NABC Player of the Year

The NABC Player of the Year is an award given annually by the National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC) to recognize the top player in men's college basketball. The award has been given since the 1974–75 season to National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I basketball players. The association added awards for Division II and Division III players in 1983, and for National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) and junior college players in 2008. The awards have previously been sponsored by State Farm Insurance.

In Division I, Duke has the most all-time winners with six. Their rival, North Carolina, as well as Kansas are tied for second with four winners. There have been three ties for NABC Player of the Year (2002, 2004, 2006), and only two players have won the award multiple times (Jay Williams and Ralph Sampson).

In Division II, Virginia Union has four winners, the most all-time, and is followed by Kentucky Wesleyan which has three. Only one tie has occurred (2006), while three players have won the award more than once (Stan Gouard, Earl Jones, John Smith).

In Division III, Potsdam State has the most all-time winners with three, while six other schools are tied for second with two winners apiece. There have been two ties (2007, 2010) and four repeat winners (Leroy Witherspoon, Andrew Olson, Aaron Walton-Moss and Joey Flannery).

At the NAIA level, there is a distinction between NAIA Division I and NAIA Division II winners. Since the awards began in 2008, no school or individual player has received the award multiple times. In junior college, every winner has been a sophomore and has gone on to play at an NCAA Division I school after their community college careers have ended.

NABC Player of the Year
Given forthe most outstanding NCAA men's basketball players in all levels of competition
CountryUnited States
Presented byNABC
State Farm Insurance
History
First award1975
Most recentZion Williamson, Duke
WebsiteOfficial website

Key

Co-Players of the Year
Player (X) Denotes the number of times the player has received the Player of the Year award
School (X) Denotes the number of times a player from that school has been given the Player of the Year award

Division I Players of the Year

Patrick Ewing ca. 1995
Patrick Ewing is the only winner from Georgetown.
Antawn Jamison Cleveland Cavaliers vs Atlanta Hawks cropped
Antawn Jamison won in 1997–98.
Adam Morrison
Adam Morrison shared the award as a junior in 2005–06.
Season Player School State Position Class
1974–75 David Thompson NC State North Carolina Shooting guard / Small forward Senior
1975–76 Scott May Indiana Indiana Forward Senior
1976–77 Marques Johnson UCLA California Guard / Forward Senior
1977–78 Phil Ford North Carolina North Carolina Point guard Senior
1978–79 Larry Bird Indiana State Indiana Small forward Senior
1979–80 Michael Brooks La Salle Pennsylvania Forward Senior
1980–81 Danny Ainge Brigham Young Utah Shooting guard Senior
1981–82 Ralph Sampson Virginia Virginia Center Junior
1982–83 Ralph Sampson (2) Virginia (2) Virginia Center Senior
1983–84 Michael Jordan North Carolina (2) North Carolina Shooting guard Junior
1984–85 Patrick Ewing Georgetown Washington, D.C. Center Senior
1985–86 Walter Berry St. John's New York Power forward Senior
1986–87 David Robinson Navy Maryland Center Senior
1987–88 Danny Manning Kansas Kansas Power forward Senior
1988–89 Sean Elliott Arizona Arizona Small forward Senior
1989–90 Lionel Simmons La Salle (2) Pennsylvania Small forward Senior
1990–91 Larry Johnson UNLV Nevada Power forward Senior
1991–92 Christian Laettner Duke North Carolina Forward Senior
1992–93 Calbert Cheaney Indiana (2) Indiana Small forward Senior
1993–94 Glenn Robinson Purdue Indiana Small forward / Power forward Sophomore
1994–95 Shawn Respert Michigan State Michigan Shooting guard Senior
1995–96 Marcus Camby Massachusetts Massachusetts Center Junior
1996–97 Tim Duncan Wake Forest North Carolina Center Senior
1997–98 Antawn Jamison North Carolina (3) North Carolina Small forward Junior
1998–99 Elton Brand Duke (2) North Carolina Center Sophomore
1999–00 Kenyon Martin Cincinnati Ohio Power forward Senior
2000–01 Jason Williams Duke (3) North Carolina Point guard Sophomore
2001–02 Drew Gooden Kansas (2) Kansas Center Junior
2001–02 Jason Williams (2) Duke (4) North Carolina Point guard Junior
2002–03 Nick Collison Kansas (3) Kansas Power forward Senior
2003–04 Jameer Nelson Saint Joseph's Pennsylvania Point guard Senior
2003–04 Emeka Okafor Connecticut Connecticut Center Junior
2004–05 Andrew Bogut Utah Utah Center Sophomore
2005–06 Adam Morrison Gonzaga Washington Small forward Junior
2005–06 J. J. Redick Duke (5) North Carolina Shooting guard Senior
2006–07 Kevin Durant Texas Texas Small forward Freshman
2007–08 Tyler Hansbrough North Carolina (4) North Carolina Power forward Junior
2008–09 Blake Griffin Oklahoma Oklahoma Power forward Sophomore
2009–10 Evan Turner Ohio State Ohio Small forward Junior
2010–11 Jimmer Fredette Brigham Young (2) Utah Point guard Senior
2011–12 Draymond Green Michigan State (2) Michigan Power forward Senior
2012–13 Trey Burke Michigan Michigan Point guard Sophomore
2013–14 Doug McDermott Creighton Nebraska Small forward Senior
2014–15 Frank Kaminsky Wisconsin Wisconsin Power forward / Center Senior
2015–16 Denzel Valentine Michigan State (3) Michigan Shooting guard Senior
2016–17 Frank Mason III Kansas (4) Kansas Point guard Senior
2017–18 Jalen Brunson Villanova Pennsylvania Point guard Junior
2018–19 Zion Williamson Duke (6) North Carolina Small forward / Power forward Freshman

Division II Player of the Year

Charles Oakley
Charles Oakley won in 1984–85 and later became an NBA All-Star while playing for the New York Knicks.
Season Player School State Position Class
1982–83 Earl Jones District of Columbia Washington, D.C. Center Junior
1983–84 Earl Jones (2) District of Columbia (2) Washington, D.C. Center Senior
1984–85 Charles Oakley Virginia Union Virginia Power forward Senior
1985–86 Todd Linder Tampa Florida Small forward Junior
1986–87 Ralph Talley Norfolk State Virginia Point guard Senior
1987–88 Jerry Johnson Florida Southern Florida Point guard Senior
1988–89 Kris Kearney Florida Southern (2) Florida Forward Senior
1989–90 A. J. English Virginia Union (2) Virginia Shooting guard Senior
1990–91 Corey Crowder Kentucky Wesleyan Kentucky Small forward / Shooting guard Senior
1991–92 Eric Manuel Oklahoma City Oklahoma Small forward Senior
1992–93 Alex Wright Central Oklahoma Oklahoma Shooting guard Senior
1993–94 Derrick Johnson Virginia Union (3) Virginia Center / Power forward Senior
1994–95 Stan Gouard Southern Indiana Indiana Guard Junior
1995–96 Stan Gouard (2) Southern Indiana (2) Indiana Guard Senior
1996–97 Kebu Stewart Cal State Bakersfield California Power forward Senior
1997–98 Joe Newton Central Oklahoma (2) Oklahoma Point guard / Shooting guard Senior
1998–99 Antonio García Kentucky Wesleyan (2) Kentucky Forward Senior
1999–00 Ajumu Gaines Charleston West Virginia Point guard Senior
2000–01 Colin Ducharme Longwood Virginia Power forward Senior
2001–02 Ronald Murray Shaw North Carolina Shooting guard / Point guard Senior
2002–03 Marlon Parmer Kentucky Wesleyan (3) Kentucky Point guard Senior
2003–04 Elad Inbar UMass Lowell Massachusetts Forward Senior
2004–05 Mark Worthington Metro State Colorado Forward Senior
2005–06 Darius Hargrove Virginia Union (4) Virginia Shooting guard / Small forward Senior
2005–06 Turner Trofholz South Dakota South Dakota Power forward Senior
2006–07 John Smith Winona State Minnesota Center Junior
2007–08 John Smith (2) Winona State (2) Minnesota Center Senior
2008–09 Josh Bostic Findlay Ohio Small forward Senior
2009–10 Jason Westrol Bentley Massachusetts Point guard Senior
2010–11 Darryl Webb Indiana (PA) Pennsylvania Forward Senior
2011–12 Braydon Hobbs Bellarmine Kentucky Point guard Senior
2012–13 Clayton Vette Winona State (3) Minnesota Power forward Senior
2013–14 Brandon Jefferson Metro State (2) Colorado Point guard Senior
2014–15 Mitch McCarron Metro State (3) Colorado Shooting guard Senior
2015–16 Dan Jansen Augustana South Dakota Power forward Senior
2016–17 Justin Pitts Northwest Missouri State Missouri Point guard Junior
2017–18 Zach Hankins Ferris State Michigan Center Junior
2018–19 Daulton Hommes Point Loma Nazarene California Guard Junior

Division III Player of the Year

JimmyBartolotta
Jimmy Bartolotta was the first recipient to play for MIT. He was the Division III Player of the Year in 2008–09.
Season Player School State Position Class
1982–83 Leroy Witherspoon Potsdam State New York Point guard Junior
1983–84 Leroy Witherspoon (2) Potsdam State (2) New York Point guard Senior
1984–85 Tim Casey Wittenberg Ohio Senior
1985–86 Dick Hempy Otterbein Ohio Guard Junior
1986–87 Brendan Mitchell Potsdam State (3) New York Small forward Senior
1987–88 Scott Tedder Ohio Wesleyan Ohio Small forward / Shooting guard Senior
1988–89 Greg Grant Trenton State New Jersey Point guard Senior
1989–90 Matt Hancock Colby Maine Shooting guard Senior
1990–91 Brad Baldridge Wittenberg (2) Ohio Center Senior
1991–92 Andre Foreman Salisbury State Maryland Power forward Senior
1992–93 Steve Hondred Calvin Michigan
1993–94 Scott Fitch SUNY Geneseo New York Guard Senior
1994–95 D'Artis Jones Ohio Northern Ohio Shooting guard Senior
1995–96 David Benter Hanover Indiana Senior
1996–97 Bryan Crabtree Illinois Wesleyan Illinois Small forward Senior
1997–98 Mike Nogelo Williams Massachusetts Forward Senior
1998–99 Merrill Brunson Wisconsin–Platteville Wisconsin Point guard / Shooting guard Junior
1999–00 Aaron Winkle Calvin (2) Michigan Power forward Senior
2000–01 Horace Jenkins William Paterson New Jersey Point guard Senior
2001–02 Jeff Gibbs Otterbein (2) Ohio Forward Senior
2002–03 Bryan Nelson Wooster Ohio
2003–04 Richard Melzer Wisconsin–River Falls Wisconsin Forward Senior
2004–05 Jason Kalsow Wisconsin–Stevens Point Wisconsin Power forward Junior
2005–06 Brandon Adair Virginia Wesleyan Virginia Small forward Junior
2006–07 Andrew Olson Amherst Massachusetts Point guard Junior
2006–07 Ben Strong Guilford North Carolina Center Junior
2007–08 Andrew Olson (2) Amherst (2) Massachusetts Point guard Senior
2008–09 Jimmy Bartolotta MIT Massachusetts Shooting guard Senior
2009–10 Tyler Sanborn Guilford (2) North Carolina Center Senior
2010–11 Michael Taylor Whitworth Washington Shooting guard Senior
2011–12 Chris Davis Wisconsin–Whitewater Wisconsin Power forward Senior
2012–13 Aaron Toomey Amherst (3) Massachusetts Point guard Junior
2013–14 Aaron Walton-Moss Cabrini Pennsylvania Point guard Junior
2014–15 Aaron Walton-Moss (2) Cabrini (2) Pennsylvania Point guard Senior
2015–16 Joey Flannery Babson Massachusetts Point guard Junior
2016–17 Joey Flannery (2) Babson (2) Massachusetts Point guard Senior
2017–18 Tyheim Monroe Cabrini (3) Pennsylvania Power forward Senior
2018–19 Booker Coplin Augsburg Minnesota Shooting guard Junior

NAIA Players of the Year

For the 2007–08 season, Ryan Fiegi, a senior point guard at Oregon Tech, was named the player of the year. Beginning in 2008–09, the NAIA began awarding players of the year for Divisions I and II.

Division I
Season Player School State Position Class
2008–09 Geoff Payne Westminster Utah Forward Senior
2009–10 Nate Brumfield Oklahoma Baptist Oklahoma Forward Senior
2010–11 Justin Johnson Concordia California Guard Senior
2011–12 Emmanuel Wilson Oklahoma Baptist (2) Oklahoma Guard Senior
2012–13 Vic Moses Georgetown Kentucky Forward Senior
2012–13 Dominique Rambo SAGU Texas Guard Junior
2013–14 Dominique Rambo (2) SAGU (2) Texas Guard Senior
2014–15 Kenny Manigault Pikeville Kentucky Guard/forward Senior
2015–16 Deondre McWhorter Georgetown (2) Kentucky Power forward Senior
2016–17 Delarian Williams Life Georgia Forward Senior
2017–18 Ryan Imhoff Carroll Montana Shooting guard Senior
2018–19 Jeff Garrett LSU–Shreveport Louisiana Power forward Senior
Division II
Season Player School State Position Class
2008–09 William Walker Bethel Indiana Forward Senior
2009–10 Steve Briggs Oklahoma Wesleyan Oklahoma Guard Senior
2010–11 Sadiel Rojas Oklahoma Wesleyan (2) Oklahoma Forward Senior
2011–12 Jonathan Dunn Northwood Florida Guard Senior
2012–13 Ra'Shad James Northwood (2) Florida Guard Senior
2013–14 Joe Mitchell Friends Kansas Guard Senior
2014–15 Dominez Burnett Davenport Michigan Forward Junior
2015–16 Dominez Burnett (2) Davenport (2) Michigan Forward Senior
2016–17 Warren Hall Warner Florida Point guard Senior
2017–18 Kyle Steigenga Cornerstone Michigan Forward Senior
2018–19 Cameron Hunt Southwestern Kansas Point guard Senior

Junior College Player of the Year

Since community college players only attend for two years, these players are only either freshmen or sophomores. Afterwards, they move on to a four year university to finish their last two seasons of NCAA eligibility. The "University" column reflects which team these players would play for following their JuCo careers.

Season Player Junior college State Position Class University
2007–08 Jeremie Simmons Mott Michigan Guard Sophomore Ohio State
2008–09 Nafis Ricks Johnson County Kansas Guard Sophomore Missouri State
2009–10 Jae Crowder Howard Texas Forward Sophomore Marquette
2010–11 Kiel Turpin Lincoln Illinois Center Sophomore Florida State
2011–12 Cleanthony Early SUNY Sullivan New York Power forward Sophomore Wichita State
2012–13 Chris Jones Northwest Florida State Florida Guard Sophomore Louisville
2013–14 Kadeem Allen Hutchinson Kansas Guard Sophomore Arizona
2014–15 Brandon Brown Phoenix Arizona Guard Sophomore Loyola Marymount
2015–16 Kavell Bigby-Williams Gillette Wyoming Forward Sophomore Oregon
2016–17 Shakur Juiston Hutchinson Kansas Forward Sophomore UNLV
2017–18 Charles Jones Jr. College of Southern Idaho Idaho Guard Sophomore Utah

See also

External links

Big East Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year

The Big East Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year award is given to the men's basketball player in the Big East Conference voted as the top performer by the conference coaches. It was first awarded at the end of the league's inaugural season of 1979–80.

The head coaches of the league's teams (currently 10) submit their votes following the end of the regular season and before the conference's tournament in early March. The coaches cannot vote for their own players.The award was introduced following the conference's first season in 1980, in which it was presented to John Duren of Georgetown. Patrick Ewing (Georgetown), Richard Hamilton (Connecticut), Troy Bell (Boston College), Troy Murphy (Notre Dame) and Kris Dunn (Providence) each won the award twice, and Chris Mullin (St. John's) won three consecutive times from 1983 through 1985. Three award winners have been inducted as players to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. Ewing, who shared the award in 1984 and 1985 with Mullin, was inducted in 2008 after playing 17 years in the National Basketball Association between 1985 and 2002. Mullin followed in 2011 after a 16-year NBA career (1985–2001). Most recently, Georgetown's 1992 Player of the Year Alonzo Mourning entered the Hall in 2014 following a 16-year NBA career (1992–2008). There have been seven ties; the most recent instance was that between Dunn and Ryan Arcidiacono of Villanova in 2015.Seven players have been awarded a major national player of the year award in the same year that they received a Big East Player of the Year award. In 1985, Ewing and Mullin shared the conference award, while Ewing was named Naismith College Player of the Year and Mullin was given the John R. Wooden Award. The following year, Walter Berry of St. John's received the Wooden Award and the Big East Player of the Year award. In 1996, Ray Allen of Connecticut received the conference award and was also the final recipient of the UPI Player of the Year Award. In 2004, Connecticut's Emeka Okafor won the conference award while sharing NABC Player of the Year honors with Jameer Nelson of Saint Joseph's. Creighton's Doug McDermott received all major national awards along with the conference award in 2014. Finally, Villanova's Jalen Brunson was the national player of the year as well in 2018. Georgetown has had the most winners, with eight. The only current Big East members without a winner are Butler and Xavier, both of which joined the conference at its relaunch following its 2013 split into two leagues, and DePaul, members since 2005.

Big Ten Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year

The Big Ten Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year is a basketball award given to the Big Ten Conference's most outstanding player. The award was first given following the 1984–85 season. Only two players have won the award multiple times: Jim Jackson of Ohio State (1991, 1992) and Mateen Cleaves of Michigan State (1998, 1999). Eight players who won the Big Ten Player of the Year award were also named the national player of the year by one or more major voting bodies: Jim Jackson (1992), Calbert Cheaney of Indiana (1993), Glenn Robinson of Purdue (1994), Evan Turner of Ohio State (2010), Trey Burke of Michigan 2013, Draymond Green of Michigan State (2012), Frank Kaminsky of Wisconsin (2015), and Denzel Valentine of Michigan State (2016).

Michigan State has the record for the most winners with nine. Of current Big Ten Conference members, six schools have never had a winner: Iowa, Maryland, Nebraska, Northwestern, Penn State, and Rutgers. Of these, only Iowa and Northwestern were in the conference since the inception of this award—Penn State joined the Big Ten in 1991, Nebraska joined in 2011, followed by Maryland and Rutgers in 2014.

Clarence Gaines Award

The Clarence "Big House" Gaines Award is an award given annually by Collegeinsider.com to the most outstanding men's college basketball head coach in NCAA Division II. The award was established in 2011 and is named for the late Clarence Gaines, who coached for 47 years at Winston-Salem State University.

Creighton Bluejays men's basketball

The Creighton Bluejays men's basketball team represents Creighton University of the NCAA Division I college basketball. They currently compete in the Big East Conference having joined the conference following the Big East conference realignment in 2013. The Bluejays play their home games at CHI Health Center Omaha in Omaha, Nebraska. Creighton finished sixth nationally in home attendance, averaging 17,048 fans per home game in 2014–15.Before joining the Big East, Creighton was a member of the Missouri Valley Conference from 1976 through 2013. The Jays were also members of the MVC from 1928 to 1948 and participated as an independent from 1948 to 1977 before rejoining the MVC. The Bluejays have won a record 15 MVC regular season conference titles and a record 12 MVC Tournament titles.The team has 20 appearances in the NCAA Tournament. The Jays last played in the NCAA Tournament in 2018. The Bluejays won at least one NCAA tournament game for three consecutive seasons, including a 58–57 win over Alabama, a 67–63 win over Cincinnati and a 76–66 win over Louisiana-Lafayette.

Denzel Valentine

Denzel Robert Valentine (born November 16, 1993) is an American professional basketball player for the Chicago Bulls of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He played college basketball for Michigan State. As a senior, Valentine became the first player in Michigan State history to be recognized as the National Player of the Year by The Associated Press. He also earned other player of the year awards from the NABC, USA Today, Sports Illustrated, NBC Sports, and Basketball Times in addition to being named a unanimous First-Team All-American.

East Coast Conference (Division I) Men's Basketball Player of the Year

The East Coast Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year was a basketball award given to the East Coast Conference's most outstanding player. The award was first given following the 1974–75 season and was discontinued after the league folded following the 1993–94 season. In 1994 the East Coast Conference was absorbed into the Mid-Continent Conference, now known as The Summit League.

There were two ties in the award's history — 1982 and 1987. In its first year, the ECC named Players of the Year for each division — with Wilbur Thomas of American named the East Player of the Year and Henry Horne of Lafayette winning the West award.

One player, Michael Brooks of La Salle, won the award three times (1978, 1979, 1980) and was also named the National Player of the Year (1980) by being presented the NABC Player of the Year. Two others, Michael Anderson of Drexel and Kurk Lee of Towson State, won the award twice.

Frank Mason III

Frank Leo Mason III (born April 3, 1994) is an American professional basketball player for the Sacramento Kings of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He played college basketball for the University of Kansas, where he was the starting point guard for the Jayhawks. For the 2016–17 season, he was named National Player of the Year by all of the major national player awards, making him consensus national player of the year. The awards are the John R. Wooden Award, CBS Sports National Player of the Year, the USA Today, the Sporting News Player of the Year, Associated Press Player of the Year, Naismith College Player of the Year, Oscar Robertson Trophy, and NABC Player of the Year. He was also a consensus All-American selection for his senior season at Kansas.

Jay Williams (basketball)

Jason David Williams (born September 10, 1981) is an American former basketball player and current television analyst. He played college basketball for the Duke University Blue Devils and professionally for the Chicago Bulls in the NBA.

Then known as Jason Williams, he won the 2001 NCAA Championship with Duke, and was named NABC Player of the Year in 2001 and 2002. He was drafted second overall in the 2002 NBA Draft by the Bulls. He asked to be called Jay on joining the Bulls, to avoid confusion with two other players in the NBA at the time. His playing career was effectively ended by a motorcycle accident in 2003. He last signed with the Austin Toros of the NBA Development League, but was waived on December 30, 2006 due to lingering physical effects from his accident.Since retiring, he has worked as an analyst for ESPN, covering

college basketball.

List of Senior CLASS Award men's basketball winners

The Senior CLASS Award is presented each year to the outstanding senior NCAA Division I Student-Athlete of the Year in men's basketball. The acronym "CLASS" stands for Celebrating Loyalty and Achievement for Staying in School. The award was established in 2001. The ten finalists for the Lowe's Senior CLASS Award are described as Senior All-Americans.

List of U.S. men's college basketball national player of the year awards

This article lists U.S. men's college basketball national player of the year awards. Several different organizations sponsor an award for the nation's top player.

Michael Brooks (basketball)

Michael Anthony Brooks (August 17, 1958 – August 22, 2016) was an American professional basketball player. At 6 feet 7 inches (2.01 m), he played as a forward.

Mitch McCarron

Mitchell James Robert McCarron (born 30 June 1992) is an Australian professional basketball player for the Southland Sharks of the National Basketball League (NBL).

In 2010, McCarron attended the Australian Institute of Sport. He played college basketball in the United States for Metropolitan State University of Denver (Metro State) between 2012 and 2015. During his three seasons with the Roadrunners, he led the team to back to back NCAA Division II Final Four appearances, including a runner-up finish in 2013. He averaged 16.3 points and 6.7 rebounds for his career and in 2015 was named NABC Player of the Year.Following college, McCarron played one season for Palencia Baloncesto of Spain's Second Division. He signed a two-year deal with the Cairns Taipans in his native Australia on 13 May 2016. After a stint with Petrol Olimpija following the 2017–18 NBL season, McCarron signed a three-year deal with Melbourne United on 8 June 2018. On 28 February 2019, he signed with the Southland Sharks for the 2019 New Zealand NBL season.

NABC Coach of the Year

The NABC Coach of the Year Award has been presented by the National Association of Basketball Coaches since 1959. A longtime sponsor of the award was Kodak; it is currently sponsored by the UPS Store.

NABC Defensive Player of the Year

The NABC Defensive Player of the Year is an award given annually by the National Association of Basketball Coaches to recognize the top defensive player in United States college basketball. The award has been given since 1987 and was previously known as the Henry Iba Corinthian Award, named after Hall of Fame coach Henry Iba, who coached at Oklahoma State University from 1934–1970.

Duke University has dominated the award with six recipients who have won a total of nine awards. The only other schools with more than one recipient are Connecticut, with two recipients who combined for four awards, and Ohio State, Kentucky, and Virginia with two recipients who each won the award once. Three players have been named the NABC Defensive Player of the Year on three occasions—Stacey Augmon of UNLV (1989–91), Tim Duncan of Wake Forest (1995–97), and Shane Battier of Duke (1999–2001). Greg Oden (2007) and Anthony Davis (2012) are the only freshmen to have won the award.

Two winners of this award were born outside the main territory of the United States. Duncan was born in the United States Virgin Islands, an insular area of the U.S.; by U.S. law, all natives of the USVI are U.S. citizens by birth. Hasheem Thabeet, the 2008 and 2009 winner, is a native of Tanzania.

NCAA Basketball Tournament Most Outstanding Player

At the conclusion of the NCAA men's and women's Division I basketball championships (the "Final Four" tournaments), the Associated Press selects a Most Outstanding Player. The MOP need not be, but almost always is, a member of the Championship team, especially since the third-place game was eliminated after 1981. The last man to win the award despite not being on the Championship team was Hakeem Olajuwon (Houston) in 1983. Dawn Staley (Virginia) was the only woman to do so, when she won the award in 1991.

National Association of Basketball Coaches

The National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC), headquartered in Kansas City, Missouri, is an American organization of men's college basketball coaches. It was founded in 1927 by Phog Allen, head men's basketball coach at the University of Kansas.Formation of the NABC began when Joint Basketball Rules Committee, then the central governing authority of the game, announced without notice that it had adopted a change in the rules which virtually eliminated dribbling. Allen, a student of basketball founder James Naismith, organized a nationwide protest which ultimately resulted in the dribble remaining part of the game.In 1939, the NABC held the first national basketball tournament in Evanston, Illinois at the Northwestern Fieldhouse. Oregon defeated Ohio State for the first tournament championship. The next year, the NABC asked the NCAA to take over the administration of the tournament. In exchange, the NCAA provided complimentary tickets for NABC members to the Finals and placed an NABC member on its Tournament Committee.NABC initiatives include establishing the original Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield, Massachusetts, the format of today's NCAA Basketball Tournament, and the College Basketball Experience and National Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame at the Sprint Center arena in downtown Kansas City, Missouri. This facility was completed on October 10, 2007.

Nick Collison

Nicholas John Collison (born October 26, 1980) is an American former professional basketball player who played his entire 15-year career in the National Basketball Association (NBA) with the Seattle SuperSonics/Oklahoma City Thunder franchise. He was drafted by the SuperSonics in the first round of the 2003 NBA draft and retired as a member of the Thunder in 2018. As a college player, Collison went to two Final Fours with the Kansas Jayhawks.

Sean Elliott

Sean Michael Elliott (born February 2, 1968) is an American former professional basketball player who starred at small forward in both the college and professional ranks. He attended the University of Arizona, where he had a standout career as a two-time All-American, winner of the 1989 John R. Wooden Award, the 1989 Adolph Rupp Trophy, the 1989 NABC Player of the Year, 1989 AP Player of the Year, and two time Pac-12 Player of the Year (in 1988–1989).

He was the third pick of the 1989 NBA draft, was named to the 1990 NBA All-Rookie Second Team, was a two-time NBA All-Star, and earned an NBA championship in 1999.

His #32 is retired by both the University of Arizona and the San Antonio Spurs.

Shawn Respert

Shawn Christopher Respert (born February 6, 1972) is an American retired professional basketball player who used to be an assistant coach with the Chicago Bulls of the National Basketball Association (NBA). A 6'3" shooting guard born in Detroit, Michigan, he attended Bishop Borgess High School, and he came to prominence while playing college basketball at Michigan State University where his jersey is now retired. He played professionally in the NBA for four seasons from 1995 to 1999.

Men's college basketball awards (United States)
National players of the year
Individual awards
Conference players of the year
Head coach awards
Conference coaches of the year
Division awards
Other awards
NABC Player of the Year

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