Murasame-class destroyer (1994)

The Murasame-class destroyer (むらさめ型護衛艦 Murasame-gata-goei-kan) is a class of destroyers, serving with the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF). This is the first class of the second-generation general-purpose destroyers of the JMSDF.[1]

JS Samidare in Pearl Harbor
JS Samidare in Pearl Harbor
Class overview
Name: Murasame-class destroyer
Builders: IHI Tokyo Shipyard and Japan Marine United
Operators:  Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force
Preceded by: Asagiri-class destroyer
Succeeded by: Takanami-class destroyer
Built: 1993–2000
In commission: 1996–
Planned: 14
Completed: 9
Cancelled: 5 (Converted to order for Takanami-class destroyers)
Active: 9
General characteristics
Type: General-purpose destroyer
Displacement:
  • 4,550 tons standard,
  • 6,200 tons hull load
Length: 151 m (495 ft)
Beam: 17.4 m (57 ft 1 in)
Draft: 5.2 m (17 ft 1 in)
Propulsion:
Speed: 30 knots (35 mph; 56 km/h)
Complement: 165
Sensors and
processing systems:
Electronic warfare
& decoys:
Armament:
Aircraft carried: 1 × SH-60J/K anti-submarine helicopter

Background

Since FY1977, the JMSDF started construction of general-purpose destroyers (汎用護衛艦 Hanyou-goei-kan) under the eight ships / eight helicopters concept.[2] In this concept, each flotillas would be composed of one helicopter destroyer (DDH), five general-purpose destroyers (DD), and two guided missile destroyers (DDG).[3] By FY1986, construction of twenty first-generation DDs (twelve Hatsuyuki-class and eight Asagiri-class) required for all four flotillas had been completed.[2]

In the original plan, it was supposed to shift to destroyer escorts for local District Forces afterwards. However, if the use of these first-generation DDs was continued to the full extent of ships' life, the relative performance obsolescence was concerned. Thus the JMSDF decided to advance the construction of the new generation DDs. And this was first class of the second-generation DDs.[1]

Design

The hull design was completely renovated from first-generation DDs. In addition to increasing the size in order to reduce the underwater radiation noise, both superstructure and hull was inclined to reduce the radar cross-section. There is however no angled tripod mainmast like the one of the American Arleigh Burke-class destroyer because of the heavy weather of the Sea of Japan in winter. The aft was designed like a "mini-Oranda-zaka" as with the Kongō-class to avoid interference between helicopters and mooring devices.[4][Note 1]

The engine arrangement is COGAG as same as Asagiri-class, but a pair of engines are updated to Spey SM1C. And the remaining one pair are replaced by LM2500, same as Kongō-class.[4]

Equipment

The basic configuration of the equipment is the same as first-generation DDs, but they are updated and enhanced throughout. Concepts of its combat system were partly based on those of Kongō-class. Two large-screen displays and OJ-663 consoles are introduced in its OYQ-9 combat direction system as Aegis Weapon System (AWS). And OYQ-103 ASW combat systems, based on OYQ-102 of Kongō-class and indirectly AN/SQQ-89, presents an integrated picture of the tactical situation by receiving, combining and processing active and passive sensor data from the hull-mounted array, towed array and sonobuoys.[6]

The advanced OPS-24 active electronically scanned array radar and OPS-28 surface search and target acquisition radar introduced into the fleet with the latter batch of the Asagiri-class remains on board, and there are some new system such as the NOLQ-3 electronic warfare suite and OQS-5 bow mounted sonar.[4]

To enhance the low-observability and combat readiness capability, vertical launching systems were adopted on its missile systems: Mk 41 for VL-ASROC and Mk 48 for Sea Sparrow replace the traditional swivel octuple launchers. And the surface-to-surface missile system is alternated by the SSM-1B of Japanese make.[4] Currently, ships of this class have been switching the point defense missile system from the traditional Sea Sparrow (RIM-7M) to the Evolved Sea Sparrow by FY2012.[7]

Aircraft facility is expanded to accommodate two shipboard helicopters. One Mitsubishi SH-60J/K is a basic load, and another can be accommodated in case of overseas operation.[2]

Ships in the class

Pennant no. Name Laid down Launched Commissioned Home port
DD-101 Murasame (Village Rain) 18 August 1993 23 August 1994 12 March 1996 Yokosuka
DD-102 Harusame (Spring Rain) 11 August 1994 16 October 1995 24 March 1997 Sasebo
DD-103 Yudachi (Evening Downpour) 18 March 1996 19 August 1997 4 March 1999 Ominato
DD-104 Kirisame (Drizzle) 3 April 1996 21 August 1997 18 March 1999 Headquarters: Kure Home port: Sasebo
DD-105 Inazuma (Sudden Lightning) 8 May 1997 9 September 1998 15 March 2000 Kure
DD-106 Samidare (Poetic term for the Rainy Season) 11 September 1997 24 September 1998 21 March 2000 Kure
DD-107 Ikazuchi (Ferocious Thunder) 25 February 1998 24 June 1999 14 March 2001 Yokosuka
DD-108 Akebono (Light of Daybreak) 29 October 1999 25 September 2000 19 March 2002 Sasebo
DD-109 Ariake (Daybreak) 18 May 1999 16 October 2000 6 March 2002 Sasebo

Gallery

Murasame class destroyers in Pearl Harbor

JS Murasame (DD-101), JS Harusame (DD-102), JS Yudachi (DD-103) and JS Kirisame (DD-104) in Pearl Harbor

JDS Harusame DD102

JS Harusame (DD-102)

JDS Inazuma DD105

JS Inazuma (DD-105)

JDS Ariake DD109

JS Ariake (DD-109)

Ariake (DD 109) pulls into Pearl Harbor

JS Ariake (DD-109)

US Navy 101205-N-2013O-034 The Military Sealift Command fleet replenishment oiler USNS Tippecanoe (T-AO 199) refuels the Japan Maritime Self-Defens

JS Ikazuchi (DD-107)

DD 107 JS Ikazuchi

DD-107 JS Ikazuchi

Type 90 (SSM-1B) launcher

Type 90 (SSM-1B) launcher of Murasame class

76 mm 62cal rapid fire gun (OTO Melara 3)

76 mm 62 cal compact gun

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Destroyers built under the First Defense Build-up Plan, including the former Murasame-class, adopted a unique long forecastle style called "Oranda-zaka".[5]

References

  1. ^ a b Kōda 2015, pp. 220-223.
  2. ^ a b c Kōda 2015, pp. 188-207.
  3. ^ Kōda 2015, pp. 167-169.
  4. ^ a b c d Abe 2000, pp. 152-157.
  5. ^ Abe 2000, pp. 54-68.
  6. ^ Yamazaki 2011.
  7. ^ Ministry of Defense, ed. (2011). Administrative review sheet for FY2011 (PDF) (Report) (in Japanese).

Books

Articles

  • Abe, Yasuo (July 2000). "History of JMSDF Destroyers". Ships of the World (in Japanese). Kaijinn-sha (571). NAID 40002155847.
  • Fujiki, Heihachiro (August 2003). "Development of multi-purpose DDs for "8-8 escort flotilla". Ships of the World (in Japanese). Kaijinn-sha (614): 94–99. NAID 40005855328.
  • Yamazaki, Makoto (October 2011). "Combat systems of modern Japanese destroyers". Ships of the World (in Japanese). Kaijin-sha (748): 98–107. NAID 40018965310.

External links

Media related to Murasame class destroyers at Wikimedia Commons

Active electronically scanned array

An active electronically scanned array (AESA) is a type of phased array antenna, which is a computer-controlled array antenna in which the beam of radio waves can be electronically steered to point in different directions without moving the antenna. In the AESA, each antenna element is connected to a small solid-state transmit/receive module (TRM) under the control of a computer, which performs the functions of a transmitter and/or receiver for the antenna. This contrasts with a passive electronically scanned array (PESA), in which all the antenna elements are connected to a single transmitter and/or receiver through phase shifters under the control of the computer. AESA's main use is in radar, and these are known as active phased array radar (APAR).

The AESA is a more advanced, sophisticated, second-generation of the original PESA phased array technology. PESAs can only emit a single beam of radio waves at a single frequency at a time. The AESA can radiate multiple beams of radio waves at multiple frequencies simultaneously. AESA radars can spread their signal emissions across a wider range of frequencies, which makes them more difficult to detect over background noise, allowing ships and aircraft to radiate powerful radar signals while still remaining stealthy.

Japanese destroyer Akebono

Four Japanese destroyers have been named Akebono (曙 / あけぼの, "dawn" or "daybreak"):

Japanese destroyer Akebono (1899), an Ikazuchi-class destroyer of the Imperial Japanese Navy during the Russo-Japanese War

Japanese destroyer Akebono (1930), a Fubuki-class destroyer of the Imperial Japanese Navy during World War II

JDS Akebono (DE-201), a destroyer escort (or frigate) of the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force in 1955

JDS Akebono (DD-108), a Murasame-class destroyer (1994) that entered into service of the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force in 2000

Japanese destroyer Ariake

Four Japanese destroyers have been named Ariake (有明 / ありあけ, ”dawn” or "daybreak"):

Japanese destroyer Ariake (1904), a Harusame-class destroyer of the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) during the Russo-Japanese War

Japanese destroyer Ariake (1934), a Hatsuharu-class destroyer of the IJN during World War II

JDS Ariake (DD-183), a destroyer of the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF), formerly USS Heywood L. Edwards (DD-663)

JS Ariake (DD-109), a Murasame-class destroyer (1994) of the JMSDF launched in 2000

Japanese destroyer Ikazuchi

Four Japanese destroyers have been named Ikazuchi (雷 / いかづち, "thunder"):

Japanese destroyer Ikazuchi (1898), lead ship of the Ikazuchi-class destroyer, a class of six destroyers of the Imperial Japanese Navy during the Russo-Japanese War.

Japanese destroyer Ikazuchi (1931), an Akatsuki-class destroyer (1931) of the Imperial Japanese Navy during World War II.

JDS Ikazuchi (DE-202), lead ship of the Ikazuchi-class destroyer escort, a class of two destroyer escorts of the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force in 1956–1977.

JS Ikazuchi (DD-107), a Murasame-class destroyer (1994) of the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force in 1999.

Japanese destroyer Inazuma

Four Japanese destroyers have been named Inazuma (電 / いなづま, "lightning"):

Japanese destroyer Inazuma (1899), an Ikazuchi-class destroyer of the Imperial Japanese Navy during the Russo-Japanese War

Japanese destroyer Inazuma (1932), an Akatsuki-class destroyer (1931) of the Imperial Japanese Navy during World War II

JDS Inazuma (DE-203), an Ikazuchi-class destroyer escort of the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force in 1956–1977

JS Inazuma (DD-105), a Murasame-class destroyer (1994) of the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force in 1999

Japanese destroyer Murasame

Four Japanese destroyers have borne the name Murasame (村雨 / むらさめ, "passing shower").

Japanese destroyer Murasame (1903) was a Harusame-class destroyer destroyer of the Imperial Japanese Navy, launched in 1902 and decommissioned in 1923.

Japanese destroyer Murasame (1935) was a Shiratsuyu-class destroyer of the Imperial Japanese Navy, launched in 1935 and sunk 1943 in the Battle of Blackett Strait.

JDS Murasame (DD-107) was the lead ship of the Murasame-class destroyer (1958) in the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force, launched in 1958 and deleted in 1988.

JDS Murasame (DD-101) is the lead ship of the Murasame-class destroyer (1994) in the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force, launched in 1994 and as of 2006 still active in service.

Japanese destroyer Murasame (1935)

Murasame (村雨, "Passing Shower") was the third of ten Shiratsuyu-class destroyers, and was built for the Imperial Japanese Navy under the "Circle One" Program (Maru Ichi Keikaku). This vessel should not be confused with the earlier Russo-Japanese War-period Harusame-class torpedo boat destroyer with the same name.

Japanese destroyer Yūdachi

Four Japanese destroyers have been named Yūdachi (夕立 / ゆうだち, "evening shower"):

Japanese destroyer Yūdachi (1906), a Kamikaze-class destroyer (1905) of the Imperial Japanese Navy during World War I

Japanese destroyer Yūdachi (1936), a Shiratsuyu-class destroyer of the Imperial Japanese Navy during World War II

JDS Yūdachi (DD-108), a Murasame-class destroyer (1958) of the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force in 1958

JDS Yūdachi (DD-103), a Murasame-class destroyer (1994) that entered into service of the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force in 1999

Murasame-class destroyer

Murasame-class destroyer may refer to:

Murasame-class destroyer (1958) (1958–1988), a class of destroyers in the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force

Murasame-class destroyer (1994), a third-generation warship class in service with the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force

Murasame-class destroyers
Combatant ship classes of the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force
Helicopter Destroyer (DDH)
Guided Missile Destroyer (DDG)
Destroyer (DD)
All Purpose Destroyer (DDA)
Anti Submarine Destroyer (DDK)
Destroyer Escort (DE)
Frigate Multi-Purpose / Mine(FFM)
Patrol Frigate (PF)
Submarine (SS)
Ocean Minehunters/Minesweepers (MHS)
Coastal Minehunters/Minesweepers (MHC)
Amphibious Warfare

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