NBA Rookie of the Year Award

The National Basketball Association's Rookie of the Year Award is an annual National Basketball Association (NBA) award given to the top rookie(s) of the regular season. Initiated following the 1952–53 NBA season, it confers the Eddie Gottlieb Trophy, named after the former Philadelphia Warriors head coach.

The winner is selected by a panel of United States and Canadian sportswriters and broadcasters,[1] each casting first, second, and third place votes (worth five points, three points, and one point respectively). The player(s) with the highest point total, regardless of the number of first-place votes, wins the award.[2]

The most recent Rookie of the Year winner is Ben Simmons. Twenty-one winners were drafted first overall. There has only been one winner taken in the second round of the draft, Malcolm Brogdon, who was taken 36th overall by the Milwaukee Bucks in the 2016 draft. Sixteen winners have also won the NBA Most Valuable Player (MVP) award in their careers; Wilt Chamberlain and Wes Unseld earning both honors the same season. Nineteen of the forty two non-active winners have been elected to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. Three seasons had joint winners—Dave Cowens and Geoff Petrie in the 1970–71 season, Grant Hill and Jason Kidd in the 1994–95 season, and Elton Brand and Steve Francis in the 1999–2000 season.[3] Five players won the award unanimously (by capturing all of the first-place votes) – Ralph Sampson, David Robinson, Blake Griffin, Damian Lillard, and Karl-Anthony Towns.[4]

Patrick Ewing of Jamaica,[5] Pau Gasol of Spain, Kyrie Irving and Ben Simmons of Australia and Andrew Wiggins of Canada are the only winners not born in the United States. Three of these individuals have dual nationality by birth—Wiggins and Simmons have American fathers, and both of Irving's parents are Americans. Ewing immigrated to the Boston area at age 11, Irving moved to the United States at age 2, and Wiggins and Simmons moved to the U.S. while in high school. Gasol is the only winner trained totally outside the U.S.

Winners

Larrybird
Larry Bird won the award in the 1979–80 NBA season.
Jordan by Lipofsky 16577
Michael Jordan won the award in the 1984–85 NBA season.
Allen Iverson Lipofsky
Allen Iverson won the award in the 1996–97 NBA season.
Pau Gasol boxout
Pau Gasol won the award in the 2001–02 NBA season.
LebronFT (cropped)
LeBron James won the award in the 2003–04 NBA season.
Kevin Durant
Kevin Durant won the award in the 2007–08 NBA season.
Derrick Rose 2
Derrick Rose won the award in the 2008–09 NBA season.
Key
^ Denotes player who is still active in the NBA
* Elected to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame
dagger Denotes unanimous winners
DP # Draft pick number
DY Draft year
T Territorial pick
Rookie of the Year
Season Player Position Nationality Team DP # DY
1952–53 Don Meineke Forward/Center  United States Fort Wayne Pistons 12 1952
1953–54 Ray Felix Center  United States Baltimore Bullets 1 1953
1954–55 Bob Pettit* Forward/Center  United States Milwaukee Hawks 2 1954
1955–56 Maurice Stokes* Forward/Center  United States Rochester Royals 2 1955
1956–57 Tom Heinsohn* Forward  United States Boston Celtics T 1956
1957–58 Woody Sauldsberry Forward/Center  United States Philadelphia Warriors 60 1957
1958–59 Elgin Baylor* Forward  United States Minneapolis Lakers 1 1958
1959–60 Wilt Chamberlain*[a] Center  United States Philadelphia Warriors T 1959
1960–61 Oscar Robertson* Guard  United States Cincinnati Royals 1/T 1960
1961–62 Walt Bellamy* Center  United States Chicago Packers 1 1961
1962–63 Terry Dischinger Forward/Guard  United States Chicago Zephyrs 8 1962
1963–64 Jerry Lucas*[b] Forward/Center  United States Cincinnati Royals T 1962[b]
1964–65 Willis Reed* Center/Forward  United States New York Knicks 8 1964
1965–66 Rick Barry* Forward  United States San Francisco Warriors 2 1965
1966–67 Dave Bing* Guard  United States Detroit Pistons 2 1966
1967–68 Earl Monroe* Guard  United States Baltimore Bullets 2 1967
1968–69 Wes Unseld*[a] Center/Forward  United States Baltimore Bullets 2 1968
1969–70 Lew Alcindor* Center  United States Milwaukee Bucks 1 1969
1970–71[c] Dave Cowens* Center/Forward  United States Boston Celtics 4 1970
Geoff Petrie Guard  United States Portland Trail Blazers 8 1970
1971–72 Sidney Wicks Forward/Center  United States Portland Trail Blazers 2 1971
1972–73 Bob McAdoo* Center/Forward  United States Buffalo Braves 2 1972
1973–74 Ernie DiGregorio Guard  United States Buffalo Braves 3 1973
1974–75 Jamaal Wilkes* Forward/Guard  United States Golden State Warriors 11 1974
1975–76 Alvan Adams Center/Forward  United States Phoenix Suns 4 1975
1976–77 Adrian Dantley* Forward/Guard  United States Buffalo Braves 6 1976
1977–78 Walter Davis Guard/Forward  United States Phoenix Suns 5 1977
1978–79 Phil Ford Guard  United States Kansas City Kings 2 1978
1979–80 Larry Bird*[d] Forward  United States Boston Celtics 6 1978[d]
1980–81 Darrell Griffith Guard  United States Utah Jazz 2 1980
1981–82 Buck Williams Forward/Center  United States New Jersey Nets 3 1981
1982–83 Terry Cummings Forward  United States San Diego Clippers 2 1982
1983–84 Ralph Sampson*dagger Center/Forward  United States Houston Rockets 1 1983
1984–85 Michael Jordan* Guard  United States Chicago Bulls 3 1984
1985–86 Patrick Ewing* Center  United States[e] New York Knicks 1 1985
1986–87 Chuck Person Forward  United States Indiana Pacers 4 1986
1987–88 Mark Jackson Guard  United States New York Knicks 18 1987
1988–89 Mitch Richmond* Guard  United States Golden State Warriors 5 1988
1989–90 David Robinson*dagger[f] Center  United States San Antonio Spurs 1 1987[f]
1990–91 Derrick Coleman Forward  United States New Jersey Nets 1 1990
1991–92 Larry Johnson Forward  United States Charlotte Hornets 1 1991
1992–93 Shaquille O'Neal* Center  United States Orlando Magic 1 1992
1993–94 Chris Webber Forward/Center  United States Golden State Warriors 1 1993
1994–95[c] Grant Hill* Forward/Guard  United States Detroit Pistons 3 1994
Jason Kidd* Guard  United States Dallas Mavericks 2 1994
1995–96 Damon Stoudamire Guard  United States Toronto Raptors 7 1995
1996–97 Allen Iverson* Guard  United States Philadelphia 76ers 1 1996
1997–98 Tim Duncan Forward/Center  United States[g] San Antonio Spurs 1 1997
1998–99 Vince Carter^ Guard/Forward  United States Toronto Raptors 5 1998
1999–00[c] Elton Brand Forward  United States Chicago Bulls 1 1999
Steve Francis Guard  United States Houston Rockets 2 1999
2000–01 Mike Miller Forward/Guard  United States Orlando Magic 5 2000
2001–02 Pau Gasol^ Forward/Center  Spain Memphis Grizzlies 3 2001
2002–03 Amar'e Stoudemire Forward/Center  United States Phoenix Suns 9 2002
2003–04 LeBron James^ Forward  United States Cleveland Cavaliers 1 2003
2004–05 Emeka Okafor^ Center/Forward  United States Charlotte Bobcats 2 2004
2005–06 Chris Paul^ Guard  United States New Orleans/Oklahoma City Hornets 4 2005
2006–07 Brandon Roy Guard  United States Portland Trail Blazers 6 2006
2007–08 Kevin Durant^ Forward  United States Seattle SuperSonics 2 2007
2008–09 Derrick Rose^ Guard  United States Chicago Bulls 1 2008
2009–10 Tyreke Evans^ Guard/Forward  United States Sacramento Kings 4 2009
2010–11 Blake Griffin^dagger[h] Forward  United States Los Angeles Clippers 1 2009[h]
2011–12 Kyrie Irving^ Guard  United States Cleveland Cavaliers 1 2011
2012–13 Damian Lillard^dagger Guard  United States Portland Trail Blazers 6 2012
2013–14 Michael Carter-Williams^ Guard  United States Philadelphia 76ers 11 2013
2014–15 Andrew Wiggins^ Forward/Guard  Canada Minnesota Timberwolves 1 2014
2015–16 Karl-Anthony Towns^dagger Center  United States[i] Minnesota Timberwolves 1 2015
2016–17 Malcolm Brogdon^ Guard  United States Milwaukee Bucks 36 2016
2017–18 Ben Simmons^ Forward/Guard  Australia Philadelphia 76ers 1 2016[j]

Unofficial winners

Prior to the 1952–53 season, the Rookie of the Year was selected by newspaper writers;[18] however, the NBA does not officially recognize those players as winners. The league did publish the pre-1953 winners in their 1994–95 edition of the Official NBA Guide and the 1994 Official NBA Basketball Encyclopedia, but those winners have not been listed in subsequent publications.[18][19][20]

Season Player Position Nationality Team DP # DY
1947–48 Paul Hoffman Guard/Forward  United States Baltimore Bullets 70 1947
1948–49 Howie Shannon Guard/Forward  United States Providence Steamrollers 1 1949
1949–50 Alex Groza Center  United States Indianapolis Olympians 2 1949
1950–51 Paul Arizin* Forward/Guard  United States Philadelphia Warriors T 1950
1951–52[c] Bill Tosheff Guard  United States Indianapolis Olympians 32 1951
Mel Hutchins Forward/Center  United States Milwaukee Hawks 2 1951

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b Won the NBA Most Valuable Player Award in same year.
  2. ^ a b Though drafted in 1962 by the Cincinnati Royals, Jerry Lucas did not sign with the team until 1963 when he tried to sign with the Cleveland Pipers of the American Basketball League instead. He ended up sitting out the year when the deal fell through. His rookie season with the Royals began in the 1963–64 season.[6]
  3. ^ a b c d Denotes seasons in which joint winners were named
  4. ^ a b Though drafted in 1978 by the Boston Celtics, Larry Bird, opted to stay in college for his senior year, did not play in the NBA until 1979. His rookie season with the Celtics began in the 1979–80 season.[7]
  5. ^ Patrick Ewing was born in Jamaica, but had become a naturalized United States citizen while playing college basketball at Georgetown.[8] He represented the United States at the 1984 Summer Olympics.[9]
  6. ^ a b Though drafted in 1987 by the San Antonio Spurs, David Robinson did not play in the NBA until 1989 due to commitments to the United States Navy.[10] His rookie season with the Spurs began in the 1989–90 season.[11]
  7. ^ Because Tim Duncan is a United States citizen by birth, as are all natives of the U.S. Virgin Islands,[12] he was able to play for the U.S. internationally. He represented the United States at the 2004 Summer Olympics[13]
  8. ^ a b Though drafted in 2009 by the Los Angeles Clippers, Blake Griffin missed the entire 2009–10 season due to a knee injury. His rookie season with the Clippers was the 2010–11 season.[14]
  9. ^ Karl-Anthony Towns was born and raised in the United States to an American father and a Dominican mother.[15] He has represented the Dominican Republic internationally since 2012.[16]
  10. ^ Though drafted in 2016 by the Philadelphia 76ers, Ben Simmons missed the entire 2016–17 season due to his broken right foot. His rookie season with the Sixers was the 2017–18 season.[17]

References

General
  • "Rookie of the Year Award". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. Retrieved April 27, 2007.
  • "Rookie of the Year Award Winners". basketball-reference.com. Retrieved July 7, 2008.
Specific
  1. ^ "Wolves' Towns named 2015-16 Kia Rookie of the Year". NBA.com. May 16, 2016. Retrieved November 21, 2016.
  2. ^ "Trail Blazers' Brandon Roy Named 2006-07 T-Mobile NBA Rookie of the Year". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. May 3, 2007. Retrieved July 10, 2008.
  3. ^ "Brand, Francis named NBA co-rookies of the year". CBC Sports. November 10, 2000. Retrieved July 13, 2008.
  4. ^ "It's unanimous: Karl-Anthony Towns gets every first-place vote for Rookie of the Year". StarTribune.com. Minneapolis Star Tribune. May 16, 2016. Retrieved May 16, 2016.
  5. ^ "Bargnani becomes first European top NBA draft pick". People's Daily Online. June 29, 2006. Retrieved June 16, 2008.
  6. ^ "Jerry Lucas Bio". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. Retrieved July 13, 2008.
  7. ^ "Larry Bird Bio". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. Retrieved July 13, 2008.
  8. ^ Ralph Wiley (January 7, 1985). "The Master Of The Key: After years of relying on others to unlock doors for him, Georgetown's center Patrick Ewing will soon go off on his own". Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on September 8, 2008. Retrieved June 16, 2008.
  9. ^ "All-Time USA Basketball Men's Roster: E". USA Basketball. Archived from the original on August 4, 2008. Retrieved July 13, 2008.
  10. ^ Dave Anderson (May 18, 1987). "Sports of the Times; The Robinson Plot Thickens". The New York Times. Retrieved June 16, 2008.
  11. ^ "David Robinson". basketball-reference.com. Retrieved June 20, 2008.
  12. ^ "Virgin Islands". CIA World Factbook. Retrieved August 12, 2008.
  13. ^ "All-Time USA Basketball Men's Roster: D". USA Basketball. Archived from the original on August 28, 2009. Retrieved June 16, 2008.
  14. ^ "Griffin's rookie season lost to injury". ESPN.com. January 13, 2010. Retrieved January 13, 2010.
  15. ^ Zgoda, Jerry (June 26, 2015). "Karl-Anthony Towns taken No.1 by Wolves; Tyus Jones acquired in trade with Cavaliers". Star Tribune. Retrieved June 26, 2015.
  16. ^ "Calipari makes Dominican team roster cuts". WKYT. June 16, 2012. Retrieved June 26, 2015.
  17. ^ "Philadelphia 76ers announce Ben Simmons done for season". NBA.com. 24 February 2017. Retrieved 24 February 2017.
  18. ^ a b Friedman, David (March 2, 2009). "Bill Tosheff: NBA Co-Rookie of the Year and Tireless Advocate for the "Pre-1965ers". 20 Second Timeout. Retrieved September 1, 2011.
  19. ^ Goldstein, Allan (October 30, 1994). "NBA forgot it honored Hoffman". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved September 1, 2011.
  20. ^ Sachare, Alex (1994). The Official NBA Basketball Encyclopedia. New York: Villard Books. p. 371. ISBN 978-0-679-43293-7.
1954–55 Milwaukee Hawks season

The 1954–55 NBA season was the Hawks' sixth season in the NBA and the fourth and final season in Milwaukee.There would not be another NBA franchise in Milwaukee, until the Bucks began play in 1968.

1955–56 Rochester Royals season

The 1955–56 NBA season was the Royals eighth season in the NBA.

1964–65 New York Knicks season

The 1964-65 NBA season was the Knicks' 19th season in the NBA.

1968–69 Princeton Tigers men's basketball team

The 1968–69 Princeton Tigers men's basketball team represented the Princeton University in intercollegiate college basketball during the 1968–69 NCAA University Division men's basketball season. The head coach was Pete Carril and the team captain was Christopher Thomforde. The team played its home games in the Dillon Gymnasium on the university campus before the January 25, 1969, opening of Jadwin Gymnasium on the university campus in Princeton, New Jersey. The team was the champion of the Ivy League, which earned them an invitation to the 25-team 1969 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament. The team was Princeton's first undefeated Ivy League champion, and earned Carril his first of eleven NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament invitations. The team helped Princeton end the decade with a 72.6 winning percentage (188–71), which was the tenth best in the nation.During the regular season, the team played a few of the teams that would eventually participate in the 25-team NCAA tournament: they opened their season against the Villanova Wildcats and later played two of the eventual final four participants (the UCLA Bruins and North Carolina Tar Heels) in the ECAC Holiday Classic at Madison Square Garden in New York City in late December 1968. The team posted a 19–7 overall record and a 14–0 conference record. The team entered the tournament riding an eleven-game winning streak and having won fifteen of their last sixteen games, but they lost their March 8, 1969 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament East Regional first-round game against the St. John's Red Storm 72–63 at Reynolds Coliseum in Raleigh, North Carolina.Both John Hummer and Geoff Petrie were selected to the All-Ivy League first team. Petrie, who led the conference in scoring with a 23.9 average in conference games, was also an All-East selection. Thomforde was selected in the 1969 NBA Draft by the New York Knicks with the 96th overall selection in the 7th round. Hummer led the conference in field goal percentage with 55.4%. Petrie and Hummer would become the only Tiger teammates to both be drafted in the first round of the NBA Draft (in the same draft no less) when they were selected eighth and fifteenth overall in the 1970 NBA Draft by the Portland Trail Blazers and the Buffalo Braves. The two were part of a trio of 1970 NBA first-round draftees from the Ivy League that included number thirteen selection Jim McMillian of Columbia. Hummer was the first NBA draft pick by the expansion Buffalo Braves. Petrie would share the 1971 NBA Rookie of the Year Award with Dave Cowens.Brian Taylor was selected in the 1972 NBA Draft by the Seattle SuperSonics with the 23rd overall selection in the second round while Reggie Bird was selected by the Atlanta Hawks with the 55th overall selection in the fourth round.

1969–70 Princeton Tigers men's basketball team

The 1969–70 Princeton Tigers men's basketball team represented Princeton University in intercollegiate college basketball during the 1969–70 NCAA University Division men's basketball season. The head coach was Pete Carril and the team co-captains were John Hummer and Geoff Petrie. The team played its home games in the Jadwin Gymnasium on the university campus in Princeton, New Jersey. The team finished third in the Ivy League and did not participate in either the postseason 1970 National Invitation Tournament or the 1970 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament. The team helped Princeton end the decade with a 72.6 winning percentage (188–71), which was the tenth best in the nation.During the regular season, the team played a few of the teams that would eventually participate in the 25-team NCAA tournament: Villanova and eventual champion UCLA as well as conference rival Penn twice. The team's schedule included victories over Maryland and Indiana. The team posted a 16–9 overall record and a 9–5 conference record.Although Hummer repeated as an All-Ivy League first team selection, Petrie failed to do so and was a second team selection. However, Petrie was a third team All-American selection by the Basketball News and repeated as an All-East selection. Petrie and Hummer were the only Tiger teammates to both be drafted in the first round of the NBA Draft (in the same draft no less) when they were selected eighth and fifteenth overall in the 1970 NBA Draft by the Portland Trail Blazers and the Buffalo Braves. The two were part of a trio of 1970 NBA first-round draftees from the Ivy League that included number thirteen selection Jim McMillian of Columbia. Hummer was the first NBA draft pick by the expansion Buffalo Braves. Petrie would share the 1971 NBA Rookie of the Year Award with Dave Cowens. Brian Taylor was selected in the 1972 NBA Draft by the Seattle SuperSonics with the 23rd overall selection in the second round while Reggie Bird was selected by the Atlanta Hawks with the 55th overall selection in the fourth round. Ted Manakas was also selected by the Hawks with the 36th overall selection in the third round of the 1973 NBA Draft.

1984–85 Chicago Bulls season

In the summer of 1984, the team's fortunes changed when it received the third pick of the NBA draft, after Houston and Portland. The Rockets selected Hakeem Olajuwon, the Blazers selected Sam Bowie, and the Bulls picked shooting guard Michael Jordan out of the University of North Carolina.

The team, with new management in owner Jerry Reinsdorf and Jerry Krause in the front office, decided to rebuild around Jordan. Jordan set franchise records during his rookie campaign for scoring (3rd in the league) and steals (4th in the league), and led the Bulls back to the playoffs, for which he was rewarded with a berth on the All-NBA second team and NBA Rookie of the Year Award.

1991 NBA draft

The 1991 NBA draft took place on June 26, 1991, in New York City, New York. Dikembe Mutombo is regarded as the best overall pick in this draft, becoming one of the greatest defensive centers in the history of the league. He was a four-time NBA Defensive Player of the Year award winner and an eight-time All-Star, and played in the league for 18 seasons.Larry Johnson won the 1992 NBA Rookie of the Year award and was a two-time All-Star, the first player to represent the Charlotte Hornets franchise at an All-Star game. However, early in his professional career ongoing back problems decreased his effectiveness and caused his numbers to decline dramatically. Due to his chronic back problems, he retired in 2001.

Other notable picks include Kenny Anderson, Steve Smith, Terrell Brandon, Dale Davis and Chris Gatling, who all made All-Star appearances, but with the exception of Brandon at two, each only appeared once.

The remaining picks in the first round failed to make an impact. Billy Owens was selected by the Sacramento Kings but refused to sign with them. He was traded to the Golden State Warriors in exchange for high-scoring guard Mitch Richmond, a trade that has been regarded as one of the most lopsided in NBA history. Owens was solid but unspectacular in his career, while Richmond was a six-time All-Star and was the 1989 NBA Rookie of the Year. Luc Longley was a three-time NBA Championship winner with the Chicago Bulls and held the record for playing the most NBA games by an Australian (broken by Andrew Bogut during the 2015–16 season).

As of 2011, two players are deceased: Bobby Phills and Bison Dele (drafted as Brian Williams before changing his name). Phills died in a car accident involving teammate David Wesley. Dele disappeared in the South Pacific in July 2002, with French authorities claiming that Dele's brother had killed Dele and his girlfriend and thrown them overboard the catamaran they were travelling on. Dele's brother committed suicide in September 2002.

This was the last draft held in New York City until 2001.

1991–92 Charlotte Hornets season

The 1991–92 NBA season was the Charlotte Hornets' fourth season in the National Basketball Association. With the top overall pick in the 1991 NBA draft, the Hornets selected UNLV star Larry Johnson. Under new head coach Allan Bristow, the Hornets would get off to a slow start losing 8 of their first 9 games. At midseason, Rex Chapman was traded to the Washington Bullets as the Hornets would get stronger winning 9 of 13 games in February, on their way to finishing sixth in the Central Division with a record of 31 wins and 51 losses, a five-game improvement over the previous season. Johnson averaged 19.2 points and 11.0 rebounds per game, as he went on to win the 1992 NBA Rookie of the Year Award. He was also in the Slam Dunk Contest. Second-year star Kendall Gill led the team in scoring with 20.5 points per game. The Hornets led the NBA in attendance for the third time in four seasons.

2008 NBA draft

The 2008 NBA Draft was held on June 26, 2008 at the Washington Mutual Theatre at Madison Square Garden in New York City, New York. In this draft, National Basketball Association (NBA) teams took turns selecting amateur college basketball players and other first-time eligible players, including international players from non-North American professional leagues. According to the NBA, 44 players, 39 collegiate players and five international players, filed as early-entry candidates for the 2008 NBA Draft. These numbers do not include players who are automatically eligible for the draft. The Chicago Bulls, who had a 1.7 percent probability of obtaining the first selection, won the NBA Draft Lottery on May 22. The Bulls' winning of the lottery was the second-largest upset in NBA Draft Lottery history behind the Orlando Magic, who won it in 1993 with just a 1.5% chance. The Miami Heat and the Minnesota Timberwolves obtained the second and third picks respectively.For the first time in draft history the first three draft picks were all freshmen. The Chicago Bulls used the first overall pick to draft Chicago native Derrick Rose from the University of Memphis, who later went on to win the NBA Rookie of the Year Award, making him the first player to be drafted first overall and to win Rookie of the Year since LeBron James in 2003. The Miami Heat used the second pick to draft Michael Beasley from Kansas State University, and the Minnesota Timberwolves used the third pick to draft O. J. Mayo from University of Southern California. With five players taken in the draft, the University of Kansas tied University of Connecticut (2006) and University of Florida (2007) for the record with the most players selected in the first two rounds of an NBA draft. Another record was set when twelve freshmen were drafted, ten of whom were drafted in the first round. Of the players drafted, 29 are forwards, 19 are guards, and 12 are centers.

The 2008 NBA Draft was the final time that the Seattle SuperSonics made an NBA Draft appearance, as well as the final time that the Sonics appeared in official media publications. In early July, the franchise relocated to Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, and was renamed the Oklahoma City Thunder. The Thunder made their first NBA Draft appearance in 2009. This draft also marked the first time that an NBA D-League player was drafted.

2008–09 NBA season

The 2008–09 NBA season was the 63rd season of the National Basketball Association (NBA). The Los Angeles Lakers defeated the Orlando Magic in the 2009 NBA Finals, four games to one.

The 2008 NBA draft was held on June 28, 2008, and Derrick Rose was selected first overall by the Chicago Bulls and eventually awarded the 2009 NBA Rookie of the Year Award. The 2009 NBA All-Star Game was hosted at the US Airways Center in Phoenix. The Western Conference All-Stars defeated the Eastern Conference All-Stars 146–119. The All-Star Game co-MVPs were Shaquille O'Neal and Kobe Bryant.This was the first NBA season since 1966–67 without a Seattle franchise, as the SuperSonics moved to Oklahoma City, Oklahoma in July 2008 and became the Oklahoma City Thunder.

2017 NBA Awards

The 2017 NBA Awards were the first annual awards show by the National Basketball Association (NBA), held on June 26, 2017 at Basketball City at Pier 36 in New York City, New York, and hosted by musician Drake.

Alvan Adams

Alvan Leigh Adams (born July 19, 1954) is an American retired professional basketball player. After starring at the University of Oklahoma, the 6'9" (2.06 m) power forward/center was selected by the Phoenix Suns with the 4th pick of the 1975 NBA draft. Adams was a rookie on a Suns team whose season included an improbable playoff run that took them all the way to the 1976 NBA Finals. In the same year, he was selected to play in the All-Star Game and won the NBA Rookie of the Year Award as well as being named to the All-NBA Rookie Team. Adams spent his entire career with the Suns and retired in 1988 as the second all-time Suns scorer with 13,910 career points.

Brandon Roy

Brandon Dawayne Roy (born July 23, 1984) is an American basketball coach and a former professional basketball player who played for the Portland Trail Blazers and Minnesota Timberwolves in the National Basketball Association (NBA). He was selected sixth in the 2006 NBA draft, having completed four years playing for the Washington Huskies. His nickname was "B-Roy", but he was also referred to as "The Natural" by Trail Blazers announcer Brian Wheeler. On December 10, 2011, Roy announced his retirement from basketball due to a degenerative knee condition, though he returned in 2012 to play five games for the Timberwolves.Born in Seattle, Roy became known for his immediate impact on the Trail Blazers. Zach Randolph, then the team captain, was traded to the New York Knicks at the end of Roy's first season in 2006–07, which cleared the way for Roy to take on a leadership role on the team. That season, Roy won the NBA Rookie of the Year Award in a near-unanimous vote. He was selected as a reserve to the 2008, 2009, and 2010 All-Star games. Roy played the most minutes of any Western Conference player, and tied for the most points in the West in the 2008 season, and he played the most minutes of any player during the 2009 season.

Chris Paul

Christopher Emmanuel Paul (born May 6, 1985) is an American professional basketball player for the Houston Rockets of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He has won the NBA Rookie of the Year Award, an NBA All-Star Game Most Valuable Player Award, two Olympic gold medals, and led the NBA in assists four times and steals six times. He has also been selected to nine NBA All-Star teams, eight All-NBA teams, and nine NBA All-Defensive teams.

Paul was a McDonald's All-American in high school. He attended Wake Forest University for two years of college basketball, where he helped the Demon Deacons achieve their first-ever number one ranking. He was selected fourth overall in the 2005 NBA draft by the New Orleans Hornets, where he developed into one of the league's premier players, finishing second in NBA Most Valuable Player Award voting in 2008. During the 2011 off-season, Paul was traded to the Los Angeles Lakers, only for the transaction to be controversially voided by the NBA. Later that summer, he was dealt to the Los Angeles Clippers instead. Behind Paul's playmaking, the Clippers developed a reputation for their fast-paced offense and spectacular alley-oop dunks, earning them the nickname "Lob City". In 2017, he was traded to the Houston Rockets, and helped the team win a franchise-record 65 games in his debut season.

Off the court, Paul has served as the National Basketball Players Association president since August 2013. One of the highest-paid athletes in the world, he holds endorsement deals with companies such as Nike and State Farm.

Damon Stoudamire

Damon Lamon Stoudamire (born September 3, 1973) is an American retired professional basketball player and the current head men's basketball coach at the University of the Pacific. The 5 ft 10 in (1.78 m), 171 lb (78 kg) point guard was selected with the 7th overall pick by the Toronto Raptors in the 1995 NBA draft and won the 1995–96 NBA Rookie of the Year Award. He played collegiately at the University of Arizona, and professionally for the Toronto Raptors, Portland Trail Blazers, Memphis Grizzlies and San Antonio Spurs. He is the cousin of former Atlanta Hawks and Arizona Wildcats standout Salim Stoudamire and current NBA player Terrence Jones.

IBM Award

The IBM Award was an award given out to National Basketball Association players from 1984 to 2002. The award was sponsored and calculated by technology company IBM and was determined by a computer formula, which measured a player's statistical contribution to his team. The player with the best contribution to his team in the league received the award. The first recipient was Magic Johnson of the Los Angeles Lakers, and the final recipient was Tim Duncan of the San Antonio Spurs.

Most of the players who won the award have been forwards or centers; many finished near the top in rebounding the year they won. The award was given out nineteen times, six times to players on the San Antonio Spurs, three times each to players on the Philadelphia 76ers and Los Angeles Lakers, and twice each to players on the Chicago Bulls and Detroit Pistons. David Robinson won five IBM Awards, Charles Barkley won three, and Michael Jordan and Shaquille O'Neal won two each.As of Grant Hill's selection to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 2018, all IBM Award winners who are eligible for it have been inducted. Jordan, Robinson, Barkley, Johnson, Duncan, Shaquille O’Neal, Karl Malone, and Hakeem Olajuwon also won NBA Most Valuable Player awards during their career; Robinson, O’Neal and Duncan won both awards in the same season. Jordan, Robinson, Olajuwon, Dennis Rodman and Dikembe Mutombo have won the NBA Defensive Player of the Year Award; Olajuwon is the only player to win both in the same season. Hill is the only winner of the IBM Award who did not win an NBA MVP or Defensive Player of the Year Award sometime in his career. O'Neal is the only player to win an IBM Award and an NBA title in the same season; he did this in both the 1999–00 and 2000–01 NBA seasons. Jordan and Robinson are the only players to win the IBM Award during their respective rookie seasons, both also won the NBA Rookie of the Year Award in those years. Two of the award winners were born outside the United States: Olajuwon (Nigeria) and Mutombo (Zaire). Duncan was born in the U.S. Virgin Islands. The award was discontinued in 2002. With Tim Duncan's retirement following the 2015-16 NBA season, there are no more IBM Award winners currently playing in the NBA.

The IBM Award was originally named the Pivotal Player Award and was sponsored by the Schick razor company.

Malcolm Brogdon

Malcolm Moses Adams Brogdon (born December 11, 1992) is an American professional basketball player for the Milwaukee Bucks of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He played college basketball for the Virginia Cavaliers under Tony Bennett. As a senior in 2015–16, he was named the ACC Player of the Year and ACC Defensive Player of the Year, becoming the first player in conference history to earn both honors in the same season. He was selected in the second round of the 2016 NBA draft by the Bucks with the 36th overall pick. He went on to win the NBA Rookie of the Year Award, becoming the first second-round pick in the NBA to win the award since 1966. In the 2018–19 season Brogdon became the eighth player in NBA history to achieve a 50–40–90 season.

NBA 2K19

NBA 2K19 is a basketball simulation video game developed by Visual Concepts and published by 2K Sports, based on the National Basketball Association (NBA). It is the 20th installment in the NBA 2K franchise and the successor to NBA 2K18. Giannis Antetokounmpo of the Milwaukee Bucks is the cover athlete for the standard edition, while LeBron James of the Los Angeles Lakers is the cover athlete for the 20th Anniversary Edition. Antetokounmpo and James grace the cover in North America, while current NBA Rookie of the Year Award winner Ben Simmons of the Philadelphia 76ers, an Australian native, is featured on the cover in Australia and New Zealand.

NBA 2K19 was released on September 11, 2018 for Microsoft Windows, Nintendo Switch, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One. It received generally favorable reviews from critics, who praised the gameplay and some calling it the best installment of the series, while its emphasis on microtransactions was universally criticized. The career mode storyline also features authentic CBA commentary in Mandarin Chinese, a first of the series.

Vince Carter

Vincent Lamar Carter (born January 26, 1977) is an American professional basketball player for the Atlanta Hawks of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He is 6 feet 6 inches (1.98 m) tall and plays both shooting guard and small forward. Carter is one of five players that have played an NBA-record 21 seasons. He is widely regarded as the greatest dunker of all time.A high school McDonald's All-American, Carter played three years at the University of North Carolina. While there, he twice reached the Final Four of the NCAA Tournament before being selected as the fifth overall pick in the 1998 NBA draft by the Golden State Warriors, who traded him to the Toronto Raptors.

Carter emerged as a star in Toronto. He won the 1999 NBA Rookie of the Year Award and won the Slam Dunk Contest at the 2000 NBA All-Star Weekend. That summer, he represented the United States in the Summer Olympics, winning a gold medal. He entertained crowds with his leaping ability and slam dunks, earning nicknames such as "Vinsanity", "Air Canada", and "Half-Man, Half-Amazing". In December 2004, Carter was traded to the New Jersey Nets, where he continued to put up big numbers. Carter has also played for the Orlando Magic, the Phoenix Suns, the Dallas Mavericks, the Memphis Grizzlies, the Sacramento Kings, and the Atlanta Hawks. He received the Twyman–Stokes Teammate of the Year Award in 2016. Carter is an eight-time NBA All-Star.

Off the court, Carter established the Embassy of Hope Foundation, assisting children and their families in Florida, New Jersey and Toronto. He was also recognized in 2000 as Child Advocate of the Year by the Children's Home Society, and received the Florida Governor's Points of Light award in 2007 for his philanthropy in his home state.

National Basketball Association awards and honors
Championship
Individual awards
Honors
NBA Rookie of the Year Award

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