NBA Summer League

The NBA Summer League, also known as the Las Vegas Summer League, is an off-season competition organized by the National Basketball Association. NBA teams come together to try out different summer rosters instead of their regular season line-ups, including rookie, sophomore and G League affiliate players. The Utah Jazz Summer League also features NBA teams, as did the Orlando Pro Summer League, which operated from 2002 through 2017. Those leagues are sometimes referred to as NBA Summer League when also mentioned with its host location.[1]

NBA Summer League
Current season, competition or edition:
Current sports event 2019 NBA Summer League
NBASummerLeagueLogo
SportBasketball
Inaugural seasonOrlando: 2001 (defunct in 2018)
Las Vegas: 2004
Utah: 2015
Sacramento: 2018
No. of teamsUtah: 4
Sacramento: 4
Las Vegas: 32
CountryUnited States
Most recent
champion(s)
Las Vegas:
Memphis Grizzlies
TV partner(s)NBA TV and ESPN

History

Summer leagues have existed for decades. Historically, there was not an organized structure, with leagues sometimes overlapping and not officially coordinated.[2] In 2004, the league held the Las Vegas Summer League for the first time; it is by far the largest league, with 32 teams participating as of 2019. The Orlando Pro Summer League was held from 2001 to 2017. The Utah Jazz Summer League began play in 2015, replacing the Rocky Mountain Revue, an event held from 1984–2008 before going on a lengthy hiatus due to declining participation.

The leagues generally consist of a handful of games per team. Unlike regulation NBA games, which are 48 minutes long, games only last 40 minutes (same as in FIBA/WNBA), plus multiple 5-minute overtime periods (first overtime is played in its entirety; true sudden death thereafter).[3] Before the 2013 leagues, no official champions were named at any league, with the leagues focusing more on individual auditions and development. A champion is currently named for the Las Vegas league, although team performance is generally not emphasized.

Unsigned free agents are often signed to summer league deals, providing a chance to possibly be signed to a contract during the regular season. Any team can sign the free agent after the league is over, not just the one he played for in summer league. For example, Jeremy Lin, a Harvard graduate, was invited to play for the Dallas Mavericks summer league team despite being undrafted earlier in the year. In the 2010 summer league, Lin performed well and was later signed by the Golden State Warriors.

Las Vegas Summer League

The Las Vegas Summer League played its inaugural season in 2004 University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV)'s arena, the Thomas & Mack Center with six NBA teams – Boston Celtics, Cleveland Cavaliers, Denver Nuggets, Orlando Magic, Phoenix Suns, and Washington Wizards – playing a total of 13 games. With Warren LeGarie leading the way, the summer league had three successful summers in which participation increased to 16 teams playing more than 40 games at UNLV. In 2007, the NBA attached its name to the event, making it the “NBA” summer league.[4] In 2008, the summer league expanded to 22 teams and was sponsored by EA Sports. As of the summer 2015 season, Samsung is the sponsor and the official sponsored branding is the "Samsung NBA Summer League".[5] Since 2018, all NBA teams play in the Las Vegas Summer League in the typical tournament style.

Utah Jazz Summer League

From 1984 until 2008, the Utah Jazz hosted a tournament known as the Rocky Mountain Revue. Launched as a community outreach campaign to encourage interest in the Jazz in the summer of 1984 under the direction of Jazz public relations staffers David Allred and Kim Turner,[6] initially the league operated as a three-week, pro-am league in July with alumni players from Utah, BYU, Weber State and Utah State. In 1990, after sending a team to the California Summer League the previous summer, Scott Layden, then the Jazz's director of basketball operations, invited the Portland Trail Blazers, Phoenix Suns, and Sacramento Kings to join the league and moved to an all-NBA format. Over the course of the next 20 years, as few as four teams (1990) and as many as 16 teams (1998), participated, including the first International entry, Burghy Roma.[7] The league did not play games during the 1999 strike-shortened season. In 2008, the NBA Development League had a D-League Ambassadors team. The Rocky Mountain Revue also showcased the Iranian national team.

Games were hosted at Westminster College (Salt Lake City), East High School (Salt Lake City), Delta Center and the Revue's final home, Salt Lake Community College. The Revue was known for its popularity, evidenced by sold out crowds each time the Jazz played. The Revue was one of the first NBA summer leagues to feature NBA officials, as the NBA used the league for referee development and training. The only NBA teams that did not send a team to the Revue at least once were the Los Angeles Lakers, Detroit Pistons and Washington Wizards.

Due to declining participation, the event was cancelled for the 2009 season.[8][9][10][11] However, the Jazz confirmed in November 2014 that they would revive the league for 2015, albeit with a smaller number of teams participating.[12] The event would include the Boston Celtics, Philadelphia 76ers, and San Antonio Spurs as well as the Jazz in a six-game, four-day event.

Orlando Pro Summer League

The Orlando Pro Summer League began in 2002. Its games were closed to the public and could only be seen on television.[13] It named a champion for the first time in 2013 with the Oklahoma City Thunder defeating the Houston Rockets 85-77.[14][15] On July 11, 2014, the Philadelphia 76ers won the 2014 Orlando Summer League championship with a 91-75 win over the Memphis Grizzlies.[16] The Dallas Mavericks were the champions in 2017.[17] The league ended after 2017 due to the trend of NBA teams participating in the Las Vegas league.[18]

California Classic Summer League

On May 6, 2018, reports surfaced that to replace the position previously held in Orlando by the Magic, the Kings would host its own Summer League event in Sacramento.[19] The event is scheduled to take place before the Las Vegas Summer League begins, with the teams in place for the event involving the Sacramento Kings, Los Angeles Lakers, Golden State Warriors, and Miami Heat. Eight days later, the Kings confirmed that their own Summer League event (titled the California Classic Summer League) would take place from July 2-5, 2018 (taking a day off to celebrate the Fourth of July), replacing the Orlando Pro Summer League. On May 14, 2018, the Sacramento Kings confirmed that report. [20]

Las Vegas MVP winners

Year Nat. Player Pos. Team
2006
United States
Randy Foye[21]
SG
Minnesota Timberwolves
2007
United States
Nate Robinson[21]
PG
New York Knicks
2008
United States
Jerryd Bayless (Top Rookie)[22]
PG
Portland Trail Blazers
2009
United States
Blake Griffin[21]
PF
Los Angeles Clippers
2010
United States
John Wall
PG
Washington Wizards
2012
United States
Damian Lillard (co-MVPs)
PG
Portland Trail Blazers
United States
Josh Selby (co-MVPs)
PG
Memphis Grizzlies
2013
Lithuania
Jonas Valančiūnas
C
Toronto Raptors
2014
United States
Glen Rice Jr.
SG
Washington Wizards
2015
United States
Kyle Anderson
SF
San Antonio Spurs
2016
United States
Tyus Jones
PG
Minnesota Timberwolves
2017
United States
Lonzo Ball
PG
Los Angeles Lakers
2018
United States
Josh Hart
SG
Los Angeles Lakers
2019
Canada
Brandon Clarke
PF
Memphis Grizzlies

Champions

Year League Champion Score Runner-up League MVP Championship MVP
2013 Las Vegas Golden State Warriors 91–77 Phoenix Suns Jonas Valančiūnas Ian Clark
2014 Las Vegas Sacramento Kings 77–68 Houston Rockets Glen Rice Jr. Ray McCallum, Jr.
2015 Las Vegas San Antonio Spurs 93–90 Phoenix Suns Kyle Anderson Jonathon Simmons
2016 Las Vegas Chicago Bulls 84–82 (OT) Minnesota Timberwolves Tyus Jones Jerian Grant
2017 Las Vegas Los Angeles Lakers 110–98 Portland Trail Blazers Lonzo Ball Kyle Kuzma
2018 Las Vegas Portland Trail Blazers 91–73 Los Angeles Lakers Josh Hart K.J. McDaniels
2019 Las Vegas Memphis Grizzlies 95–92 Minnesota Timberwolves Brandon Clarke Brandon Clarke

See also

References

  1. ^ "NBA Summer League". InsideHoops.com. Archived from the original on November 19, 2017.
  2. ^ Zwerling, Jared. "Vegas Baby, Vegas: How Warren LeGarie Made Sin City NBA's Summer League Hot Spot". Bleacher Report. Retrieved 14 July 2015.
  3. ^ "2014 Las Vegas Summer League: Game Rules, Format and Tie-Break Criteria". NBA official website. National Basketball Association. 11 June 2014. Retrieved 14 July 2015.
  4. ^ Zwerling, Jared. "Meet the NBA's King of Summer". Retrieved 12 July 2016.
  5. ^ Release, Official. "Tomorrow's stars to shine bright at Samsung NBA Summer League 2015". Retrieved 12 July 2016.
  6. ^ "NBA.com". Retrieved 12 July 2016.
  7. ^ Utah Jazz Media Guide 2002-2003
  8. ^ Jazz cancel 2009 Rocky Mountain Revue, KSL.com, May 1, 2009
  9. ^ "InsideHoops.com - Rocky Mountain Revue". Retrieved 12 July 2016.
  10. ^ "NBA.com: 2010 NBA Summer League schedule". Retrieved 12 July 2016.
  11. ^ "Rocky Mountain Revue canceled for 2009". Retrieved 12 July 2016.
  12. ^ "Utah's Rocky Mountain Revue NBA summer league may return". Retrieved 12 July 2016.
  13. ^ Robbins, Josh (November 18, 2017). "Magic will play in NBA Summer League in Las Vegas in 2018 and end their Orlando league". Orlando Sentinel. Archived from the original on November 19, 2017.
  14. ^ "Thunder at Rockets". Retrieved 12 July 2016.
  15. ^ "Summer League Recap: Thunder vs. Rockets - THE OFFICIAL SITE OF THE OKLAHOMA CITY THUNDER". Retrieved 12 July 2016.
  16. ^ "76ers at Grizzlies". Retrieved 12 July 2016.
  17. ^ "Mavericks win Orlando Pro Summer League - Official Website of the Dallas Mavericks". The Official Site of the Dallas Mavericks. 2017-07-06. Retrieved 2017-07-08.
  18. ^ "Orlando Magic will no longer host summer league". NBCSports.com. Associated Press. November 20, 2017. Archived from the original on November 20, 2017.
  19. ^ https://www.hoopsrumors.com/2018/05/nba-planning-summer-league-tournament-in-sacramento.html
  20. ^ "Kings to Host California Classic Summer League at Golden 1 Center". Retrieved 14 May 2018.
  21. ^ a b c "Summer League History". NBA.com. July 21, 2009. Retrieved May 29, 2019.
  22. ^ McMenamin, Dave (July 21, 2008). "Q&A with the Las Vegas MVP". NBA.com. Retrieved May 29, 2019.

External links

2010 NBA Summer League

The 2010 National Basketball Association Summer League (NBA Summer League) was a pro basketball league ran by the NBA in the United States just following the 2010 NBA draft. Teams consisted of players who have been in the league for three years or fewer as well as newly drafted talent. It gives rookies a chance to practice against other players that are new to the NBA. All 30 NBA teams participated besides an NBA D-League Select team so the total number of teams is 31 with each team playing 5 games except Sacramento Kings which played 6 games. It was held in Las Vegas, Nevada and Orlando, Florida from July 5 through July 18. 2010.

2012 NBA Summer League

The 2012 NBA Summer League was a pro basketball league run by the NBA just after the 2012 NBA Draft. It took place in Orlando, Florida from July 9 to 13 and in Las Vegas, Nevada from July 13 to 22, 2012. Damian Lillard (Portland Trail Blazers) and Josh Selby (Memphis Grizzlies) won the MVP honors.

2013 NBA Summer League

The 2013 NBA Summer League is a pro basketball league run by the NBA just after the 2013 NBA draft. It gives newly drafted players a chance to test their skills against each other, and to give them a feel for professional basketball. All 30 NBA teams participated, along with the D-League Select. The Miami Heat were the only team to participate in both Summer Leagues. It ran from July 7–12 in Orlando and July 12–22 in Las Vegas. Jeremy Lamb of the Oklahoma City Thunder was named the Most Valuable Player of the Orlando Summer League. Jonas Valančiūnas of the Toronto Raptors went on to be named the Most Valuable Player of the Las Vegas Summer League. Ian Clark of the Golden State Warriors was named the Most Valuable Player of the Las Vegas Summer League Championship Game.

2014 NBA Summer League

The 2014 NBA Summer League consists of two pro basketball leagues organized by the NBA and the Orlando Magic just after the 2014 NBA Draft. Ten teams took part in the week-long summer league at the Amway Center in Orlando, Florida, from July 5 to 11, 2014. The other summer league was the Las Vegas NBA Summer League, having taken place at the Thomas & Mack Center and Cox Pavilion in Paradise, Nevada (near Las Vegas) from July 11 to 21, 2014, with 23 NBA teams and the NBA D-League Select team participating. The Houston Rockets, Miami Heat and Philadelphia 76ers participated in both leagues.

The Philadelphia 76ers won the Orlando Pro Summer League Championship by defeating the Memphis Grizzlies in the title game, 91–75. Elfrid Payton was named the league's most valuable player.The Sacramento Kings won the Las Vegas NBA Summer League Championship by defeating the Houston Rockets in the title game, 77–68. Glen Rice, Jr. of the Washington Wizards was named the league's most valuable player. Ray McCallum of the Kings was named the most valuable player of the championship game.

2015 NBA Summer League

The 2015 NBA Summer League consisted of three pro basketball leagues organized by the NBA: the Orlando Pro Summer League, Utah Jazz Summer League, and Las Vegas Summer League.Ten teams participated in the week-long Orlando Pro Summer League at Amway Center in Orlando, Florida, from July 4 to 10, 2015. The Memphis Grizzlies won the Orlando Pro Summer League Championship over the Orlando Magic White team, 75-73, on a buzzer-beater floater by Russ Smith in double overtime. Aaron Gordon of the Orlando Magic was named the league's Most Valuable Player. The Miami Heat and Brooklyn Nets also participated in the Las Vegas Summer League.

The Utah Jazz Summer League was introduced for the first time in 2015, marking the first summer league to be played in Utah since the Rocky Mountain Revue was last held in 2008. Four teams participated in a round-robin format from July 6 to 9, 2015. No tournament was held, nor was there a champion named, but the Utah Jazz had the best record of the four teams, as they went undefeated with a 3-0 record. All four teams (Utah Jazz, Boston Celtics, Philadelphia 76ers, and San Antonio Spurs) also participated in the Las Vegas Summer League.

The Las Vegas NBA Summer League is the official summer league of the NBA. It is the premier summer league of the three, with a total of 23 teams, plus a Select Team from the NBA Development League, participating. A total of 67 games were played from July 10 to 20, 2015, across two different venues, the Thomas & Mack Center and Cox Pavilion, both located in Paradise, Nevada (near Las Vegas). The San Antonio Spurs won the Championship by defeating the Phoenix Suns in the championship game, 93-90. Kyle Anderson was named the league's Most Valuable Player, with Jonathon Simmons of the Spurs being named the Championship Game MVP. The Spurs championship was historic, as they were coached by Becky Hammon, the first full-time female assistant coach in the NBA.

2016 NBA Summer League

The 2016 NBA Summer League consisted of three pro basketball leagues organized by the National Basketball Association (NBA): the Orlando Pro Summer League, Utah Jazz Summer League, and Las Vegas Summer League.Ten teams participated in the week-long Orlando Pro Summer League at Amway Center in Orlando, Florida, from July 2 to 8, 2016. The Orlando Magic (White) won the Orlando Pro Summer League championship over the Detroit Pistons, 87–84 in overtime. Arinze Onuaku of Orlando Magic (White) was named the MVP. The Dallas Mavericks and Miami Heat also participated in the Las Vegas Summer League.The Utah Jazz Summer League was introduced for the first time last year, marking the first summer league to be played in Utah since the Rocky Mountain Revue was last held in 2008. Four teams participated in a round-robin format from July 4 to 7, 2016. No tournament was held, nor was there a champion named, but the Boston Celtics had the best record of the four teams with an undefeated record of 3–0. All four teams (Utah Jazz, Boston Celtics, Philadelphia 76ers, and San Antonio Spurs) also participated in the Las Vegas Summer League.The Las Vegas NBA Summer League is the official summer league of the National Basketball Association. It is the premier summer league of the three, with a total of 23 teams, plus a Select Team from the NBA Development League, participating. A total of 67 games were played from July 8 to 18, 2016, at the Thomas & Mack Center and Cox Pavilion, both located in Paradise, Nevada (near Las Vegas). The Chicago Bulls won the championship by defeating the Minnesota Timberwolves in the final, 84–82, on a buzzer-beater by Denzel Valentine in overtime. Tyus Jones was named the league's Most Valuable Player, with Jerian Grant of the Bulls being named the championship game MVP.

2017 NBA Summer League

The 2017 NBA Summer League consisted of three pro basketball leagues organized by the National Basketball Association (NBA): the Orlando Pro Summer League, Utah Jazz Summer League, and Las Vegas Summer League.Eight teams participated in the week-long Orlando Pro Summer League at Amway Center in Orlando, Florida, from July 1 to 6, 2017. Each team played five games over the course of the week, with a championship day being played on the final day of the league. The Dallas Mavericks and Miami Heat also participated in the Las Vegas Summer League.Four teams participated in the round-robin format of the Utah Jazz Summer League from July 3 to 6, 2017. All four teams (Utah Jazz, Boston Celtics, Philadelphia 76ers, and San Antonio Spurs) also participated in the Las Vegas Summer League.The Las Vegas NBA Summer League is the official summer league of the National Basketball Association. It is the premier summer league of the three, with a total of 24 participating. A total of 67 games was played from July 7 to 17, 2017, at the Thomas & Mack Center and Cox Pavilion, both located in Paradise, Nevada (near Las Vegas).

2018 NBA Summer League

The 2018 NBA Summer League consisted of three pro basketball leagues organized by the National Basketball Association (NBA): the Sacramento Kings's California Classic Summer League, Utah Jazz Summer League, and Las Vegas Summer League.

The Sacramento Kings hosted their own summer league event called the California Classic at the Golden 1 Center in Sacramento. The event was scheduled to take place before the Las Vegas Summer League began, with the teams in place for the event involving the Kings, Los Angeles Lakers, Golden State Warriors, and Miami Heat. Eight days later, the Kings confirmed that their own Summer League event (titled the California Classic Summer League) would take place July 2–5, 2018 (taking a day off to celebrate the Fourth of July), replacing the Orlando Pro Summer League. On May 14, 2018, the Kings confirmed that report.Four teams participated in the round-robin format of the Utah Jazz Summer League from July 2 to July 5, 2018. All four teams (Utah Jazz, Atlanta Hawks, Memphis Grizzlies, and San Antonio Spurs) also participated in the Las Vegas Summer League.The 2018 Las Vegas NBA Summer League was the official 2018 summer league of the National Basketball Association. The league was held at the Thomas and Mack Center and Cox Pavilion in Las Vegas, Nevada, on the campus of University of Nevada, Las Vegas. It began on July 6 and ended on July 17. For the first time in league history, all 30 teams participated. With every team participating, the event expanded to 82 games in 12 days. Teams competed in a tournament-style schedule in three preliminary games before seeding in a tournament; each team played at least five games and as many as eight games. The event concluded with the 2018 NBA Summer League Championship game on July 17.

2019 NBA Summer League

The 2019 NBA Summer League was held at the Thomas and Mack Center and Cox Pavilion in Las Vegas, Nevada on the campus of University of Nevada, Las Vegas. It began on July 5 and ended on July 15. All 30 teams and two national teams, China and Croatia, participated. Teams will compete in a tournament-style schedule in four preliminary games before seeding in a tournament; each team will play at least five games and as many as seven games. The event will conclude with the 2019 NBA Summer League Championship game on July 15.

Alan Williams (basketball)

Alan Travis Williams (born January 28, 1993) is an American professional basketball player for the Shaanxi Xinda of the National Basketball League (NBL). He played college basketball for UC Santa Barbara before beginning his professional career with the Qingdao DoubleStar Eagles of the Chinese Basketball Association in 2015.

Alex Caruso

Alex Caruso (born February 28, 1994) is an American professional basketball player for the Los Angeles Lakers of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He played college basketball for the Texas A&M Aggies, earning second-team all-conference honors in the Southeastern Conference (SEC) as a senior in 2016.

Cox Pavilion

Cox Pavilion is a 78,300-square-foot (7,270 m2), multi-purpose indoor arena on the University of Nevada, Las Vegas campus, connected to the Thomas & Mack Center. The Pavilion serves as the home court for UNLV Lady Rebels women's basketball and volleyball programs as well as the annual NBA Summer League.

Cox Communications and UNLV formed a partnership for the new facility in 2001. The arena cost $16.8 million. As part of a $5 million agreement, Cox Communications secured the naming rights for the facility as well as opportunities for sponsorship and hospitality.

The pavilion is a two-level structure. The ground floor features new men's and women's locker facilities, player lounges and practice courts for basketball and volleyball. The top level is a multi-purpose venue with a seating capacity of 2,500 to 3,100 for sporting events.

In addition to UNLV athletic events, the Cox Pavilion hosts a variety of events, including small concerts, boxing events, theater-style family shows, corporate parties, trade shows and more.

On November 15, 2007, the arena hosted the Democratic Presidential Debate for the 2008 presidential election.

Dwayne Collins

Dwayne Collins (born April 13, 1988) is an American former college basketball player. A power forward, Collins played college basketball for the University of Miami before being selected with the final pick in the 2010 NBA draft by the Phoenix Suns. He later signed with Italian team Cimberio Varese for the 2010–11 season but he was let go prior to the start of the season after sustaining a knee injury. Due to the knee injury, Collins' next stint came in July 2013 when he joined the Suns for the 2013 NBA Summer League. In five games for the Suns, he averaged 1.2 points in 5.3 minutes per game.

Edo Murić

Edo Murić (born November 27, 1991) is a Slovenian professional basketball player for Cedevita Olimpija of the ABA League and the EuroCup. He also represents the Slovenian national team. Standing at 2.02 m (6 ft 8 in), he plays the small forward position.

Mitchell Watt (basketball)

Mitchell Watt (born December 14, 1989) is an American professional basketball player for Reyer Venezia of the Italian Lega Basket Serie A (LBA). He played college basketball for the University at Buffalo, where he was an All-American and Mid-American Conference (MAC) player of the year.

Reebok Pro Summer League

The Reebok Pro Summer League, known originally as the Shaw's Pro Summer League, was a professional basketball developmental league hosted by the Boston Celtics of the National Basketball Association (NBA) during the league's off-season at Clark Athletic Center on the campus of the University of Massachusetts Boston. Founded in 1999, the league planned a 2004 season, but was forced to fold due to the 2004 Democratic National Convention, which was being held in Boston. From 1999 to 2002, the league was sponsored by grocery store chain Shaw's. In 2003, footwear and apparel company Reebok became the title sponsor of the league.

Summer Pro League

The Summer Pro League (SPL), formerly known as the Southern California Summer Pro League, was a basketball league held every summer in Long Beach, California. The SPL moved to the Walter Pyramid on the campus of Long Beach State in 1995. Before then, it was held at various sites in the Los Angeles Metropolitan Area, including UCLA, Loyola Marymount University, and Pepperdine University. The league was founded in 1969.While not run by the National Basketball Association (NBA), the league previously hosted NBA teams with their first and second round draft picks, undrafted players, and free agents. Due to the NBA lockout in 1998, no NBA teams were entered into the league that year. Due to the rising popularity of the Las Vegas Summer League, 2006 was the last year the NBA sent teams to the SPL. 2007 was the SPL's final year in operation, during which the league played with amateur teams.

Winthrop Eagles men's basketball

The Winthrop Eagles men's basketball team represents Winthrop University in Rock Hill, South Carolina, United States and competes in the Big South Conference. The Eagles hired former Xavier assistant coach Pat Kelsey in 2012 as men's basketball head coach to replace Randy Peele. Winthrop plays their home games in the 6,100 seat Winthrop Coliseum. Winthrop has appeared in ten NCAA Tournaments and has won 19 conference championships (season and tournament). The Eagles have played 38 seasons of basketball since their inaugural 1978–79 campaign.

Ángel Rodríguez (basketball)

Ángel Daniel Rodríguez Tricoche (born December 5, 1992) is a Puerto Rican professional basketball player who last played for the Rio Grande Valley Vipers of the NBA G League. He played college basketball for Kansas State University and the University of Miami.

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