphi 17–12 UMBC St. Lawrence and Towson State
1980
Details
Catonsville, Maryland
(UMBC)
UMBC Stadium UMBC 23–14 Adelphi No semifinals held
1981
Details
Garden City, New York
(Adelphi)
Motamed Field Adelphi (2) 17–14 Loyola (MD)
1982–1992 No championship held
1993
Details
Brookville, New York
(C.W. Post)
C.W. Post Stadium Adelphi (3) 11–7 C.W. Post No semifinals held
1994
Details
Springfield 15–12 NYIT
1995
Details
Springfield, Massachusetts
(Springfield)
Stagg Field Adelphi (4) 12–10 Springfield
1996
Details
Brookville, New York
(C.W. Post)
C.W. Post Stadium C.W. Post 15–10 Adelphi
1997
Details
Garden City, New York
(Adelphi)
Motamed Field NYIT 18–11 Adelphi
1998
Details
Piscataway, New Jersey
(Rutgers)
Rutgers Stadium Adelphi (5) 18–6 C.W. Post
1999
Details
College Park, Maryland
(Maryland)
Byrd Stadium Adelphi (6) 11–8 C.W. Post
2000
Details
Limestone 10–9 C.W. Post
2001
Details
Piscataway, New Jersey
(Rutgers)
Rutgers Stadium Adelphi (7) 14–10 Limestone C.W. Post and Wingate
2002
Details
Limestone (2) 11–9 NYIT Le Moyne and St. Andrew's (NC)
2003
Details
Baltimore M&T Bank Stadium NYIT 9–4 Limestone Le Moyne and Mercyhurst
2004
Details
Le Moyne 11–10
(2OT)
Limestone Mercyhurst and NYIT
2005
Details
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Lincoln Financial Field NYIT (2) 14–13
(OT)
Limestone C.W. Post and Le Moyne
2006
Details
Le Moyne (2) 12–5 Dowling Limestone and Mercyhurst
2007
Details
Baltimore, Maryland M&T Bank Stadium Le Moyne (3) 6–5 Mercyhurst Limestone and NYIT
2008
Details
Foxborough, Massachusetts Gillette Stadium NYIT (3) 16–11 Le Moyne Bryant and Limestone
2009
Details
C.W. Post (2) 8–7 Le Moyne Limestone and Merrimack
2010
Details
Baltimore, Maryland M&T Bank Stadium C.W. Post (3) 14–9 Le Moyne Dowling and Limestone
2011
Details
Mercyhurst 9–8 Adelphi C.W. Post and Limestone
2012
Details
Foxborough, Massachusetts Gillette Stadium Dowling 11–10 Limestone Le Moyne and Mercyhurst
2013
Details
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Lincoln Financial Field Le Moyne (4) 11–10 Mercyhurst Adelphi and Limestone
2014
Details
Baltimore, Maryland M&T Bank Stadium Limestone (3) 12–6 LIU Post Adelphi and Tampa
2015
Details
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Lincoln Financial Field Limestone (4) 9–6 Le Moyne Lake Erie and Merrimack
2016
Details
Le Moyne (5) 8-4 Limestone Merrimack and Tampa
2017
Details
Foxborough, Massachusetts Gillette Stadium Limestone (5) 11-9 Merrimack Adelphi and Tampa
2018
Details
Foxborough, Massachusetts Gillette Stadium Merrimack 23-6 St. Leo Seton Hill and Lenoir-Rhyne

Team Championship records

Team Championships Appearances Winning years
Adelphi 7 11 1979, 1981, 1993, 1995, 1998, 1999, 2001
Le Moyne 5 9 2004, 2006, 2007, 2013, 2016
Limestone 5 11 2000, 2002, 2014, 2015, 2017
New York Tech 4 6 1997, 2003, 2005, 2008
C W Post 3 8 1996, 2009, 2010
Hobart 2 5 1976, 1977
Mercyhurst 1 3 2011
Dowling 1 2 2012
Springfield 1 2 1994
UMBC 1 2 1980
Merrimack 1 2 2018
Roanoke 1 1 1978
Cortland State 1 1 1975
Towson State 1 1 1974
Loyola (MD) 0 1
St. Leo 0 1
Washington (MD) 0 1

See also

References

  1. ^ "Division II Men's Lacrosse Championship Results" (PDF). NCAA. NCAA.org. Retrieved January 6, 2016.
  2. ^ Scott, Bob (1976). Lacrosse Technique and Tradition. The Johns Hopkins University Press. ISBN 0-8018-2060-X.

External links

1974 NCAA Division II Lacrosse Championship

The 1974 NCAA Division II Lacrosse Championship was the first annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champions of NCAA Division II men's college lacrosse in the United States. That year's championship game was played at the SUNY Cortland Stadium Complex at SUNY Cortland in Cortland, New York.Three editions of the NCAA Division I Lacrosse Championship were contested before a separate championship was established for Division II programs. In addition, two USILA "small college" tournaments were held in 1972 and 1973.

Towson State defeated Hobart in the final, 18−17 (in double overtime), to win their first national title.

1975 NCAA Division II Lacrosse Championship

The 1975 NCAA Division II Lacrosse Championship was the second annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champions of NCAA Division II men's college lacrosse in the United States. That year's championship game was played at C.W. Post Stadium at the C.W. Post Campus of Long Island University in Brookville, New York.Cortland defeated Hobart in the final, 12−11, to win their first national title. The Red Dragons (10–4) were coached by Chuck Winters.

1976 NCAA Division II Lacrosse Championship

The 1976 NCAA Division II Lacrosse Championship was the third annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champions of NCAA Division II men's college lacrosse in the United States.

The championship game was played at UMBC Stadium at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County in Catonsville, Maryland.After losing in the final the prior two seasons, Hobart defeated Adelphi, 19−9, to win their first national title.

The Statesmen (14–3) were coached by Jerry Schmidt.

1977 NCAA Division II Lacrosse Championship

The 1977 NCAA Division II Lacrosse Championship was the fourth annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champions of NCAA Division II and Division III men's college lacrosse in the United States.

A separate Division III men's championship would not be introduced until 1980.

This year's final was played at Boswell Field at the Hobart College in Geneva, New York.Defending champions Hobart defeated Washington College, 23−13, to win their second national title. This marked four consecutive championship game appearances for Hobart.

The undefeated Statesmen (15–0) were coached by Jerry Schmidt.

1978 NCAA Division II Lacrosse Championship

The 1978 NCAA Division II Lacrosse Championship was the fifth annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champions of NCAA Division II and Division III men's college lacrosse in the United States.

A separate Division III men's championship would not be introduced until 1980.

This year's final was played at Boswell Field at the Hobart College in Geneva, New York.Roanoke defeated two-time defending champion Hobart in the final, 14–13, to win their first national title. This was also Hobart's fifth consecutive appearance in the tournament's championship final.

The Maroons (12–2) were coached by Paul Griffin.

1979 NCAA Division II Lacrosse Championship

The 1979 NCAA Division II Lacrosse Championship was the sixth annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champions of NCAA Division II and Division III men's college lacrosse in the United States.

This was the final championship before the introduction of a separate Division III men's championship in 1980. As such, this was the final year of the tournament's twelve-team format.

The final was played at Motamed Field at Adelphi University in Garden City, New York.Adelphi defeated UMBC in the final, 17–12, to win their first national title. The Panthers (13–3) were coached by Paul Doherty.

This was the first Division II championship game without Hobart, who lost to St. Lawrence in the quarterfinals. The defending champions, Roanoke, also fell in the quarterfinal round.

1980 NCAA Division III Lacrosse Championship

The 1980 NCAA Division III Lacrosse Championship was the inaugural single-elimination tournament to determine the national champions of NCAA Division III men's college lacrosse in the United States.

This was the first championship exclusively for Division III men's lacrosse programs, who previously competed in a combined-format Division II championship from 1974 to 1979.

The tournament field included eight times, with the final played at Boswell Field at the Hobart and William Smith Colleges in Geneva, New York.Hosts Hobart defeated Cortland in the final, 11–8, to win their first Division III national title. The Statesmen (12–2) were coached by Dave Urick. Hobart had previously won two national titles at the Division II level (1976 and 1977).

1980 NCAA Division II Lacrosse Championship

The 1980 NCAA Division II Lacrosse Championship was the seventh annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champions of NCAA Division II men's college lacrosse in the United States.

This was the first tournament exclusively for Division II men's programs following the introduction of a separate Division III men's championship. With the exodus of programs, the tournament field decreased from twelve to just two.

The final, and only match of the tournament, was played at UMBC Stadium at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County in Catonsville, Maryland.In a rematch of the previous year's final, hosts UMBC defeated defending champions Adelphi, 23–14, to win their first national title. The Retrievers (11–3) were coached by Dick Watts.

2016 NCAA Division III Men's Lacrosse Championship

The 2016 NCAA Division III Men's Lacrosse Championship is the 37th annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of NCAA Division III men's college lacrosse in the United States. The championship will be played at Lincoln Financial Field in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on May 29, 2016. All other rounds will be played at campus sites, always at the home field of the higher-seeded team, from May 11–22.

2016 NCAA Division II Men's Lacrosse Championship

The 2016 NCAA Division II Men's Lacrosse Championship is the 32nd annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champions of NCAA Division II men's college lacrosse in the United States. The championship game will be played at Lincoln Financial Field in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on May 29, 2016. All other matches will be played at campus sites, always at the home field of the higher-seeded team, from May 14 to 22.

LeMoyne defeated defending-champions Limestone in the final, 8−4, to win their fifth national title.

College lacrosse

College lacrosse is played by student-athletes at colleges and universities in the United States and Canada. In both countries, men's field lacrosse and women's lacrosse are played at both the varsity and club levels. College lacrosse in Canada is sponsored by the Canadian University Field Lacrosse Association (CUFLA) and Maritime University Field Lacrosse League (MUFLL), while in the United States, varsity men's and women's lacrosse is governed by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA) and National Association of Intercolliegiate Athletics (NAIA). There are also university lacrosse programs in the United Kingdom sponsored by British Universities and Colleges Sport (BUCS) and programs in Japan.

In the U.S., as of the 2016–17 academic year, there were 71 NCAA-sanctioned Division I men's lacrosse teams, 61 Division II men's lacrosse teams and 236 Division III men's lacrosse teams. There are 112 Division I women's lacrosse teams, 105 Division II women's lacrosse teams, and 282 Division III women's lacrosse teams. There were also 27 men's programs and 16 women's programs at two-year community colleges organized by the National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA) and a growing number of National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) four-year small college programs.

As of 2016–17, there were 184 collegiate men's club teams competing through the Men's Collegiate Lacrosse Association (MCLA), including most major universities in the United States without NCAA men's programs, organized into two divisions and ten conferences. Schools that feature an NCAA Division I FBS football team must play in Division 1, while most other teams compete in Division 2. There are 225 collegiate club teams for women organized by the Women's Collegiate Lacrosse Associates (WCLA).

NCAA Division III Men's Lacrosse Championship

The NCAA Division III Men's Lacrosse Championship is the annual championship in men's lacrosse held by the NCAA for teams competing in Division III.

After the inauguration of the NCAA Division I championship in 1971, the USILA added a "small college" tournament for two years for all non-Division I schools. Hobart defeated Washington College 15-12 to win the 1972 USILA title. And Cortland State beat Washington College to win the 1973 title, 13-8.The NCAA conducted a combined Division II and III tournament for the 1974 through 1979 seasons, followed by separate tournaments for Division II and Division III beginning in 1980.

NCAA Division II Women's Lacrosse Championship

The annual NCAA Division II Women's Lacrosse Championship tournament has determined the top women's lacrosse team in the NCAA Division II since 2001.Adelphi is the most successful team, with eight national titles.

NCAA Division I Men's Lacrosse Championship

The NCAA Division I Men's Lacrosse Championship tournament determines the annual top men's field lacrosse team in the NCAA Division I. This tournament has determined the national champion since the inaugural 1971 NCAA Division I Men's Lacrosse Championship. From 1936 through 1970, the United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association (USILA) awarded the Wingate Memorial Trophy to the NCAA Division I annual champion based on regular season records.

NCAA Men's Lacrosse Championship

The NCAA Men's Lacrosse Championship refers to one of three championships in men's field lacrosse contested by the NCAA since 1971 to determine the top team in the NCAA Division I, Division II, and Division III.

NCAA Division I Men's Lacrosse Championship

NCAA Division II Men's Lacrosse Championship

NCAA Division III Men's Lacrosse ChampionshipThis tournament has determined the national champion since the inaugural 1971 NCAA Division I Men's Lacrosse Championship. Prior to this, from 1936 through 1970, the executive board of the United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association (USILA) selected the annual winners of the Wingate Memorial Trophy as national champions based on season records.

The NCAA Men's Lacrosse Championship, with the semi-finals and finals played in National Football League stadiums, is among the most attended NCAA Championships

North East College Lacrosse League

The North East Collegiate Lacrosse League (NECLL) was a regional organization of non-varsity men's club field lacrosse programs in the Northeastern United States. The league was founded in 2006 by club teams from Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Connecticut. Like the Great Lakes Lacrosse League (GLLL) and the National College Lacrosse League (NCLL), schools that have a varsity lacrosse program may join the league. The league ceased operations prior to the 2014 season.

Sports in Baltimore

Baltimore, Maryland has a long and storied sporting history encompassing many teams from many different eras. Area fans, such as the late Wild Bill Hagy, are known for their passion and reverence for historical sports figures who played in the city or were born there.

Among other sports, Baltimore is also known for horse racing. The Preakness Stakes is a 1-3/16 mile (1.91 km) American Grade I stakes race for three-year-old thoroughbred horses, held on the third Saturday in May each year at Pimlico Race Course in Baltimore. The Preakness Stakes has been termed "The Run for the Black-Eyed Susans" because a blanket of Black-eyed Susans (Rudbeckia hirta, the state flower of Maryland) is traditionally placed around the winner's neck. The Preakness is the second leg in American thoroughbred racing's Triple Crown series and almost always attracts the Kentucky Derby winner, and some of the other horses that ran in the Derby.

Stagg Field (Springfield College)

Stagg Field (formerly known as "Benedum Field") is an athletic field on the campus of Springfield College in Springfield, Massachusetts. It has bleacher seating for 3,867, is the competition field for football, field hockey, and men’s and women’s lacrosse. It is also used for physical education classes and intramural sports. The Springfield College men's and women's soccer teams formerly played on the field. Benedum Field also hosts central vs. western Massachusetts high school football Super Bowl games.

Featuring the first Astroturf12 surface in the nation to be installed on a college playing field, it is plowable and used year-round. The field is lighted according to NCAA standards for night games and has a heated and air conditioned press box.The field is named for Amos Alonzo Stagg, and was resurfaced with "monofilament FieldTurf" during the summer of 2007.

Towson Tigers men's lacrosse

The Towson Tigers men's lacrosse team represents Towson University in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I college lacrosse.

NCAA
Division I
Division II
Division III
Single-division sports
and championships

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