NBA TV

NBA TV is an American sports-oriented pay television network that is owned by the National Basketball Association (NBA) and operated by Turner Sports. Dedicated to basketball, the network features exhibition, regular season and playoff game broadcasts from the NBA and related professional basketball leagues, as well as NBA-related content including analysis programs, specials and documentaries. The network also serves as national broadcaster of the NBA G League and WNBA games. NBA TV is the oldest subscription network in North America to be owned or controlled by a professional sports league, having launched on March 17, 1999.

As of January 2016, NBA TV is available to approximately 53.8 million pay television households in America.[1] The highest measured audience was a Golden State Warriors vs San Antonio Spurs regular season game on April 10, 2016 with an average 2.6 million viewers.[2]

NBA TV
NBA TV
LaunchedMarch 17, 1999
Owned byNational Basketball Association
(operated by Turner Sports)
Picture format1080i HDTV
(downscaled to letterboxed 480i for the SDTV feed)
SloganBig games. Big moments.
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Broadcast areaNationwide
HeadquartersAtlanta, Georgia
Formerly calledNBA.com TV (1999–2003)
WebsiteNBAtv
Availability
Satellite
DirecTVChannel 216
Dish NetworkChannel 156
Channel 9508 (VOD)
SA/Cisco PowerVu; G-14
N/Central America/Caribbean
3820 V / 30000 / 5/6 / DVB-S2
18 (SD)
(Transponder 6)
SA/Cisco PowerVu; G-13
N/Central America/Caribbean
4160 V / 29270 / 7/8 / DVB-S
3 (HD)/4 (SD)/5 (test video; SD)
(Transponder 23)
BiG TV (Indonesia)Channel 957
TrueVisions (Thailand)Channel 674 (HD)
Cable
Verizon FiOSChannel 89 (SD)
Channel 589 (HD)
SpectrumChannel 301
IPTV
AT&T U-verseChannel 632 (SD)
Channel 1632 (HD)
Streaming media
fuboTVInternet Protocol television
Sling TVInternet Protocol Television
DirecTV NowInternet Protocol Television
YouTube TVInternet Protocol Television
PlayStation VueInternet Protocol Television

History

The network launched on March 17, 1999 as nba.com TV; the channel, which was renamed NBA TV on February 11, 2003, originally operated from studio facilities housed at NBA Entertainment in Secaucus, New Jersey. The network signed a multi-year carriage agreement with three of the U.S.'s five largest cable providers, Cox Communications, Cablevision and Time Warner Cable, on June 28, 2003; this expanded the network's reach to 45 million pay television households in the U.S., in addition to distribution in 30 countries worldwide. After Time Warner shut down the sports news network CNN/SI in 2002, many cable providers replaced that network with NBA TV.

The network mainly launched with two purposes; to serve as a barker channel for the league's out-of-market sports package NBA League Pass, along with featuring statistical and scoring information which was more easily accessible in the pre-broadband age, and it featured mainly archival content from the NBA Entertainment archives in its upper pane to fill programming time. As time went on, the network added more programming, including international basketball leagues and programming from FIBA usually unseen in the American market. The programming mix and channel format changed around the same time of the CNN/SI shutdown.

On October 8, 2007, it was reported that the National Basketball Association would transfer the channel's operations to Time Warner's Turner Sports division (operated by the company's Turner Broadcasting System subsidiary).[3]

Turner took over the channel's operations on October 28, 2008, and began using the same announcers and analysts used on TNT's NBA telecasts.[4] Analysis and news programming also received an upgrade, with production of the programs being relocated to Studio B at Turner Studios in Atlanta, Georgia, located adjacent to Studio J, where TNT's post-game program Inside the NBA is broadcast.

Carriage agreements

On April 16, 2009, DirecTV announced that it had reached a carriage agreement with the NBA to continue carrying NBA TV, moving it (and out-of-market sports package NBA League Pass) from the satellite provider's Sports Pack add-on tier to its lower-priced Choice Xtra base package on October 1, 2009. DirecTV believed the move will make the channel available to an additional eight million subscribers.[5]

On June 4, 2009, Comcast announced that it had reached an agreement with the NBA to move the channel from the cable provider's Sports Entertainment Package to its basic level Digital Classic package, by the start of the 2009-10 NBA season. Like DirecTV, Comcast estimated that an additional eight million customers would effectively gain access to the channel.[6] Verizon FiOS added the channel and NBA League Pass to its systems on September 23, 2009.[7] The network also signed new multi-year agreements with Time Warner Cable, Cablevision and Dish Network on October 22, 2009, as well as a renewal agreement with Cox Communications earlier in the year.[7]

With all of the above carriage deals, the NBA estimates that it would increase NBA TV's overall subscriber reach to 45 million pay television homes.[7] On October 29, 2010, AT&T U-verse reached a carriage deal to carry the channel's standard and high definition feeds.[8]

NBA TV is not available to legacy Charter Communications customers using outdated billing plans, which carried the network as NBA.com TV prior to 2004, due to unknown carriage conflicts; NBA League Pass is also not carried by Charter (on May 18, 2016, Charter acquired Time Warner Cable and Bright House Networks for $78.7 billion, which both carry the network). NBA TV is available to Charter households where available as of February 2017, if a customer switches to the new 'Spectrum' billing plan which united Charter, Time Warner Cable and Bright House Networks under the Spectrum branding (this is all likely unrelated to Charter's inherited naming rights of the Charlotte Hornets' home arena, the Spectrum Center).

Programming

NBA TV offers news programs devoted to basketball daily, in addition to programs showcasing the lives of individual basketball players, documentaries focusing on a particular NBA team during the season and archived broadcasts of well-known games.

NBA TV carries at least 90 regular season games per season, which typically air four days a week during the NBA season (mainly on Mondays, Tuesdays and Saturdays, although occasional Wednesday, Friday and Sunday games may air in the event that ESPN does not hold rights to coverage on those nights), as well as some first-round playoff games.

Live games on NBA TV are subject to local blackout restrictions, since NBA TV (despite being owned by the league) does not hold the exclusive broadcast rights to any of its games. Games carried by NBA TV are also carried by each team's local rights holder, either a regional sports network or a broadcast television station.

Beginning with the 2012-13 season, the score box displayed during NBA TV's game coverage (which was seen on the lower-left hand corner of the screen) changed to a banner format oriented horizontally across the screen. However, the network does not use timeout or bonus indicators like that seen on the score graphics used on ESPN and TNT.

The network also shows international games, typically on Saturday evenings, with special emphasis on the Euroleague and the Maccabi Tel Aviv team from Israel. In April 2005, NBA TV televised the Chinese Basketball Association finals for the first time.[9]

The channel's flagship program is NBA Gametime Live, a program focusing on news headlines within the NBA and related leagues (including the WNBA and G League), highlights and look-ins at games currently in progress presented by a host and studio analysts. The show airs live six days a week, deferring any TNT game nights outside the playoffs to repeating that evening's edition of Inside the NBA. An edited 90-minute version of the broadcast is repeated during the overnight and early morning hours.

On October 11, 2017, it was announced that the Players Only franchise, which made its debut last season on TNT, will show live games on NBA TV, starting October 24, 2017 and every Tuesday after that, for the first half of the 2017-18 season before transitioning to TNT for the remainder of the regular season starting January 23, 2018.[10]

List of programs broadcast by NBA TV

  • 10 Before Tip
  • 3DTV
  • Beyond The Paint
  • Courtside Cinema
  • Game Of The Day
  • Hardwood Classics
  • High Tops: Plays of the Month
  • Inside the NBA (encore telecasts within 12 hours of original airing on TNT)
  • NBA Action
  • NBA CrunchTime - focuses on live NBA games till the buzzer, includes CrunchTime Alert, similar to NBA Scores
  • NBA Gametime Live
  • NBA Gametime Live Specials (e.g. mock draft, free agent updates, season previews, trade deadline updates, playoff previews)
  • NBA Inside Stuff
  • NBA TV Marquee Matchup
  • NBA TV Originals
  • Open Court
  • Playoff Playback
  • Shaqtin' a Fool
  • The Starters

High definition

NBA TV HD is a 1080i high definition simulcast feed of NBA TV that is available on most providers. All studio programs and original programs are shot in HD, and all live games and recent game rebroadcasts are televised in HD. During certain programs that are not available in HD (such as older game footage), unique stylized pillarboxes are used, displaying the NBA logo with the "NBA TV" text under it, or alternatively, just the "NBA TV" or “NBA HD” text oriented sideways, both shown in black and gray.

Personalities

The studio host and analysts vary on each night's broadcast of NBA Gametime.

Studio hosts & play-by-play

Studio analysts & color commentators

Contributors

Other hosts

The Starters
NBA Inside Stuff

Former hosts and analysts

NBA TV International

NBA TV International is a feed of NBA TV available in countries outside the United States, utilizing the same studio for analysis and commentary segments and taped programming (except for FIBA events and highlights), but largely airs a different lineup of games than the U.S. channel. NBA TV International shows one or two games per day, with the exception of NBA playoff (except 1st and 2nd rounds of the playoffs) including conference finals and the NBA Finals and most nationally televised U.S. games (such as those seen on ABC, TNT, ESPN and US feed of NBA TV); the rights to those games are instead sold to domestic television networks in each territory. As of 2018, NBA TV International can be seen in 40 countries via the following partners:

NBA TV Canada, a Canadian version of the channel, carries some of the same game broadcasts as the flagship U.S. service, ESPN, and TNT instead of the secondary game package found on NBA TV International.

In October 2010, NBA Premium TV was launched in the Philippines. It is a redirect broadcast of NBA TV and airs locally televised and nationally televised games in the United States.

In February 2012, NBA TV International was made available on NBA.TV as an internet subscription channel outside the United States.

On beIN Channels Network in the Arab World, NBA TV itself is not available. However, beIN Sports NBA is a separate channel in HD which airs several of the same games broadcast on NBA TV.

Past playoff broadcast criticism

NBA TV was criticized in the past for its first-round playoff coverage merely passing down the broadcast of a game from a regional sports network for national broadcast, amplifying the chosen team's broadcast and bias for said team to a national level.[12][13] Beginning with the 2011-12 playoffs, NBA TV began to produce a full and neutral national broadcast for those games.[14]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Cable network coverage area household universe estimates: January 2016".
  2. ^ Warriors’ 72nd win sets records for NBA TV, CSN Bay Area - Sports Media Watch, April 11, 2016
  3. ^ http://www.hoopsworld.com/Story.asp?STORY_ID=5541
  4. ^ "Turner promotes NBA digital menu". 2008-10-06. Retrieved 2008-10-15.
  5. ^ NBA TV scores multiyear distribution deal with DirecTV - Pact gives network berth on DBS leader's choice xtra package Multichannel News April 16, 2009
  6. ^ NBA TV jumps to broader Comcast carriage - Pro Hoops Network moves from sports tier to MSO's digital classic Multichannel News June 4, 2009
  7. ^ a b c NBA digital signs deal with FiOS for NBA TV and NBA League Pass TVWeek.com September 23, 2009 Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "oct22" defined multiple times with different content (see the help page).
  8. ^ AT&T U-Verse tips off carriage of NBA TV - league-owned network available on telco's U300 package, HD tier Multichannel News October 29, 2010
  9. ^ NBA.com Chinese Basketball Association coverage expands to U.S
  10. ^ "Pressroom". Turner. Retrieved 11 October 2017.
  11. ^ "Turner Newsroom: NBA.com Host Kyle Montgomery". Retrieved 11 March 2011.
  12. ^ Yoder, Matt (27 April 2011). "Gary Neal's Buzzer Beater And The Sounds Of Silence". Awful Announcing. Bloguin. Retrieved 2 May 2011.
  13. ^ Yoder, Matt (23 April 2011). "Should NBATV Use Local Announcers For Playoff Games?". Awful Announcing. Bloguin. Retrieved 2 May 2011.
  14. ^ Hiestand, Michael (2012-04-22). "Hiestand: NFL draft loses some spontaneity". USAToday.com. Retrieved 2012-04-23.

External links

2008 WNBA Playoffs

The 2008 WNBA Playoffs was the postseason for the Women's National Basketball Association's 2008 season which ended with the Eastern Conference champion Detroit Shock defeating the Western Conference champion San Antonio Silver Stars 3-0.

2009 WNBA season

The 2009 WNBA Season was the 13th season of the Women's National Basketball Association. It is the first WNBA season without a Houston franchise, the Comets having folded in December 2008. The season ended with the Phoenix Mercury winning their second championship in three years.

The regular season began with a televised (ABC) meeting between the defending champion Detroit Shock and the Los Angeles Sparks in Los Angeles on June 6. The Connecticut Sun hosted the 9th Annual All-Star Game which was broadcast live on ABC (HD) on July 25.

2010 WNBA season

The 2010 WNBA season was the 14th season of the Women's National Basketball Association. The regular season began with a televised (ESPN2) meeting between the defending champion Phoenix Mercury and the Los Angeles Sparks in Phoenix, Arizona on May 15. The Connecticut Sun hosted the 10th Annual All-Star Game which was broadcast live on ESPN on July 10. This year, it was a contest between Geno Auriemma's USA Basketball team and a single team of WNBA All-Stars. The Finals was a series between the Seattle Storm and the Atlanta Dream which Seattle won 3-0.

2011 WNBA season

The 2011 WNBA season was the 15th season of the Women's National Basketball Association. The regular season began on June 3 with the Los Angeles Sparks hosting the Minnesota Lynx, featuring 2011 WNBA Draft top pick Maya Moore, in a game televised on NBA TV. Four games followed the next day, with the marquee matchup, televised on ABC, featuring the defending champion Seattle Storm and the Phoenix Mercury in Seattle.

The Minnesota Lynx finished the regular season with the best record in the league at 27-7, and were the top seed in the Western Conference. The Indiana Fever were the top seed in the Eastern Conference. The Lynx ultimately advanced to face the Atlanta Dream in the 2011 WNBA Finals.

2013 NBA Summer League

The 2013 NBA Summer League is a pro basketball league run by the NBA just after the 2013 NBA draft. It gives newly drafted players a chance to test their skills against each other, and to give them a feel for professional basketball. All 30 NBA teams participated, along with the D-League Select. The Miami Heat were the only team to participate in both Summer Leagues. It ran from July 7–12 in Orlando and July 12–22 in Las Vegas. Jeremy Lamb of the Oklahoma City Thunder was named the Most Valuable Player of the Orlando Summer League. Jonas Valančiūnas of the Toronto Raptors went on to be named the Most Valuable Player of the Las Vegas Summer League. Ian Clark of the Golden State Warriors was named the Most Valuable Player of the Las Vegas Summer League Championship Game.

2014 NBA Summer League

The 2014 NBA Summer League consists of two pro basketball leagues organized by the NBA and the Orlando Magic just after the 2014 NBA Draft. Ten teams took part in the week-long summer league at the Amway Center in Orlando, Florida, from July 5 to 11, 2014. The other summer league was the Las Vegas NBA Summer League, having taken place at the Thomas & Mack Center and Cox Pavilion in Paradise, Nevada (near Las Vegas) from July 11 to 21, 2014, with 23 NBA teams and the NBA D-League Select team participating. The Houston Rockets, Miami Heat and Philadelphia 76ers participated in both leagues.

The Philadelphia 76ers won the Orlando Pro Summer League Championship by defeating the Memphis Grizzlies in the title game, 91–75. Elfrid Payton was named the league's most valuable player.The Sacramento Kings won the Las Vegas NBA Summer League Championship by defeating the Houston Rockets in the title game, 77–68. Glen Rice, Jr. of the Washington Wizards was named the league's most valuable player. Ray McCallum of the Kings was named the most valuable player of the championship game.

2015 NBA Summer League

The 2015 NBA Summer League consisted of three pro basketball leagues organized by the NBA: the Orlando Pro Summer League, Utah Jazz Summer League, and Las Vegas Summer League.Ten teams participated in the week-long Orlando Pro Summer League at Amway Center in Orlando, Florida, from July 4 to 10, 2015. The Memphis Grizzlies won the Orlando Pro Summer League Championship over the Orlando Magic White team, 75-73, on a buzzer-beater floater by Russ Smith in double overtime. Aaron Gordon of the Orlando Magic was named the league's Most Valuable Player. The Miami Heat and Brooklyn Nets also participated in the Las Vegas Summer League.

The Utah Jazz Summer League was introduced for the first time in 2015, marking the first summer league to be played in Utah since the Rocky Mountain Revue was last held in 2008. Four teams participated in a round-robin format from July 6 to 9, 2015. No tournament was held, nor was there a champion named, but the Utah Jazz had the best record of the four teams, as they went undefeated with a 3-0 record. All four teams (Utah Jazz, Boston Celtics, Philadelphia 76ers, and San Antonio Spurs) also participated in the Las Vegas Summer League.

The Las Vegas NBA Summer League is the official summer league of the NBA. It is the premier summer league of the three, with a total of 23 teams, plus a Select Team from the NBA Development League, participating. A total of 67 games were played from July 10 to 20, 2015, across two different venues, the Thomas & Mack Center and Cox Pavilion, both located in Paradise, Nevada (near Las Vegas). The San Antonio Spurs won the Championship by defeating the Phoenix Suns in the championship game, 93-90. Kyle Anderson was named the league's Most Valuable Player, with Jonathon Simmons of the Spurs being named the Championship Game MVP. The Spurs championship was historic, as they were coached by Becky Hammon, the first full-time female assistant coach in the NBA.

2016 NBA Summer League

The 2016 NBA Summer League consisted of three pro basketball leagues organized by the National Basketball Association (NBA): the Orlando Pro Summer League, Utah Jazz Summer League, and Las Vegas Summer League.Ten teams participated in the week-long Orlando Pro Summer League at Amway Center in Orlando, Florida, from July 2 to 8, 2016. The Orlando Magic (White) won the Orlando Pro Summer League championship over the Detroit Pistons, 87–84 in overtime. Arinze Onuaku of Orlando Magic (White) was named the MVP. The Dallas Mavericks and Miami Heat also participated in the Las Vegas Summer League.The Utah Jazz Summer League was introduced for the first time last year, marking the first summer league to be played in Utah since the Rocky Mountain Revue was last held in 2008. Four teams participated in a round-robin format from July 4 to 7, 2016. No tournament was held, nor was there a champion named, but the Boston Celtics had the best record of the four teams with an undefeated record of 3–0. All four teams (Utah Jazz, Boston Celtics, Philadelphia 76ers, and San Antonio Spurs) also participated in the Las Vegas Summer League.The Las Vegas NBA Summer League is the official summer league of the National Basketball Association. It is the premier summer league of the three, with a total of 23 teams, plus a Select Team from the NBA Development League, participating. A total of 67 games were played from July 8 to 18, 2016, at the Thomas & Mack Center and Cox Pavilion, both located in Paradise, Nevada (near Las Vegas). The Chicago Bulls won the championship by defeating the Minnesota Timberwolves in the final, 84–82, on a buzzer-beater by Denzel Valentine in overtime. Tyus Jones was named the league's Most Valuable Player, with Jerian Grant of the Bulls being named the championship game MVP.

2017 NBA Summer League

The 2017 NBA Summer League consisted of three pro basketball leagues organized by the National Basketball Association (NBA): the Orlando Pro Summer League, Utah Jazz Summer League, and Las Vegas Summer League.Eight teams participated in the week-long Orlando Pro Summer League at Amway Center in Orlando, Florida, from July 1 to 6, 2017. Each team played five games over the course of the week, with a championship day being played on the final day of the league. The Dallas Mavericks and Miami Heat also participated in the Las Vegas Summer League.Four teams participated in the round-robin format of the Utah Jazz Summer League from July 3 to 6, 2017. All four teams (Utah Jazz, Boston Celtics, Philadelphia 76ers, and San Antonio Spurs) also participated in the Las Vegas Summer League.The Las Vegas NBA Summer League is the official summer league of the National Basketball Association. It is the premier summer league of the three, with a total of 24 participating. A total of 67 games was played from July 7 to 17, 2017, at the Thomas & Mack Center and Cox Pavilion, both located in Paradise, Nevada (near Las Vegas).

2018 WNBA season

The 2018 WNBA season was the 22nd season of the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA). The Minnesota Lynx are the defending champions. The regular season began on May 18, with the Phoenix Mercury hosting the Dallas Wings. The season ended with the Seattle Storm defeating the Washington Mystics 3-0 in the WNBA Finals. This was the third championship for the Storm. Seattle's Breanna Stewart was named regular season and finals MVP.

List of current National Basketball Association broadcasters

The following is a list of current National Basketball Association broadcasters for each individual team entering the 2018–19 NBA season.

NBA Access with Ahmad Rashad

NBA Access with Ahmad Rashad is an American television program which initially aired on Saturday afternoons on ABC. The program details the behind-the-scenes activities of NBA players, coaches and officials, and serves as a replacement for NBA Inside Stuff. On American markets, the show is still aired; however, it is now moved to NBA TV beginning with the 2008-09 season. Ahmad Rashād has been the only host of this show and has brought on the show famous NBA athletes and coaches such as Kobe Bryant, Phil Jackson, Vince Carter, and many more. NBA Access was also a 30-minute real-life drama television series produced by NBA Entertainment that also chronicled the lives of larger-than-life NBA stars.

NBA Access with Ahmad Rashad presented the NBA’s compelling story lines in the style of a television drama and provided viewers with first-person perspective of its main characters, which included league stars such as Shaquille O’Neal, Richard Jefferson, Carmelo Anthony, Dwight Howard, and Chris Paul. The show delivered exclusive and unprecedented NBA access, and with such access, it was poised to capture the emotional and engaging story lines that emerged in the NBA season.

Also featured in this series were the Maloof brothers, the owners of the Sacramento Kings and Suns head coach Mike D’Antoni. NBA Access with Ahmad Rashad also took a broader approach by going behind-the-scenes with two teams throughout the season: the Detroit Pistons and Denver Nuggets. Rashad hosted the show from a new set at NBA Entertainment’s studios in Secaucus, N.J., which featured a collection of sports fan memorabilia.

NBA Action

NBA Action is a weekly show with news and highlights of the NBA. The show premiered in 1990 on ESPN. It airs on NBA TV with new episodes at 6:30 ET/5:30 CT every Thursday night during the season.

NBA Inside Stuff

NBA Inside Stuff is a television program airing on NBA TV and previously aired on NBC for many years, then on ABC, featuring behind the scenes activities of NBA players. The program also includes features on fitness and fundamentals of basketball. Previously hosted by Ahmad Rashād (and once co-hosted by Julie Moran, and then Willow Bay) and Summer Sanders, the show is now hosted by former NBA star Grant Hill and Kristen Ledlow.

NBA Premium TV

NBA Premium TV is a Philippine pay television sports channel. The channel is a joint broadcasting between Solar Entertainment Corporation and NBA TV. It is a live simulcast broadcast of NBA TV, the league's dedicated channel in the United States.

NBA TV Canada

NBA TV Canada is a Canadian pay television channel that is owned by Maple Leaf Sports & Entertainment (MLSE). It is a Canadian version of NBA TV, broadcasting programming focused on the National Basketball Association, and its Canadian franchise, the Toronto Raptors.

NBA on TNT

The NBA on TNT is a branding used for broadcasts of the National Basketball Association (NBA) games, produced by Turner Sports, the sports division of the Turner Broadcasting System subsidiary of WarnerMedia and televised on TNT since 1989. TNT's NBA coverage includes the Inside the NBA studio show, weekly doubleheaders throughout the regular season on Thursdays, as well as Tuesdays in the second half of the season, a majority of games during the first two rounds of the playoffs, and one conference finals series.

National Basketball Association on television

The National Basketball Association is shown on national television on broadcast channel ABC, cable networks ESPN and TNT, as well as the NBA TV network. The NBA is also shown on multiple regional sports networks. Currently, ESPN shows doubleheaders on Wednesday and Friday nights, while TNT shows doubleheaders on Thursday and Tuesday nights. In the second half of the season, ABC shows a single game on Saturday nights and Sunday afternoons. Games are shown almost every night on NBA TV. There are some exceptions to this schedule, including Tip-off Week, Christmas Day, and Martin Luther King Jr. Day. More games may be shown as the end of the regular season approaches, particularly games with playoff significance. During the playoffs, the first and second rounds are split between TNT, ESPN, NBA TV, and ABC on the weekends. The conference finals are split between ESPN and TNT; the two networks alternate which complete series they will carry from year to year. The entire NBA Finals is shown nationally on ABC. The NBA Finals is one of the few sporting events to be shown on a national broadcast network on a weeknight.

PBA Rush

PBA Rush is a 24/7 exclusive channel of Cignal, which has been currently airing games of the Philippine Basketball Association. The channel is patterned after NBA TV and was launched on July 5, 2016. The 3-year partnership agreement between Cignal and the PBA was signed on July 17, 2016 at the Smart Araneta Coliseum, 2 days after the opening of the 2016 PBA Governors' Cup.Aside from the live telecast of the PBA games (in English commentary), other programming included in PBA Rush are same-day replays of PBA games, games from the PBA D-League, and behind-the-scenes shows such as Kuwentong Gilas. The channel currently focuses on the ongoing season and conference.The channel is aired on Channel 90 in standard definition and Channel 260 in high definition.

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