Myril Hoag

Myril Oliver Hoag (March 9, 1908 – July 28, 1971) was an American professional baseball player. An outfielder, Hoag played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the New York Yankees, St. Louis Browns, Chicago White Sox, and Cleveland Indians between 1931 and 1945 and was on the winning team in three World Series. He appeared in the 1939 MLB All-Star Game.

Myril Hoag
MyrilHoagGoudeycard
Outfielder
Born: March 9, 1908
Davis, California
Died: July 28, 1971 (aged 63)
High Springs, Florida
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 15, 1931, for the New York Yankees
Last MLB appearance
September 16, 1945, for the Cleveland Indians
MLB statistics
Batting average.271
Home runs28
Runs batted in401
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Career

Hoag was born in Davis, California. He played from April 15, 1931, until September 16, 1945. He batted and threw right-handed. He had a lifetime batting average of .271 with 28 home runs and 401 RBIs.

After two seasons with the Sacramento Senators, Hoag signed with the New York Yankees after the 1930 season. He spent seven seasons with the Yankees over eight years (playing in 1933 with the Newark Bears). Hoag missed some of the 1936 season due to having a blood clot on the brain, the result of an outfield collision with teammate Joe DiMaggio.[1]

Hoag homered for the Yankees' first run as they won the final game of the 1937 World Series. He had a .320 batting average for his three World Series.

In 1939, he made the American League All-Star team with the St. Louis Browns after the Yankees traded him there for Oral Hildebrand and Buster Mills. That year, he batted .295 with 75 RBIs and 202 total bases. He was fifth in the league in stolen bases in 1942 with the Chicago White Sox with 17, nearly double his second-best season (nine in 1939).

Hoag ended his career with 854 hits in 3,147 at bats. On June 6, 1934, he collected six hits in one game in a 15-3 rout against the Red Sox, and was the last New York Yankee to accomplish this feat until Johnny Damon did so against the Kansas City Royals on June 7, 2008.[2]

Personal life

Hoag died in High Springs, Florida from an emphysema attack at the age of 63.[3] His great nephews, Max and Brock Stassi, play in MLB.[4][5]

See also

References

  1. ^ Preston, JG. "Major league players who converted to pitching after becoming minor league managers". prestonjg.wordpress.com. Retrieved 30 January 2017.
  2. ^ DiComo, Anthony (June 7, 2008). "Damon, Yankees scorch Royals". MLB.com. Retrieved August 29, 2014.
  3. ^ "Baseball in Wartime - Myril Hoag". www.baseballinwartime.com. Retrieved 2017-07-27.
  4. ^ Lisa Winston (2009-05-13). "Bloodlines run deep during Draft | MLB.com: News". Mlb.mlb.com. Retrieved 2013-08-23.
  5. ^ "News Archives – sacbee.com". Nl.newsbank.com. 2007-04-25. Retrieved 2013-08-23.

External links

1931 New York Yankees season

The 1931 New York Yankees season was the team's 29th season in New York and its 31st season overall. The team finished with a record of 94–59, finishing 13.5 games behind the Philadelphia Athletics. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. This team is notable for holding the modern day Major League record for team runs scored in a season with 1,067 (6.88 per game average).

1932 New York Yankees season

The 1932 New York Yankees season was the team's 30th season in New York, and its 32nd season overall. The team finished with a record of 107–47, winning their seventh pennant, finishing 13 games ahead of the Philadelphia Athletics. New York was managed by future Hall of Famer Joe McCarthy. A record nine future Hall of Famers played on the team (Earle Combs, Bill Dickey, Lou Gehrig, Lefty Gomez, Tony Lazzeri, Herb Pennock, Red Ruffing, Babe Ruth, Joe Sewell).

The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they swept the Chicago Cubs. They are the only major-league team ever to go an entire season without being shut out.

1934 Major League Baseball season

The 1934 Major League Baseball season.

1934 New York Yankees season

The 1934 New York Yankees season was the team's 32nd season in New York and its 34th season overall. The team finished with a record of 94–60, finishing 7 games behind the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. It would also be the final year Babe Ruth would play as a Yankee.

1935 New York Yankees season

The 1935 New York Yankees season was the team's 33rd season in New York and its 35th season overall. The team finished with a record of 89–60, finishing 3 games behind the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium.

1936 New York Yankees season

The 1936 New York Yankees season was the team's 34th season in New York and its 36th season overall. The team finished with a record of 102–51, winning their 8th pennant, finishing 19.5 games ahead of the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they beat the New York Giants in 6 games.

1937 New York Yankees season

The 1937 New York Yankees season was their 35th season. The team finished with a record of 102–52, winning their 9th pennant, finishing 13 games ahead of the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they beat the New York Giants in 5 games. This gave the Yankees a 3-to-2 edge in overall series play against the Giants.

1937 saw significant changes in the layout of Yankee Stadium, as concrete bleachers were built to replace the aging wooden structure, reducing the cavernous "death valley" of left center and center considerably, although the area remained a daunting target for right-handed power hitters such as Joe DiMaggio.

1937 World Series

The 1937 World Series featured the defending champion New York Yankees and the New York Giants in a rematch of the 1936 Series. The Yankees won in five games, for their second championship in a row and their sixth in fifteen years (1923, 1927–28, 1932, 1936).

This was the Yankees' third Series win over the Giants (1923, 1936), finally giving them an overall edge in Series wins over the Giants with three Fall Classic wins to the Giants' two (after they lost the 1921 and 1922 Series to the Giants). Currently (as of 2018), the St. Louis Cardinals are the only "Classic Eight" National League (1900–1961) team to hold a Series edge over the Bronx Bombers, with three wins to the Yankees' two. The 1937 victory by the Yankees also broke a three-way tie among themselves, the Philadelphia Athletics and the Boston Red Sox for the most World Series wins all-time (five each). By the time the Athletics and Red Sox won their sixth World Series (in 1972 and 2004, respectively), the Yankees had far outpaced them in world championships with 20 in 1972 and 26 in 2004.

The 1937 Series was the first in which a team (in this case, the Yankees) did not commit a single error, handling 179 total chances (132 putouts, 47 assists) perfectly. Game 4 ended with the final World Series innings ever pitched by Hall of Famer Carl Hubbell who, during the ninth inning, gave up Hall of Famer Lou Gehrig's final Series home run.

1938 New York Yankees season

The 1938 New York Yankees season was their 36th season. The team finished with a record of 99–53, winning their 10th pennant, finishing 9.5 games ahead of the Boston Red Sox. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. In the 1938 World Series, they beat the Chicago Cubs in 4 games. This marked the first time any team had won three consecutive World Series.

1939 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1939 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the seventh playing of the mid-summer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 11, 1939, at Yankee Stadium in The Bronx, New York City, the home of the New York Yankees of the American League. The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 3–1.

1939 St. Louis Browns season

The 1939 St. Louis Browns season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Browns finishing 8th in the American League with a record of 43 wins and 111 losses.

1941 Chicago White Sox season

The 1941 Chicago White Sox season was the White Sox's 41st season in the major leagues, and their 42nd season overall. They finished with a record 77–77, good enough for 3rd place in the American League, 24 games behind the first place New York Yankees.

1942 Chicago White Sox season

The 1942 Chicago White Sox season was the White Sox's 43rd season. They finished with a record 66–82, good enough for 6th place in the American League, 34 games behind the 1st place New York Yankees.

1944 Chicago White Sox season

The 1944 Chicago White Sox season was the White Sox's 44th season in the major leagues, and their 45th season overall. They finished with a record 71–83, good enough for 7th place in the American League, 18 games behind the first place St. Louis Browns.

Hoag

Hoag is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Arthur Hoag (1921–1999), American astronomer

Bob Hoag, American record producer and songwriter

Charles Hoag (1808–1888), American scholar and teacher; first school master of Minneapolis, Minnesota

Charlie Hoag (1931–2012), American professional basketball player

Dutch Hoag (1926–2016), American race car driver

Elizabeth Gorham Hoag (1857–1875), American sorority sister; founding member of Sigma Kappa

Harold Hoag (b. 1966), American professional wrestler

Jan Hoag (b. 1948), American film and television actress

Judith Hoag (b. 1968), American actress

Myril Hoag (1908–1971), American professional baseball player

Ryan Hoag (b. 1979), American professional football player

Tami Hoag (b. 1959), American romance novelist

Truman H. Hoag (1816–1870), American politician

List of Major League Baseball players (H)

The following is a list of Major League Baseball players, retired or active. As of the end of the 2011 season, there have been 1,295 players with a last name that begins with H who have been on a major league roster at some point.

Palatka Azaleas

The Palatka Azaleas were a minor league baseball team that existed from 1936 to 1939 and from 1946 to 1953. They played in the Florida State League. In 1936, they were affiliated with the Detroit Tigers, in 1937 they were affiliated with the New York Yankees, and in 1949 they were affiliated with the Tampa Smokers. In 1956, a Palatka team began play again and evolved into the Palatka Redlegs.

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