NCAA Basketball Tournament Most Outstanding Player

At the conclusion of the NCAA men's and women's Division I basketball championships (the "Final Four" tournaments), the Associated Press selects a Most Outstanding Player. The MOP need not be, but almost always is, a member of the Championship team, especially since the third-place game was eliminated after 1981. The last man to win the award despite not being on the Championship team was Hakeem Olajuwon (Houston) in 1983. Dawn Staley (Virginia) was the only woman to do so, when she won the award in 1991.

Past winners

An asterisk (*) next to a player's name indicates they did not play for the championship team. Howard Porter of Villanova won the award in 1971 and did not play for the championship team, but his MOP award was later vacated.

NCAA Men's Division I MOP Award

NCAA Women's Division I MOP Award

External links

1946 NCAA Basketball Championship Game

The 1946 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championship Game took place on March 26, 1946 between the North Carolina Tar Heels and Oklahoma A&M Aggies at Madison Square Garden in New York City, New York. The match-up was the final one of the eighth consecutive NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championship single-elimination tournament — commonly referred to as the NCAA Tournament — organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and is used to crown a national champion for men's basketball at the Division I level.The Aggie won their second consecutive NCAA Men's Basketball National Championship. Bob Kurland was named the NCAA Basketball Tournament Most Outstanding Player for his efforts throughout the tournament, an honor which he won in the previous year's tournament.

1964–65 Princeton Tigers men's basketball team

The 1964–65 Princeton Tigers men's basketball team represented Princeton University in intercollegiate college basketball during the 1964–65 NCAA University Division men's basketball season. Butch van Breda Kolff served as head coach and the team captain was Bill Bradley. The team played its home games in the Dillon Gymnasium in Princeton, New Jersey. The team was the champion of the Ivy League, earning an invitation to the 23-team 1965 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament.The team posted a 23–6 overall record and a 13–1 conference record. The team won its NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament East region first round contest against the Penn State Nittany Lions by a 60–58 margin at The Palestra on March 8, 1965. Then in the East Regional at Cole Field House in College Park, Maryland, the team defeated NC State 66–48 on March 12 and Providence 109–69 on March 13. Then on March 19 in the national semifinal at the Memorial Coliseum Portland, Oregon, the team was defeated by the Cazzie Russell-led Michigan Wolverines 93–76 before beating the Wichita State Shockers 118–82 the following night. Bill Bradley earned the NCAA Basketball Tournament Most Outstanding Player award.Bradley, who for third consecutive season led the conference in scoring with a 28.8 points per game average in conference games, was a first team All-Ivy League selection. In addition, Bradley was a repeat consensus first team 1965 NCAA Men's Basketball All-American selection by numerous panels: First team (Associated Press, United Press International, National Association of Basketball Coaches, United States Basketball Writers Association, Sporting News, Converse, NEA, Helms Foundation). Bradley also won a Rhodes Scholarship and was a territorial first round selection in the 1965 NBA Draft by the New York Knicks. Bradley surpassed Arthur Loeb (1921–22 and 1922–23) and Cyril Haas (1915–16 and 1916–17) as the school's only three-time men's basketball All-American selection. Over the course of the season, Bradley won the national statistical championship for free throw percentage (88.6%, 273–308).As a result of his performance against Witchita State in the final four, Bradley holds the following NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament records: single-game points scored in a final four (58), single-game field goals made in a final four (22), single-year two-game points scored in a final four (87), and single-year two-game field goals made in a final four (34). Additionally, Bradley formerly held the final four single-game free throw percentage record of 93.3% (minimum 10 made, 14–15), which was broken on March 23, 1972, and single-year two-game free throw percentage record 95.0% (minimum 12 made, 19–20), which was broken in 1972.The team's performance against Witchita State established the current final four victory margin record (36) and the final four single-team single-half points scored record (65, tied). The team's performance formerly held two other final four records: single-half two-team points scored (108, broken March 25, 1972) and single-year two-game field goals made (78, broken in 1977).Bradley continues to hold the single-game, single-season, and career total and average points Ivy League records. In addition, he holds the Ivy records for single-game, single-season, and career field goals made as well as single-season, and career free throws made. His career points, career average, career field goals achieved in 1965 surpassed Tony Lavelli (1949), Chet Forte (1957) and Ernie Beck (1953), respectively. His single-game points record surpassed Lavelli's 52 set on February 26, 1949. His 1965 career 87.6% free throw percentage, which surpassed Gus Broberg's 1941 mark of 85.8%, stood as the Ivy League record until it was eclipsed by Joe Hieser in 1968.

1983 in basketball

The following are the basketball events of the year 1983 throughout the world.

1984 in basketball

The following are the basketball events of the year 1984 throughout the world.

1985 in basketball

The following are the basketball events of the year 1985 throughout the world.

1986 in basketball

The following are the basketball events of the year 1986 throughout the world.

1987 in basketball

The following are the basketball events of the year 1987 throughout the world.

1988 in basketball

The following are the basketball events of the year 1988 throughout the world.

1989 in basketball

The following are the basketball events of the year 1989 throughout the world.

1992 in basketball

The following are the basketball events of the year 1992 throughout the world.

1993 NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Championship Game

The 1993 NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Championship Game took place on April 5, 1993 between the North Carolina Tar Heels and Michigan Wolverines at the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana. The match-up was the final one of the fifty-fifth consecutive NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championship single-elimination tournament — commonly referred to as the NCAA Tournament — organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and is used to crown a national champion for men's basketball at the Division I level.The Tar Heels won their third NCAA Men's Basketball National Championship, after having been victorious in 1957 and 1982 beforehand. Donald Williams was named the NCAA Basketball Tournament Most Outstanding Player for his efforts throughout the tournament.

1996 in basketball

The following are the basketball events of the year 1996 throughout the world.

2018 NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Championship Game

The 2018 NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Championship Game was the final game of the single-elimination tournament to determine the men's National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I college basketball national champion for the 2017–18 season. The game was played on April 2, 2018, at the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas, between the Michigan Wolverines and the Villanova Wildcats. Michigan last won the NCAA championship in 1989, while Villanova won the championship in 2016.

Villanova defeated Michigan, 79–62. Donte DiVincenzo, a reserve player, scored 31 points for Villanova, and was named the NCAA Basketball Tournament Most Outstanding Player.

2019 NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Championship Game

The 2019 NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Championship Game was the final game of the single-elimination tournament to determine the men's National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I college basketball national champion for the 2018–19 season. The game was played on April 8, 2019, at U.S. Bank Stadium in Minneapolis, Minnesota, between the Texas Tech Red Raiders and the Virginia Cavaliers. It was the first time since 1979 that both teams in the national championship game were making their first such appearance. The Cavaliers defeated the Red Raiders, 85–77 in overtime, to win their first national title. Kyle Guy was named the NCAA Basketball Tournament Most Outstanding Player.

A'ja Wilson

A'ja Riyadh Wilson (born August 8, 1996) is an American professional basketball player for the Las Vegas Aces of the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA). Wilson played for the South Carolina Gamecocks in college, and helped lead the Gamecocks to their first NCAA Women's Basketball Championship in 2017, and won the NCAA Basketball Tournament Most Outstanding Player award. In 2018, she won a record 3rd straight SEC Player of the Year award, led South Carolina to a record 4th straight SEC Tournament Championship, became the all-time leading scorer in South Carolina women's basketball history, and was a consensus first-team All-American for the 3rd consecutive season. Wilson swept all National Player of the Year awards (Wade, AP, Honda, USBWA, Wooden, and Naismith) as the best player in Women's College basketball for 2018. Wilson was the first overall pick in the 2018 WNBA Draft.

Chloe Jackson

Chloe Jackson (born August 21, 1996) is an American professional basketball player with the Chicago Sky of the Women’s National Basketball Association. She previously played for the Baylor Lady Bears of the Big 12 Conference. Jackson began her playing career at NC State before transferring to LSU for three years and then to Baylor.

She helped guide her team to win the 2019 National Championship and became the NCAA Basketball Tournament Most Outstanding Player.

Hal Lear

Not to be confused with Hal Greer, another basketball player.

Harold C. "Hal" Lear, Jr. (January 31, 1935 – June 25, 2016) was an American basketball player.

A 6 ft 0 in (1.83 m) guard born in Philadelphia, Lear starred at Temple University in his hometown during the 1950s. He earned the NCAA Basketball Tournament Most Outstanding Player in 1956 after leading Temple to the Final Four, where they lost to the University of Iowa.After college, Lear was selected by the Philadelphia Warriors with the seventh pick of the 1956 NBA draft. His NBA career was brief, however: he appeared in just three games during the 1956–57 NBA season and scored four points.In 2013, Temple retired his No. 6 jersey. Lear died on June 25, 2016 at his home in White Plains, New York after an illness.

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Award

The Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Center of the Year Award is an annual basketball award given by the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame to the top men's collegiate center. Following the success of the Bob Cousy Award which had been awarded since 2004, the award was one of four new awards (along with the Jerry West Award, Julius Erving Award and Karl Malone Award) created as part of the inaugural College Basketball Awards show in 2015. It is named after three-time NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Champion, three-time NCAA Basketball Tournament Most Outstanding Player, and three-time National Player of the Year Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. The inaugural winner was Frank Kaminsky.

Marv Huffman

Marvin Huffman (March 14, 1917 – May 15, 1983) was an American basketball player.

A 6'2" forward, Huffman starred at New Castle High School in Indiana, where he started every game for four years. He then played collegiately at Indiana University, leading the Hoosiers to the 1940 NCAA Championship. After scoring a team-high 12 points in the deciding game over the University of Kansas, Huffman received the second-ever NCAA Basketball Tournament Most Outstanding Player award and earned Converse First Team All-American honors.

Huffman later had a brief professional career with the Akron Wingfoots of the National Basketball League, a forerunner to the NBA. During the 1940-41 NBL season, he averaged 5.1 points in 22 games.Huffman was inducted into the Indiana Basketball Hall of Fame in 1981 and the Indiana University Athletic Hall of Fame in 1989.Huffman' brother Vern was also an All-American basketball player for IU and later went on to play professional football for the Detroit Lions.He graduated from Harvard University in 1952.

NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament Most Outstanding Player
NCAA Division I Women's Basketball Tournament Most Outstanding Player
Tournaments
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Champions & awards
Media & culture
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Men's college basketball awards (United States)
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Women's college basketball awards (United States)
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Conference players of the year
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