Murray Olderman

Murray Olderman (born March 27, 1922) is an American sports cartoonist and writer.[1] His artwork often accompanied the sports stories he authored. His art also has been used by the Pro Football Hall of Fame and hung above the Hall of Fame busts. Recently, the Hall of Fame made all of the artwork digital so it must be accessed by visitors to the hall through electronic kiosks.[2]

Murray Olderman
BornMarch 27, 1922 (age 96)
Spring Valley, New York
NationalityAmerican
Area(s)Cartoonist, author
AwardsNational Cartoonist Society Sports Cartoon Award, 1974 and 1978
http://www.murrayolderman.com

Early life and education

Olderman aspired to be a sportswriter at an early age. When he was in his teens, he wrote sports columns for a county weekly.[1] He practiced drawing cartoons through trial and error. One of his drawings was first published in The Columbia Missourian during his junior year at the University of Missouri.[1] Olderman graduated from University of Missouri with a B.J. degree, Stanford University with a B.S. in humanities, and Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism with a master's degree in journalism.[1]

Career

Olderman was hired by the McClatchy Newspapers of Sacramento as a sports cartoonist.[1]

Olderman's work appeared in 750 daily newspapers for the greater part of 35 years. His columns and cartoons were distributed by the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), a Scripps-Howard syndicate.[1] Olderman's employment with the NEA began in 1952; he became its sports editor in 1964; executive editor in 1968; and a contributing editor in 1971. Although he "retired" in 1987, he was active until the news service was overtaken by a larger corporation.

Olderman is the founder of the Jim Thorpe Trophy, for the National Football League’s Most Valuable Player, and distributed by the Newspaper Enterprise Association.[1][3] He also founded the NEA All-Pro team in 1954, which ran through 1992.[1] It was considered the "Player's All-Pro team", since Olderman would poll NFL players to compile the team.

Awards

Olderman received the National Cartoonist Society Sports Cartoon Award for 1974 and 1978. He received the Pro Football Writers Association Dick McCann Memorial Award in 1979, which is considered to be the writer's wing of the Pro Football Hall of Fame.[4] Olderman was inducted into the National Sportscasters and Sportswriters Association Hall of Fame in 1993. In 1997 he was inducted to the International Jewish Sports Hall of Fame. He was inducted into the Northwestern University Medill Hall of Achievement for 2014.[5]

Olderman is a longtime resident of Rancho Mirage, California.

Books

  • Prentice-Hall series:
    • The Pro Quarterbacks (1967)
    • The Running Backs (1969)
    • The Defenders (1980)
  • Starr: My Life in Football, with Bart Starr (William Morrow & Co, 1987)
  • Mingling With Lions: The Greats of Sports Up Close (Seven Locks Press, 2004) — Olderman's career as a sportswriter and the people he has met along the way. Filled with sketches.
  • Angels in the Forest (iUniverse, Inc., 2006)— memoir written with Earl Greif about the latter's survival from a ghetto massacre during World War II and how he escaped the Holocaust
  • Just Win, Baby—the Al Davis Story (Triumph Books, 2012) — a biography of the late owner of the Oakland Raiders
  • A Year Apart... Letters from War-Torn Europe (Saint Johann Press, 2013) — based on letters written from Europe at the end of World War II by the author to this wife, with added commentary.

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h Horgan, Richard. "SO WHAT DO YOU DO, MURRAY OLDERMAN, ICONIC SPORTS JOURNALIST AND CARTOONIST?," Media Bistro (May 21, 2014).
  2. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2015-04-07. Retrieved 2015-04-03.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  3. ^ Olderman bio, Jewish Sports.net. Accessed Aug. 25, 2014.
  4. ^ Dick McCann Memorial Award
  5. ^ http://www.northwestern.edu/newscenter/stories/2014/04/medill-inducts-six-alumni-into-hall-of-achievement.html

External links

1958 NFL season

The 1958 NFL season was the 39th regular season of the National Football League.

The Baltimore Colts defeated the New York Giants, 23–17, in the first sudden-death overtime in an NFL Championship Game. The game became known to American football fans as "The Greatest Game Ever Played."

1964 Northwestern Wildcats football team

The 1964 Northwestern Wildcats team represented Northwestern University during the 1964 Big Ten Conference football season. In their first year under head coach Alex Agase, the Wildcats compiled a 3–6 record (2–5 against Big Ten Conference opponents) and finished in a tie for seventh place in the Big Ten Conference.The team's offensive leaders were quarterback Tom Myers with 901 passing yards, Steve Murphy with 377 rushing yards, and Cas Banaszek with 317 receiving yards. Center Joe Cerne was selected as a first-team All-Big Ten player, and as a second-team All-American by the Newspaper Enterprise Association.

1975 College Football All-America Team

The 1975 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1975. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) recognizes four selectors as "official" for the 1975 season. They are: (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA); (2) the Associated Press (AP) selected based on the votes of sports writers at AP newspapers; (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA) selected by the nation's football writers; and (4) the United Press International (UPI) selected based on the votes of sports writers at UPI newspapers. Other selectors included Football News (FN), the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), The Sporting News (TSN), Time magazine, and the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC).

Two players were unanimously selected by all four official selectors and all five unofficial selectors. They were defensive linemen Steve Niehaus of Notre Dame and Lee Roy Selmon of Oklahoma.

The 1975 Oklahoma Sooners football team had eight players who received first-team honors. The Oklahoma honorees were Lee Roy Selmon, receiver Tinker Owens, offensive tackle Mike Vaughan, offensive guard Terry Webb, defensive end Jimbo Elrod, defensive tackle James White, middle guard Dewey Selmon, and return specialist Joe Washington. Ohio State followed with five first-team honorees: offensive guard Ted Smith, quarterback Cornelius Greene, running back and Heisman Trophy winner Archie Griffin, defensive back Tim Fox, and punter Tom Skladany.

1982 College Football All-America Team

The 1982 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1982. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) recognizes four selectors as "official" for the 1982 season. They are: (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA) based on the input of more than 2,000 voting members; (2) the Associated Press (AP) selected based on the votes of sports writers at AP newspapers; (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA) selected by the nation's football writers; and (4) the United Press International (UPI). Other selectors included Football News (FN), the Gannett News Service (GNS), the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), The Sporting News (TSN), and the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC).

Thirteen players were unanimously selected as first-team All-Americans by all four official selectors. They were:

Jim Arnold, punter for Vanderbilt

Anthony Carter, wide receiver for Michigan, consensus first-team All-American in both 1981 and 1982 and the 1982 winner of the Chicago Tribune Silver Football as the Most Valuable Player in the Big Ten Conference

Eric Dickerson, running back for SMU who rushed for 1,617 yards in 1982

John Elway, quarterback for Stanford, the 1982 recipient of the Sammy Baugh Trophy

Gordon Hudson, tight end for BYU

Terry Kinard, defensive back for Clemson, a consensus All-American in both 1981 and 1982 and the CBS National Defensive Player of the Year in 1982

Steve Korte, offensive lineman for Arkansas

Don Mosebar, offensive lineman for USC

Chuck Nelson, placekicker for Washington

Dave Rimington, center for Nebraska, two-time winner of the Outland Trophy and the namesake of the Rimington Trophy, which is awarded annually to the nation's top collegiate center

Herschel Walker, running back for Georgia, a three-time consensus first-team All-American who finished second in the Heisman Trophy voting in 1981 and won the award in 1982

Billy Ray Smith Jr., defensive end for Arkansas and who was a consensus first-team All-American in both 1981 and 1982

Darryl Talley, linebacker for West Virginia

1984 College Football All-America Team

The 1984 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1984. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) recognizes five selectors as "official" for the 1984 season. They are: (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA); (2) the Associated Press (AP) selected based on the votes of sports writers at AP newspapers; (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA); (4) the United Press International (UPI) selected based on the votes of sports writers at UPI newspapers; and (5) the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC). Other selectors included Football News (FN), Gannett News Service (GNS), the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), and The Sporting News (TSN).

All-Pro

All-Pro is an honor bestowed upon professional American football players that designates the best player at each position during a given season. All-Pro players are typically selected by press organizations, who select an "All-Pro team," a list that consists of at least 22 players, one for each offensive and defensive position, plus various special teams players depending on the press organization that compiles the list. All-Pro lists are exclusively limited to the major leagues, usually only the National Football League; in the past, other leagues recognized as major, such as the American Football League of the 1960s or the All-America Football Conference of the 1940s, have been included in All-Pro lists.

Beginning in the early 1920s, All-Pro teams have traditionally been assembled from press polls of individually voting sportswriters. After polling the writers, the votes are tallied to determine the selected players and the results have historically been published through various news syndicates. Today, the teams are mostly published online or announced on various televised sports programs. Some organizations publish two All-Pro lists, a "First Team" and a "Second Team," with the first consisting of more prominent players than the second.

The Associated Press (AP) and its All-Pro selections are the most widely recognized today. Other polls include the United Press International All-Pro poll, which began in the 1940s and continued in various forms until 1997, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team, which ran from 1954 until 1996, and the Pro Football Writers Association All-Pro teams, which were inaugurated in 1966 and continue to be released annually. The NFL itself compiled official All-Pro lists beginning in 1931 but abandoned the practice in 1942.

The All-Pro designation, while not officially sanctioned by the NFL, is generally considered a more prestigious honor than the NFL's official all-star designation, a Pro Bowl recognition: a minimum of twice as many Pro Bowlers are selected as first and second team All-Pro slots combined, and Pro Bowl selections often drop out, allowing a lesser player to also receive the honor by default, which does not occur with the All-Pro list.

Alphonse Dotson

Alphonse Alan Dotson (born February 25, 1943) is a former American football defensive tackle who played college American football at Grambling State, where he was All-American in 1964.He was drafted by the National Football League's Green Bay Packers in the 2nd round (24th overall) of the 1965 NFL Draft but signed with the American Football League's Kansas City Chiefs and played a year. In 1966, he played for the AFL's Miami Dolphins. From 1967-1970 he played for the AFL's Oakland Raiders, mostly as a backup as he recorded only 4 career starts. The Raiders defensive line of that era was Ike Lassiter, Ben Davidson, Tom Keating, and Dan Birdwell, a group who set the NFL sack record (broken in 1984 by the Chicago Bears), so Dotson did not get a lot of playing time, although he played in most of the games while with the Raiders.His son is Santana Dotson, himself a former All-American and also the 1993 NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and played in two Super Bowls with the Green Bay Packers. He was a Super Bowl champion winning Super Bowl XXXI with the Packers.When his son, Santana, had become a free agent, Alphonse acted as his son's agent used his commission on the deal to purchase 83 acres (340,000 m2) which includes grapevines that covered 1/3 of the land. So now, Dotson is now a grape grower at Certenberg Vineyards in Texas. He also is the president of the Texas Wine and Grape Growers Association.Alphonse Grandson played college American football at the University of Oklahoma who was a part of 2 National Championship games and won 3 Big XII Conference Championships— Alonzo Dotson Who is now a College Scout For the Green Bay Packers, a defensive end.

College Football All-America Team

The College Football All-America Team is an honor given annually to the best American college football players at their respective positions. The original use of the term All-America seems to have been to the 1889 College Football All-America Team selected by Caspar Whitney and published in This Week's Sports in association with football pioneer Walter Camp. Camp took over the responsibility for picking the All-America team and was recognized as the official selector in the early years of the 20th century.

Dick McCann Memorial Award

The Dick McCann Memorial Award is bestowed annually by the Professional Football Writers of America (PFWA) "for long and distinguished reporting on professional football". The award was created in 1969 and is named for Dick McCann, who was the first director of the Hall of Fame. Presentation of the award is made annually at the Pro Football Hall Enshrinement Ceremony. Prior to 2014, the presentation was made at the Enshrinees Dinner.

The list of McCann Award honorees is sometimes referred to as the "writer's wing" of the Hall of Fame.

Football Writers Association of America

The Football Writers Association of America (FWAA) is one of the organizations whose College Football All-America Team is recognized by the NCAA. The organization also selects the Eddie Robinson Coach of the Year, the Bronko Nagurski Trophy winner, the Outland Trophy winner, the Grantland Rice Trophy winner, a freshman All-America team, and weekly defensive player of the week, as well as developing scholarship programs and surveys for better working conditions. Since 1954, the association has awarded the Grantland Rice Trophy to the college football team they choose to be the National Champion.

List of Florida Gators football All-Americans

This list of Florida Gators football All-Americans includes those members of the Florida Gators football team who have received All-American honors from one or more selector organizations. The Florida Gators represent the University of Florida in the sport of American football, and they compete in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Eastern Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC).

Several selector organizations release annual lists of their All-America teams after each college football season, honoring the best players at each position. Selector organizations include football analysts, television networks, publications, media wire services, sports writers' associations, and coaches' associations. Traditionally, several of the selectors have recognized two or more tiers of All-Americans, referred to as the first team, second team, third team and honorable mentions.

The NCAA currently recognizes the All-America teams of five selector organizations to determine "consensus All-Americans" and "unanimous All-Americans" in college football. The NCAA compiles consensus All-Americans using a point system based on the All-America teams from the five selector organizations. The point system consists of three points for a first-team selection, two points for a second-team selection, and one point for a third-team selection; no points are awarded for honorable mention selections. Since 1993, the NCAA-recognized selectors have included the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), the Associated Press (AP), the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), The Sporting News (SN), and the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WCFF), but the number of selectors used by the NCAA has varied over time, and has included different organizations in the past. The players receiving the most points at each position are recognized as consensus All-Americans; in order for a player to receive unanimous All-American recognition, he must be a first-team selection by all of the NCAA-recognized selector organizations.Since the Florida Gators football team played its first season in 1906, eighty-nine Gators football players have received one or more selections as first-team All-Americans. Included among these players are thirty-one consensus All-Americans, of which six were also unanimous All-Americans. The first Florida player to be recognized as a first-team All-American was end Dale Van Sickel, a member of the great Gators eleven of 1928. Florida's first consensus All-American was quarterback Steve Spurrier, who was the winner of the Heisman Trophy in 1966.

List of sports writers

The following is a partial list of sports writers.

Lynn Matthews

Lynn Otto Matthews (born 1944) is an American former college football player who was recognized as an All-American. Matthews later became a newspaper publishing executive.

National Cartoonists Society Division Awards

The National Cartoonists Society Division Awards is an award for cartoonists organized by the National Cartoonists Society. In 2015, the Division Awards were renamed as the Silver Reuben Awards.

Newspaper Enterprise Association

The Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA) is an editorial column and comic strip newspaper syndication service based in the United States and established in 1902. The oldest syndicate still in operation, the NEA was originally a secondary news service to the Scripps Howard News Service; it later evolved into a general syndicate best known for syndicating the comic strips Alley Oop, Our Boarding House, Freckles and His Friends, The Born Loser, Frank and Ernest, and Captain Easy / Wash Tubbs; in addition to an annual Christmas comic strip. Along with United Feature Syndicate, the NEA was part of United Media from 1978 to 2011, and is now a division of Andrews McMeel Syndication. The NEA once selected college All-America teams, and presented awards in professional football.

Olderman

Olderman is a Swedish surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Bob Olderman (1962–1993), American football player

Murray Olderman (born 1922), American cartoonist

Rosey Brown

Roosevelt "Rosey" Brown Jr. (October 20, 1932 – June 9, 2004) was an American football player. He was an offensive tackle in the National Football League (NFL) for the New York Giants from 1953 to 1965. He previously played college football for Morgan State University.

After being selected with the 321st pick in the 1953 NFL Draft, he appeared in 162 games for the Giants, missing only four games in a 13-year career. In his prime, between 1956 and 1963, he helped lead the Giants to six division championships and the 1956 NFL Championship Game. He was selected as a first-team All-NFL player eight consecutive years and was also selected to play in the Pro Bowl nine times.

After retiring as a player, Brown remained with the Giants as an assistant coach and later as a scout. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1974 and was named to the NFL's 75th Anniversary All-Time Team in 1994. He was also included on the NFL's 1950s All-Decade Team and The Sporting News' list of the 100 Greatest Football Players.

Spring Valley, New York

Spring Valley is a suburb of New York City, a village in the towns of Ramapo and Clarkstown in Rockland County, New York, United States. It is located north of Chestnut Ridge, east of Airmont and Monsey, south of Hillcrest, and west of Nanuet. The population was 31,347 at the 2010 census, making it the 2nd most populous community in Rockland County, after New City.

Spring Valley spans the border of two towns, occupying an eastern portion of the town of Ramapo and a small western portion of the town of Clarkstown. The village is next to the New York State Thruway (Interstate 87) and is served by a New Jersey Transit train station at the terminus of the Pascack Valley Line.

Spring Valley is 22 miles (35 km) north of Manhattan and 5 miles (8 km) north of the New Jersey border.

World Almanac

The World Almanac and Book of Facts is a US-published reference work and is a bestselling almanac conveying information about such subjects as world changes, tragedies, sports feats, etc.

It has been published yearly from 1868 to 1875, and again every year since 1886. It was number 1 on the Washington Post bestseller list on November 27, 2011. The 2017 edition (ISBN 978-160057-182-4) has 1,008 pages.

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