NBA Showtime

NBA Showtime is the pregame show aired before each NBA on NBC telecast. The program, a half-hour in length, began during the 1990–91 NBA season, and was initially hosted by Bob Costas. Costas left in the mid-1990s, and became lead play-by-play voice of The NBA on NBC in 1997. Hannah Storm replaced Costas and hosted Showtime until Ahmad Rashād replaced her as host of the pregame show when Storm went on maternity leave in 2001. Storm returned in 2002 which meant that her and Rashad would alternate as hosts throughout the season. NBC kept the title of Showtime prior to the 2000–01 NBA season.

Showtime analysts included:

Midway Games created an NBA Showtime arcade game in 1999. The game was an update to the NBA Jam series, and used the same opening music and presentation style as the television show.

Programming change

On March 3, 1991, the Insiders segment was cancelled and replaced by a report of breaking news: a plane had crashed in Security-Widefield, Colorado. All aboard were killed in a crash that was caused by wind shear. Because Operation Desert Storm had just ended, Costas emphasized that the story had nothing to do with events in Iraq.

See also

Grantland Basketball Hour

The Grantland Basketball Hour is a primetime show on ESPN, ESPN2, and ESPN on ABC in which sports and pop culture journalist, Bill Simmons and sports media journalist Jalen Rose discuss current events surrounding the NBA. The show began on October 21, 2014, and was contracted by ESPN for 18 episodes to cover the 2014–15 NBA season.

Kerri Hoskins

Kerri Ann Hoskins Reavis (born February 20, 1970 in Cambridge, Minnesota) is a former glamour model and video game actress.

NBA Coast to Coast

NBA Coast to Coast (formerly known as NBA Fastbreak Tuesday and NBA Nation) was a weekly NBA-themed studio program which aired Tuesday nights on ESPN2.

NBA Entertainment

NBA Entertainment is the production arm of the National Basketball Association and produces many NBA-related films including team championship videos and blooper and entertainment reels. It used to be associated with CBS/Fox Video before changing its distribution partner to Warner Bros. (whose Turner Sports division runs its website and is one of its major broadcast partners).

NBA Entertainment founded in 1982.

NBA Friday

NBA Friday is a weekly presentation of National Basketball Association games on ESPN. Formerly known as NBA Friday Coast to Coast during doubleheader nights, the program starts the first Friday of the NBA season, and typically runs uninterrupted throughout the entire season. In 2006, NBA Friday was preempted from March 10 to March 31, due to ESPN deciding against counter programming the NCAA Tournament. Nearly all NBA Friday telecasts consist of a doubleheader, with one game typically from the east coast at 8:00 p.m and the west coast at 10:30 p.m.

The KIA NBA Shootaround Pregame Show, the Toyota Halftime Show, and the Target Postgame Show are the studio shows that occur before, during, and after the NBA Friday Games.

NBA Friday on ESPN is not exclusive; local sports networks may still air the game in their market. In that case, the ESPN broadcast on these markets is subject to blackout and SportsCenter is usually aired instead.

NBA Hangtime

NBA Hangtime is a basketball video game developed and published by Midway and released in arcades in 1996. Home versions were released for the Nintendo 64, PlayStation, SNES, Sega Mega Drive/Genesis, and Microsoft Windows. A version for Game.com was cancelled.

Hangtime was the third basketball game by the original development team behind the NBA Jam series. The title was changed due to the NBA Jam name being acquired by Acclaim Entertainment, the publisher of the games for the home market. Acclaim's NBA Jam Extreme was released the same year as Hangtime. Features introduced in Hangtime included character creation, alley oops, and double dunks. A software update known as NBA Maximum Hangtime was released for the arcades later in the life cycle. A sequel, NBA Showtime: NBA on NBC, was released in 1999.

The theme song "Whatcha Gonna Do?" was produced by rapper M-Doc of Indasoul Entertainment.

NBA Hoopz

NBA Hoopz is a basketball video game by Midway. This game is the trilogy of NBA Hangtime and NBA Showtime: NBA on NBC. Hoopz was the only 3-on-3, arcade-style basketball video game available during the 2000–01 NBA season. This would be the final basketball video game released for the company as Midway put more focus on the Mortal Kombat series before getting acquisition under Warner Bros. Interactive in 2010.

NBA Jam

NBA Jam (sometimes "Jam" for short) is a long-running basketball video game series based on the National Basketball Association (NBA). Initially developed as arcade games by Midway, the game found popularity with its photorealistic digitized graphics, over-the-top presentation and exaggerated style of two-on-two basketball play. The successor to Midway's Arch Rivals, the original 1993 NBA Jam allowed players to jump many times above their own height, make slam dunks that defy human capabilities, and freely shove or elbow opponents out of the way. It also featured a variety of secret characters, as well as the ability to track player records and statistics between play sessions.

After the release of NBA Jam Tournament Edition, Acclaim, the publishers of the home versions of the Jam games acquired exclusive rights to release games under the NBA Jam name. Acclaim released one arcade game, NBA Jam Extreme, featuring the trademark over-the-top style of the previous games. Meanwhile, Midway continued its own series of NBA games with NBA Hangtime. After NBA Jam Extreme, Acclaim started publishing titles exclusive to home consoles with a more realistic style. Acclaim then attempted to return the series to its arcade roots with one more console game, 2003's NBA Jam, before the company closed its doors in 2004.

6 years later, Electronic Arts acquired the rights to the name and in 2010 they released NBA Jam for the Wii, PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360. The game was an attempt to replicate the original Midway games on newer consoles and original lead designer/programmer Mark Turmell was consulted on its development.

NBA TV Canada

NBA TV Canada is a Canadian pay television channel that is owned by Maple Leaf Sports & Entertainment (MLSE). It is a Canadian version of NBA TV, broadcasting programming focused on the National Basketball Association, and its Canadian franchise, the Toronto Raptors.

NBA Tonight

NBA Tonight is a National Basketball Association studio program that airs on ESPN. The program used to air as part of ESPN's The Trifecta. Formerly known as NBA 2Night and NBA Fastbreak, the program, hosted by various ESPN personalities, provides highlights, analysis and updates from the night's NBA games. Segments include "3Ds", which looks at the night's top dunks, defense and dimes (assists).

NBA Wednesday

NBA Wednesday is a weekly presentation of the National Basketball Association on ESPN. Debuting in 2002, NBA Wednesday starts the first Wednesday of the NBA season and runs throughout the entire season. Games typically air at 9:00 p.m EST, following an ESPN's presentation of ACC Wednesday college basketball. NBA Wednesday is occasionally preempted by ACC Wednesday or other college basketball doubleheaders, as well as Wednesday Night Baseball.

NBA Wednesday, like NBA Friday, is not exclusive; local sports networks may still air the game in their market. In that case, the ESPN broadcast on these markets is subject to blackout and SportsCenter is usually aired instead.

NBA on NBC

The NBA on NBC is the branding used for presentations of National Basketball Association (NBA) games produced by the NBC television network in the United States. NBC held broadcast rights from 1955 to 1962 and again from 1990 (when it obtained the rights from CBS) to 2002. During NBC's partnership with the NBA in the 1990s, the league rose to unprecedented popularity, with ratings surpassing the days of Magic Johnson and Larry Bird in the mid-1980s.

NBA on SNI

The NBA on SNI refers to National Basketball Association television coverage on the now defunct television network known as Sports Network Incorporated (later known as the Hughes Television Network). Coverage began in the 1962-63 season (after the NBA's deal with NBC ended) and lasted through the 1963-64 season (when the NBA entered an agreement with ABC).

PlayStation Multitap

The PlayStation Multitap is a peripheral for the PlayStation console. It is an adapter that can be used to plug in up to four controllers and memory cards at the same time in a single controller port. With a second multitap, up to eight controllers and memory cards can be plugged at once.

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