NBA G League

The NBA G League, or simply the G League, is the National Basketball Association's (NBA) official minor league basketball organization. The league was known as the National Basketball Development League (NBDL) from 2001 to 2005, and the NBA Development League (NBA D-League) from 2005 until 2017.[1] The league started with eight teams until NBA commissioner David Stern announced a plan to expand the NBA D-League to fifteen teams and develop it into a true minor league farm system, with each NBA D-League team affiliated with one or more NBA teams in March 2005. At the conclusion of the 2013–14 NBA season, 33% of NBA players had spent time in the NBA D-League, up from 23% in 2011. As of the 2018–19 season, the league consists of 27 teams, all of which are either single-affiliated or owned by an NBA team.

In the 2017–18 season, Gatorade became the title sponsor of the D-League, and it was renamed the NBA G League.[2][1]

NBA G League
Upcoming season or competition:
Current sports event 2018–19 NBA G League season
NBA G League logo
SportBasketball
Founded2001
Inaugural season2001–02
PresidentShareef Abdur-Rahim
No. of teams27 (28 in 2019)
CountryUnited States
Canada
ContinentFIBA Americas (Americas)
Most recent
champion(s)
Austin Spurs (2nd title)
Most titlesAustin Spurs
Rio Grande Valley Vipers
Santa Cruz Warriors
Oklahoma City Blue
(2 titles each)
TV partner(s)
Official websiteGLeague.NBA.com

History

National Basketball Development League (2001–2005)

The league began its play as the National Basketball Development League (NBDL) in the 2001–02 season; the original eight franchises[1][3] were all located in the southeastern United States (specifically in Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Alabama, and Georgia).

NBA Development League (2005–2017)

In 2005, the league's name was changed to NBA Development League (NBA D-League)[1] as part of the new collective bargaining agreement with the NBA and a bid to appeal to more fans by showing their connection to the major league.[4] In the same offseason, Southwest Basketball, LLC led by David Kahn was granted permission by the league to operate four new teams.[5] Southwest Basketball then purchased three existing franchises and one expansion team: the Albuquerque Thunderbirds, Austin Toros, Fort Worth Flyers[6] and the Tulsa 66ers.[7] The Arkansas RimRockers were also added from the ABA for the 2005–06 season. In February 2006, the D-League expanded to California for the first time with the addition of the Bakersfield Jam. Two months later, the league announced that four teams from the Continental Basketball Association were joining the league: the Dakota Wizards, Sioux Falls Skyforce, Idaho Stampede, and a team originally slated for CBA expansion, the Colorado 14ers.[8] Shortly after, the league announced expansion teams in the Anaheim Arsenal[9] and the Los Angeles D-Fenders. The D-Fenders became the first D-League team to be directly owned by an NBA parent team, the Los Angeles Lakers.[10]

However, the westward expansion contributed to the contraction of the NBA-owned Roanoke Dazzle[11] and Fayetteville Patriots for that season.[12] The Florida Flame suspended operations due to arena scheduling difficulties.[13] After the 2006–07 season, there would be no more teams in the southeastern United States until the 2016 expansion team, the Greensboro Swarm.

After the 2006 to 2009 expansions, the league membership was fairly consistent with only a few relocations and suspensions. In 2009, the Houston Rockets entered into the first single-affiliation partnership, called the hybrid model, with the Rio Grande Valley Vipers. This began a wave of NBA and D-League teams entering into single-affiliation agreements of both the hybrid and parent-team owned varieties. With more NBA involvement, the league once again began to expand and spread its footprint.

By 2015, the last multiple-affiliate team, the Fort Wayne Mad Ants, was purchased by the Indiana Pacers leading to the first season where all D-League teams were affiliated with only one NBA team. As there were no longer any unaffiliated D-League teams left, the remaining NBA teams began purchasing expansion franchises or hybrid partnership teams and placing them near the parent team. In 2015, the Toronto Raptors placed their own team, Raptors 905, in the Greater Toronto Area in Mississauga, Ontario.[14][15] In 2016, the D-League expanded by three more NBA parent club-owned teams for the largest D-League expansion since 2007. The Charlotte Hornets created the Greensboro Swarm, the Brooklyn Nets created the Long Island Nets, and the Chicago Bulls created the Windy City Bulls.

NBA G League (2017–present)

In the 2017–18 season, the D-League entered into a multi-year partnership with Gatorade and announced it would be rebranded as the NBA Gatorade League,[2][3] which was officially shortened to "NBA G League" prior to the season.[16][17] It also continued its membership changes with the relocation of the Erie BayHawks to Lakeland, Florida, as the Lakeland Magic, a new Erie BayHawks franchise; and expansions in the Agua Caliente Clippers in Ontario, California; the Memphis Hustle in Southaven, Mississippi; and the Wisconsin Herd in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The Los Angeles D-Fenders would also re-brand to the South Bay Lakers to reflect the league name change.

In December 2017, the NBA and the live streaming website Twitch announced that they would broadcast G League games on Twitch.tv.[18] ESPN U, ESPNews, and ESPN2 also aired some 2017–18 regular season and playoff games. Games have also been aired on the ESPN Plus subscription service.

For the 2019–20 season, the G League will begin to offer Select Contracts to players that are not yet eligible to enter the NBA Draft.[19] Since 2006, players that are not at least 19-years-old by the end of the calendar year have been ineligible, creating what became known as the "one-and-done" rule where players joined a college basketball team for one season and then leave for the NBA.[20] The new Select Contract is to be an alternative for players who do not want to or cannot attend a college, worth up to $125,000 for a season.[21]

Teams

Upcoming teams

Team City Arena Capacity Founded Joining Head coach NBA affiliate
Birmingham Birmingham, Alabama Legacy Arena 17,654 2019[n] 2022 TBA New Orleans Pelicans
College Park Skyhawks College Park, Georgia Gateway Center 3,500 2017[d] 2019 TBA Atlanta Hawks
Erie BayHawks[d] Erie, Pennsylvania Erie Insurance Arena 6,750 2019[n] TBA New Orleans Pelicans
  1. ^ As the Utah Flash.
  2. ^ As the Huntsville Flight.
  3. ^ As the Anaheim Arsenal.
  4. ^ a b c d The original Erie BayHawks, at the time an affiliate of the Orlando Magic, were fully purchased and moved to Lakeland as the Lakeland Magic starting with the 2017 season. However, the Atlanta Hawks began operating their new development franchise in Erie, intending to move it to College Park, Georgia, once a new arena at Georgia International Convention Center is completed. A third franchise will begin using the BayHawks' name with a new franchise owned by the New Orleans Pelicans in 2019.
  5. ^ As the Asheville Altitude.
  6. ^ Played in the Continental Basketball Association and the International Basketball League (1999–2001) before joining the NBA D-League in 2006.
  7. ^ As the Bakersfield Jam.
  8. ^ As the Dakota Wizards; Played in the International Basketball Association and the Continental Basketball Association before joining the NBA D-League in 2006.
  9. ^ As the Los Angeles D-Fenders; did not field a team for the 2010–11 season.
  10. ^ As the Reno Bighorns.
  11. ^ As the Columbus Riverdragons.
  12. ^ Played as the Idaho Stampede in the Continental Basketball Association before joining the NBA D-League in 2006.
  13. ^ As the Colorado 14ers.
  14. ^ a b The New Orleans Pelicans purchased an expansion team that will begin play as the Erie BayHawks beginning with the 2019–20 season before moving to Birmingham, Alabama, for the 2022–23 season

Team ownership and NBA affiliations

Ownership models vary across the NBA G League. Growing willingness among NBA organizations to invest in the G League has led to two main models: direct ownership of G League teams by parent NBA clubs and single-affiliate partnerships in which the G League team remains independently owned while the parent club runs and finances basketball operations.

Parent club direct ownership began in 2006 when the Los Angeles Lakers bought their own NBA D-League franchise, originally known as the Los Angeles D-Fenders and since 2017–18 as the South Bay Lakers, followed by the San Antonio Spurs purchasing the Austin Toros (now the Austin Spurs) in 2007 and the Oklahoma City Thunder purchasing the Tulsa 66ers (now the Oklahoma City Blue) in 2008. This led to more NBA teams to either purchase existing franchises or create expansion teams in order to have their own single-affiliation teams. In 2011, the Cleveland Cavaliers purchased the New Mexico Thunderbirds to become the Canton Charge and the Golden State Warriors purchased the Dakota Wizards, with the Warriors moving the Wizards a year later to become the Santa Cruz Warriors. In 2013, the Philadelphia 76ers purchased the inactive Utah Flash and moved them to Newark, Delaware as the Delaware 87ers (now the Delaware Blue Coats, and playing in that state's largest city of Wilmington). In 2014, the New York Knicks became the seventh team to fully own and operate their own NBA D-League affiliate in the Westchester Knicks.[27] In 2015, the Toronto Raptors created their own expansion franchise, the Raptors 905. In 2017, the Timberwolves purchased the Iowa Energy and renamed the team the Iowa Wolves.[28]

In 2009, the Houston Rockets and Rio Grande Valley Vipers pioneered the single-affiliate partnership, also known as the hybrid model. In November 2010, the New Jersey Nets and Springfield Armor announced they would enter into a single-affiliate partnership that began in 2011–12. In June 2011, the New York Knicks and Erie BayHawks announced they would be singly-affiliated. In May 2012, the Portland Trail Blazers entered into a single-affiliation partnership with the Idaho Stampede. The following month, the Boston Celtics and Maine Red Claws announced a single-affiliation partnership. In June 2013, the Miami Heat announced that they had entered into a single-affiliated partnership with the Sioux Falls Skyforce. In July 2013, the Sacramento Kings and Reno Bighorns (now the Stockton Kings) entered into a single-affiliation. The Stampede ended their affiliation with the Trail Blazers after the 2013–14 season and in June 2014 announced their affiliation with the Utah Jazz. The Armor moved to Grand Rapids, Michigan, after the 2013–14 season and affiliated with the Detroit Pistons. From 2014 to 2017, the Memphis Grizzlies had a single-affiliation with the Iowa Energy. In 2015, the last multiple affiliate team, the Fort Wayne Mad Ants, was purchased by the Indiana Pacers making the 2015–16 season the first with all teams having single-affiliations.

In some cases, the hybrid affiliation led to the parent team buying their affiliate's franchise outright. On March 24, 2015, the Utah Jazz purchased their affiliate, the Idaho Stampede, and after one more season in Boise relocated the team to Salt Lake City. On April 11, 2016, the Phoenix Suns purchased their affiliate, the Bakersfield Jam, and announced the immediate relocation of the team to Prescott Valley, Arizona, as the Northern Arizona Suns beginning with the 2016–17 season.[25] On October 20, 2016, the Sacramento Kings bought the majority ownership of their affiliate of the previous eight seasons, the Reno Bighorns,[29] and would eventually move the team to Stockton, California as the Stockton Kings after the 2017–18 G League season.[30] On December 14, 2016, the Magic purchased their affiliate, the Erie BayHawks, with the intention to relocate the team to Lakeland, Florida, in 2017.[31] In 2017, the Miami Heat purchased the controlling interest in the Sioux Falls Skyforce after being its primary affiliate since 2013.

Parent club ownership: Agua Caliente Clippers (by the Los Angeles Clippers), Austin Spurs (by the San Antonio Spurs), Birmingham (by the New Orleans Pelicans), Canton Charge (by the Cleveland Cavaliers), Capital City Go-Go (by the Washington Wizards), Delaware Blue Coats (by the Philadelphia 76ers), Erie BayHawks (by the Atlanta Hawks), Fort Wayne Mad Ants (by the Indiana Pacers), Greensboro Swarm (by the Charlotte Hornets), Iowa Wolves (by the Minnesota Timberwolves), Lakeland Magic (by the Orlando Magic), Long Island Nets (by the Brooklyn Nets), Memphis Hustle (by the Memphis Grizzlies), Northern Arizona Suns (by the Phoenix Suns), Oklahoma City Blue (by the Oklahoma City Thunder), Raptors 905 (by the Toronto Raptors), Salt Lake City Stars (by the Utah Jazz), Santa Cruz Warriors (by the Golden State Warriors), Sioux Falls Skyforce (with the Miami Heat), South Bay Lakers (by the Los Angeles Lakers), Stockton Kings (by the Sacramento Kings), Westchester Knicks (by the New York Knicks), the Windy City Bulls (by the Chicago Bulls), and the Wisconsin Herd (by the Milwaukee Bucks).

Single affiliation/hybrid model: Grand Rapids Drive (with the Detroit Pistons), Maine Red Claws (with the Boston Celtics), Rio Grande Valley Vipers (with the Houston Rockets), and the Texas Legends (with the Dallas Mavericks).

NBA teams with announced future affiliation: Erie BayHawks (with the New Orleans Pelicans)

NBA teams without an exclusive affiliate: Denver Nuggets and Portland Trail Blazers.

Future expansion teams and locations

Expansion in the league was slow for the first years, but has rapidly increased since the movement towards single-affiliate teams has become the norm.

Confirmed expansion and relocations

On November 10, 2016, the Atlanta Hawks announced that they had bought and established a new D-League team that will play in a new arena in nearby College Park beginning with the 2019–20 season.[32] In the 2017–18 season, the Hawks' G League franchise began play as the Erie BayHawks, following the Magic's purchase of the original franchise, until the arena in College Park is completed.[33] The team name was announced as the College Park Skyhawks.

On October 24, 2018, the Pelicans announced plans to place their G League team in Birmingham, Alabama, to play in the Birmingham–Jefferson Convention Complex Legacy Arena by 2022. As the arena needs to be renovated, the Pelican's affiliate will begin play the 2019–20 season as the Erie BayHawks after the Atlanta Hawks' affiliate moves to College Park.[34][35]

Expansion candidate locations

On October 12, 2015, it was announced that Omaha, Nebraska, was pursuing a D-League franchise. Gary Green, the owner of the Omaha Storm Chasers, said the NBA approved the idea of a franchise while also mentioning the Minnesota Timberwolves and Denver Nuggets as possible affiliates. Green said, "We've had talks with the NBA and the guys in the D-League and they absolutely want to have a team in Omaha... We have a deal with the D-League in place, we just gotta find a franchise now." The potential home for an Omaha team could be CHI Health Center Omaha (known as CenturyLink Center Omaha in 2015), Ralston Arena, or Baxter Arena.[36][37]

On December 7, 2017, NBA commissioner Adam Silver announced that he was looking into having a G League expansion team in Mexico City potentially as early as 2018.[38] It would be the NBA's first official permanent team in Mexico to test the market after playing exhibition and regular season games in the city.[39]

Defunct / relocated teams

Team City Year(s) Former NBA affiliates Notes
Albuquerque / New Mexico Thunderbirds Albuquerque, New Mexico 2005–2011 Cleveland Cavaliers, Dallas Mavericks, Indiana Pacers, Miami Heat, New Orleans Hornets, Orlando Magic, Philadelphia 76ers, Phoenix Suns, Sacramento Kings, Seattle SuperSonics, Utah Jazz Became the Canton Charge
Anaheim Arsenal Anaheim, California 2006–2009 Atlanta Hawks, Los Angeles Clippers, Orlando Magic, Portland Trail Blazers Became the Springfield Armor
Arkansas RimRockers North Little Rock, Arkansas 2004–2007 Atlanta Hawks, Cleveland Cavaliers, Memphis Grizzlies, Miami Heat, Toronto Raptors Suspended by owners
Asheville Altitude Asheville, North Carolina 2001–2005 None Became the Tulsa 66ers
Bakersfield Jam Bakersfield, California 2006–2016 Atlanta Hawks, Golden State Warriors, Los Angeles Clippers, Los Angeles Lakers, Orlando Magic, Phoenix Suns, Sacramento Kings, Toronto Raptors, Utah Jazz Became the Northern Arizona Suns
(North) Charleston Lowgators Charleston, South Carolina 2001–2004 None Became the Florida Flame
Colorado 14ers Broomfield, Colorado 2006–2009 Denver Nuggets, New Jersey Nets, Toronto Raptors Became the Texas Legends
Columbus Riverdragons Columbus, Georgia 2001–2005 None Became the Austin Toros
Dakota Wizards Bismarck, North Dakota 2006–2012 Chicago Bulls, Golden State Warriors, Memphis Grizzlies, Washington Wizards Became the Santa Cruz Warriors
Erie BayHawks Erie, Pennsylvania 2008–2017 Cleveland Cavaliers, New York Knicks, Orlando Magic, Philadelphia 76ers, Toronto Raptors Became the Lakeland Magic
Fayetteville Patriots Fayetteville, North Carolina 2001–2006 Charlotte Bobcats, Detroit Pistons, New York Knicks Folded by league
Florida Flame Fort Myers, Florida 2004–2006 Boston Celtics, Miami Heat, Minnesota Timberwolves, Orlando Magic Folded by owners
Fort Worth Flyers Fort Worth, Texas 2005–2007 Charlotte Bobcats, Dallas Mavericks, Golden State Warriors, Los Angeles Lakers, Philadelphia 76ers, Portland Trail Blazers Suspended by owners
Greenville Groove Greenville, South Carolina 2001–2003 None Folded by league
Huntsville Flight Huntsville, Alabama 2001–2005 None Became the Albuquerque Thunderbirds
Idaho Stampede Boise, Idaho 2006–2016 Denver Nuggets, Portland Trail Blazers, Seattle SuperSonics, Toronto Raptors, Utah Jazz Became the Salt Lake City Stars
Mobile Revelers Mobile, Alabama 2001–2003 None Folded by league
Reno Bighorns Reno, Nevada 2008–2018 Atlanta Hawks, Golden State Warriors, Memphis Grizzlies, New York Knicks, Orlando Magic, Sacramento Kings, Utah Jazz Became the Stockton Kings
Roanoke Dazzle Roanoke, Virginia 2001–2006 New Jersey Nets, Philadelphia 76ers, Washington Wizards Folded by league
Springfield Armor Springfield, Massachusetts 2009–2014 New Jersey/Brooklyn Nets, New York Knicks, Philadelphia 76ers Became the Grand Rapids Drive
Tulsa 66ers Tulsa, Oklahoma 2005–2014 Oklahoma City Thunder, Milwaukee Bucks, New York Knicks Became the Oklahoma City Blue
Utah Flash Orem, Utah 2007–2011 Atlanta Hawks, Boston Celtics, Utah Jazz Became the Delaware 87ers

Team timeline

Current teams in tan
Former teams or former names in blue
Announced future teams in green

Player allocations

NBA G League players generally do not sign contracts with the individual teams, but with the league itself. G League team rosters consist of a total of 12 players, 10 (or fewer) being G League players and two (or more) NBA players. The rosters are made up in a number of ways: the previous years' players, players taken in the G League draft, allocation players (meaning players who are assigned to a team with which they have a local connection, such as a University of Texas player being assigned to the Austin Spurs) and NBA team assignments. Each team also has local tryouts, and one player from the tryouts is assigned to the team.

The minimum age to play in the G League is 18,[40] unlike the NBA which requires players to be 19 years old and one year out of high school in order to sign an NBA contract or be eligible for the draft. The base annual salary is US$35,000 plus housing and insurance benefits. Players who are called up for NBA get bonuses totalling up to US$50,000.[41]

The tallest player ever to be assigned was Hasheem Thabeet at 7'3", the second player selected in the 2009 NBA draft. The tallest player to ever play in the G League was England's Paul Sturgess at 7'8", who played with the Texas Legends during the 2013–14 season.

Draft

The NBA G League Draft occurs each season and is the major source from which teams build their rosters. Team rosters are made up of returning players (players who were on the team during the previous season), players waived by an NBA team who are designated as an affiliate player to their respective G League affiliate, allocated players (players who have local significance), and drafted players. The 8 round draft utilizes a "serpentine" format, meaning the order alternates in each round; Team A who selected first in Round 1 will select last in Round 2, while Team B who selected last in Round 1 will get the first pick in Round 2. Round 3 was added in 2014,

The league holds an annual Player Invitational, where prospects hope to earn eligibility for the upcoming draft.[42]

Affiliate players

Players waived by an NBA team during training camp and up until the start of the regular season can be designated as affiliate players and allocated to the NBA team's G League affiliate. Each team is allowed four affiliate players. These are players that an NBA team is interested in developing in their own system. The affiliate players, however, still remain as free agents that any NBA team can sign.[43]

Assignment

Standard assignment

Each NBA team can assign two first-year or second-year players who are under a standard NBA contract to its affiliated G League team. If more than two NBA players are assigned to a team, the team must reduce the number of G League players to keep the total roster size to 12. An NBA player will continue to be paid his NBA salary and will continue to be included on his NBA team's roster on the inactive list while playing in the G League.[44]

NBA teams can call up players as many times as they choose, and there is no limit to the number of times an NBA player with three years or less experience can be assigned to the G League. Starting in 2011–12, veteran NBA players could be assigned with their consent.[45] The first example of such was with Yi Jianlian, who the Dallas Mavericks assigned to the Texas Legends for two games.

Two-way contract

The 2017 Collective Bargaining Agreement for the NBA, which took effect with the 2017–18 season, included changes allowing each NBA team to sign two players to two-way contracts. These players will spend the majority of their time on a team's G League roster, but can freely move to their respective NBA team for up to 45 days in the regular season, as well as be a part of the team's roster before the start of the season (including NBA training camps) and after the conclusion of the G League's regular season (though they are not allowed to be on a team's playoff roster or play in a playoff game).[46] Only players with four or less years of NBA experience are eligible for two-way contracts.[47] Unlike other G League players, who can be called up by any NBA team, two-way players can only be called up by their contracted NBA team. Players under two-way contracts are not counted against the NBA team's regular roster limit, and can be assigned to a G League affiliate for development while also getting a larger salary whenever they are called up to the parent team. For teams that do not have a one-to-one affiliation with a G League team, a process similar to the "flexible assignment" rule is being used to determine the placement for their own two-way contracts in the G League until every team has their proper affiliation underway. In addition, salaries for two-way players are much higher than those for regular G League players. As of the 2017–18 season, G League players who are not on two-way contracts earn either $19,500 or $26,000 during the league's season.[1] By contrast, two-way players' salaries while in the G League, which are pro-rated according to the number of days the player is with his G League team, are based on an annual salary between $50,000 and $75,000,[48] and while these players are with their NBA team, they will earn a pro-rated portion of the NBA minimum rookie salary (which was $815,615 in the 2017–18 season).[49]

Successful NBA call-ups

Many former NBA draftees, waived players and undrafted players have played in the NBA D-League. Bobby Simmons and Aaron Brooks are the only former D-League players to win an NBA end-of-season award; both won the Most Improved Player Award with Simmons getting it with the Los Angeles Clippers in 2004–05 and Brooks earning it with the Houston Rockets in 2009–10.[50][51]

In the 2008 NBA draft, the Idaho Stampede's Mike Taylor was drafted 55th by the Portland Trail Blazers. He became the first player from the NBA D-League to be drafted by an NBA team. He was subsequently traded and signed a rookie contract with the Los Angeles Clippers.[52] In the 2014 draft, two D-League players were selected for the first time: P. J. Hairston was drafted 26th (which was also the first time a D–League player was drafted in the first round in the NBA) and Thanasis Antetokounmpo was the 51st pick.

Other noteworthy D-League call-ups include Jeremy Lin, Hassan Whiteside, 2011 NBA champion J. J. Barea, 2014 NBA champion Danny Green, 2015, 2017 and 2018 NBA champion Shaun Livingston, and 2017 NBA champion Matt Barnes.[53][54]

Annual events

All-Star Game

The league held its first All-Star game February 17, 2007, at the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada. It was part of the NBA All-Star Weekend in Las Vegas. As with the NBA's showcase game, a fan vote determined the starting lineup for each team. The East won, 114 to 100, with Pops Mensah-Bonsu named the game's MVP.[55]

The second annual All-Star game was held on February 16, 2008, at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center in New Orleans. The Blue team beat the Red team, 117–99, and Jeremy Richardson was named the MVP. In addition to the NBA D-League All-Star Game, the league debuted its first Dream Factory Friday Night events, which modeled after the NBA All-Star Saturday Night events. The events consists of Three-Point Shootout (won by Adam Harrington), Slam Dunk Contest (won by Brent Petway) and game of H-O-R-S-E (won by Lance Allred).[56]

The 2009 D-League All-Star game was held on February 14, 2009, at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona. The Red Team defeated the Blue Team, 113–103, and Blake Ahearn and Courtney Sims were named co-MVPs.[57] Along with the All-Star game, the NBA D-League ran their second annual Dream Factory Friday Night events. H-O-R-S-E was won by Will Conroy of the Albuquerque Thunderbirds. The Three-Point Shootout was won by Blake Ahearn of the Dakota Wizards, and the Slam Dunk Contest was won by James White of the Bakersfield Jam.[58]

The 2010 D-League All-Star game was held on February 13, 2010, at the Dallas Convention Center in Dallas. The Western Conference team defeated the Eastern Conference Team, 98–81. Bakersfield Jam center Brian Butch, who scored 18 points and grabbed 13 rebounds, was named as the MVP of the game.[59] The NBA D-League also ran their third annual Dream Factory Friday Night events. The inaugural Shooting Stars Competition was won by a team of Pat Carroll, Trey Gilder and Carlos Powell. The Three-Point Shootout was won by Andre Ingram of the Utah Flash, and the Slam Dunk Contest was won by Dar Tucker of the Los Angeles D-Fenders.[60]

NBA G League Showcase

The league stages an annual NBA G League Showcase in which all of the league's teams play each other in a "carnival" format. The showcase was first played in 2005 was originally intended solely as a scouting event for NBA general managers and scouts, but has evolved into a fan-friendly four-day event in which each team plays two games apiece. Since the inception of the event in 2005, there have been 15 players called-up or recalled during or immediately following the Showcase. The showcase has been hosted in Columbus, Georgia (2005), Fayetteville, North Carolina (2006), Sioux Falls, South Dakota (2007), Boise, Idaho (2008), Orem, Utah (2009), Boise, Idaho (2010), South Padre Island, Texas (2011), Reno, Nevada in 2012 and 2013, Santa Cruz, California in 2015, and Mississauga, Ontario in 2017 and 2018.

Honors

List of champions

Year Champion
2002 Greenville Groove
2003 Mobile Revelers
2004 Asheville Altitude
2005 Asheville Altitude
2006 Albuquerque Thunderbirds
2007 Dakota Wizards
2008 Idaho Stampede
2009 Colorado 14ers
2010 Rio Grande Valley Vipers
2011 Iowa Energy
2012 Austin Toros
2013 Rio Grande Valley Vipers
2014 Fort Wayne Mad Ants
2015 Santa Cruz Warriors
2016 Sioux Falls Skyforce
2017 Raptors 905
2018 Austin Spurs

Awards

See also

References

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External links

2017 NBA G League draft

The 2017 NBA G League Draft was the 17th draft of the National Basketball Association G League. The draft was held on October 21, 2017, just before the 2017–18 season.

2017–18 NBA G League season

The 2017–18 NBA G League season was the 17th season of the NBA G League (formerly the NBA D-League), the minor league for the National Basketball Association (NBA). It is the first season after the league rebranded to become the NBA G League as part of multi-year partnership with Gatorade.The Austin Spurs won the league title, sweeping Raptors 905 in the NBA G League Finals.

2018 NBA G League draft

The 2018 NBA G League draft was the 18th draft of the National Basketball Association G League. The draft was held on October 20, 2018, just before the 2018–19 season. Former G League All-Star Willie Reed was selected with the first overall pick by the Salt Lake City Stars.

2018–19 NBA G League season

The 2018–19 NBA G League season is the 18th season of the NBA G League, the official minor league basketball organization owned by the National Basketball Association (NBA).

All-NBA G League Team

The All-NBA G League Team is an annual NBA G League (G League) honor bestowed on the best players in the league following every G League season. The voting is conducted by the league's head coaches. The team has been selected in every season of the league's existence, dating back to its inaugural season in 2001–02. The All-NBA Development League Team is composed of three five-man lineups—a first, second, and third team, typically comprising a total of 15 roster spots. The All-NBA Development League Team originally had two teams, but was expanded to three teams in 2007–08.Players receive five points for a first team vote, three points for a second team vote, and one point for a third team vote. The five players with the highest point totals make the first team, with the next five making the second team and so forth. In the case of a tie at the fifth position of any team, the roster is expanded. If the first team consists of six players due to a tie, the second team will still consist of five players with the potential for more expansion in the event of additional ties. Blake Ahearn, Will Conroy, Omar Cook and Jerel McNeal hold the record for the most total selections with three apiece.

Capital City Go-Go

The Capital City Go-Go is an American professional basketball team in the NBA G League and an affiliate of the Washington Wizards of the National Basketball Association. Based in Washington, D.C., the team will play their home games during the 2018–19 season at the St. Elizabeths East Entertainment and Sports Arena. The team became the twenty-third G League team to be owned by an NBA team.

Erie BayHawks (2017–)

The Erie BayHawks are an American professional basketball team of the NBA G League and an affiliate of the Atlanta Hawks of the National Basketball Association. Based in Erie, Pennsylvania, the team plays their home games during the 2017–18 and 2018–19 seasons at the Erie Insurance Arena. The Atlanta Hawks currently plan to relocate their G League franchise to College Park, Georgia, before the 2019–20 season to play at the new Gateway Center at College Park. The team became the sixteenth D-League team to be owned by an NBA team.

Erie BayHawks (2019–)

The Erie BayHawks are an American professional basketball team of the NBA G League and an affiliate of the New Orleans Pelicans of the National Basketball Association that is announced to begin play in 2019. Based in Erie, Pennsylvania, the team will play their home games at the Erie Insurance Arena. The New Orleans Pelicans plan to relocate their G League franchise to Birmingham, Alabama, to play at the renovated Legacy Arena by 2022.

Erie Insurance Arena

Erie Insurance Arena (originally known as Erie Civic Center and later, Louis J. Tullio Arena) is a multi-purpose indoor arena in the downtown area of Erie, Pennsylvania. It is home to the Erie Otters of the Ontario Hockey League and the Erie BayHawks of the NBA G League. It was built in 1983 as part of the Louis J. Tullio Plaza, which also includes the Warner Theatre and UPMC Park – all of which are administered by the Erie County Convention Center Authority. The arena is named for the Erie Insurance Group, which purchased the naming rights in May 2012.

Hertz Arena

Hertz Arena is a 7,186-seat multi-purpose arena located in Estero, Florida. The arena opened in November 1998 and serves as the home of the Florida Everblades of the ECHL.

List of NBA G League awards

The NBA G League, formerly known as the National Basketball Development League (NBDL) and NBA Development League (D-League), presents 11 annual awards to recognize its teams, players, and coaches for their accomplishments. This does not include the G League championship trophy, which is given to the winning team of the G League Finals.

List of NBA G League champions

The NBA G League (previously known as the National Basketball Development League (NBDL) from 2001 to 2005 and the National Basketball Association Development League (NBA D-League) from 2005 to 2017) Finals is the championship game or series for the NBA G League and the conclusion of the league's postseason. Since the league's inception in 2001–02, a variety of formats has been used to determine the champion. From the inaugural postseason in 2002 through 2006, the four teams with the best records advanced to the postseason because there were no division or conference splits to divide the eight teams. The first two seasons, both semi-finals and the Finals series were in a best-of-three format, whereby a team must win two of the three games to advance or win the championship (the best-of-three would resume again in 2008 and is still used today). Then, between 2004 and 2007, the playoffs used a single-elimination tournament among the four teams, with two semi-final games and one winner-takes-all championship match.In 2007, the league had disposed to 49 teams and was divided into Eastern and Western Conferences, comprising six teams apiece. The playoffs pitted each conference's winner against one another, with the Eastern Conference's Dakota Wizards winning the championship 129–121 in overtime against the Colorado 14ers. With the league's continued expansion to 14 and 16 teams over the next two years, respectively, the two-conference format was replaced with a three-division format consisting of Western, Southwestern and Central Divisions. Both the 2008 and 2009 NBADL championship series were between teams representing the Western and Southwestern Divisions, with no Central teams ever making it to the finals. These divisions split, with the Idaho Stampede of the Western Division winning in 2008, while the Colorado 14ers of the Southwestern Division won in 2009. Since 2010, the league has re-formatted to the Eastern and Western Conferences. Due to there being two more teams in the Western Conference (9) than the Eastern Conference (7), and because the top eight teams with the best regular season records qualify for the postseason irrespective of conference, the 2998 NBADL Finals consisted of two Western Conference teams. No teams from the east had advanced beyond the first fourteen rounds, and the NBADL champion that season was the Rio Grande Valley Vipers.

Mark Jones (sportscaster)

Mark Jones (born November 16, 1961) is a Canadian-American sportscaster for ABC and ESPN since 1990. Prior to that, Jones worked for The Sports Network (TSN) in Canada. He primarily covers college football and NBA games on ABC and ESPN.

NBA G League All-Star Game

The NBA G League All-Star Game is an annual exhibition basketball game held by the NBA G League. The G League was founded in 2001 as the National Basketball Development League (NBDL) and later as the NBA Development League (D-League). The league adopted its current name at the start of the 2017–18 season. The league serves as the National Basketball Association's official minor league basketball organization. In 2018, the All-Star Game was replaced by the NBA G League International Challenge, and the league's top players were instead named to its Midseason All-NBA G League Team.

The game was first held during the 2006–07 season as part of the NBA All-Star Weekend. The D-League All-Star Game is played on Saturday in the same host city as the NBA All-Star Game. However, the game is not held in the same arena as all the other All-Star Saturday events. Instead, it is held on the NBA Jam Session's practice court.In addition to the All-Star Game, the G League also holds the G League Dream Factory Friday Night, an event that is modeled after the NBA All-Star Saturday Night. The event includes some popular competition from the All-Star Saturday Night such as the slam dunk contest and the three-point shootout. The Dream Factory Friday Night was first held during the second D-League All-Star Game in 2008.

Paramount Fine Foods Centre

The Paramount Fine Foods Centre, formerly the Hershey Centre, is a multi-purpose sports and entertainment complex located in Mississauga, Ontario, Canada. Its current name was adopted on July 1, 2018 following a new naming rights agreement with Mississauga-based restaurant chain Paramount Fine Foods.

Reno Events Center

The Reno Events Center is a 7,000-seat multi-purpose arena, located in downtown Reno, Nevada, that was constructed in 2005.

It was the home to the Reno Bighorns of the NBA G League from 2008 to 2018 and to the Reno Barons of the Western Indoor Football Association during their short lived 2011 season.

Along with being a basketball and indoor football venue, it hosts boxing matches and concerts by a wide range of artists.

In 2012 and 2013, the Events Center hosted the NBA D-League Showcase, featuring all of the NBA Development League's teams over a four-day period in early January.

It has also hosted tour stops on the PBR's Built Ford Tough Series.

Starting in 2016 (for 3 years), the arena hosted the Big Sky men's and women's basketball tournament.

Starting in 2019, the arena will be the new home of the Reno Express of the new American West Football Conference.

Sears Centre

The Sears Centre is an 11,000-seat multi-purpose arena in Hoffman Estates, Illinois, a northwest suburb, 25 miles from Chicago. The arena has 43 luxury suites on two separate levels. It was estimated to attract over 750,000 visitors annually.The arena is currently home to the Illinois Recreational Cheerleading Association's (IRCA) State Championship and the Windy City Bulls, the Chicago Bulls' affiliate in the NBA G League.The Sears Centre is located near the former site of the Poplar Creek Music Theater, a venue that was also located in Hoffman Estates from 1980 to 1994. Food services are provided by Levy Restaurants.

In 2011, the Village of Hoffman Estates took over ownership of the arena after Ryan Companies US, Inc. walked away from the arena due to the arena's lack of success. However, since the village took over the arena and hired Global Spectrum to manage it, the arena has shown improvements.

St. Elizabeths East Entertainment and Sports Arena

The Entertainment and Sports Arena is an 118,000-square-foot center for the St. Elizabeths East Campus, in Congress Heights, a residential neighborhood in southeast Washington, D.C.. The arena is home to the Washington Mystics of the WNBA and the Capital City Go-Go of the NBA G League. In addition, it houses a practice facility for the Washington Wizards of the NBA.

The arena was officially opened on September 22, 2018.

Wells Fargo Arena (Des Moines, Iowa)

Wells Fargo Arena is a multi-purpose arena in Des Moines, Iowa, United States. Part of the Iowa Events Center, the arena opened on July 12, 2005, at a cost of $117 million. Named for title sponsor Wells Fargo, the arena replaced the aging Veterans Memorial Auditorium as the Des Moines area's primary venue for sporting events and concerts.

Wells Fargo Arena seats 15,181 people for hockey and arena football games, 16,110 for basketball games, and as many as 16,980 for concerts. It also features The Fort Restaurant, which provides views of the Des Moines River and the Iowa State Capitol. The restaurant opened on October 6, 2005, coinciding with the Iowa Stars' inaugural home game.The arena is also connected to the rest of the Iowa Events Center as well as downtown Des Moines through the city's Skywalk system.

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