Movies!

Movies! is an American free-to-air television network that is owned as a joint venture between Weigel Broadcasting and the Fox Television Stations subsidiary of Fox Corporation. The network's programming emphasizes feature films. The network's programming and advertising operations are based in Weigel Broadcasting's headquarters on North Halsted Street in Chicago, Illinois.

It is available in several markets through digital subchannel affiliations with free-to-air television stations, as well as through carriage on pay television providers through a local affiliate of the network.[3] Movies! provides programming 24 hours a day and broadcasts in the 16:9 widescreen picture format,[4] available in either standard definition or high definition depending on the station's preference.

The network competes with two similarly formatted broadcast networks: This TV (originally operated by Weigel in a joint venture with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, until the former's operational stake was taken over by Tribune Broadcasting on November 1, 2013) and GetTV (owned by Sony Pictures Entertainment); feature films compose the primary source and children's programming the ancillary source of programming on both networks, though This TV also broadcasts classic television series. However unlike This TV and GetTV, Movies! does not edit the films aired to make room for more commercials. A notation in the Movies! title card stating no film alterations is aired at the beginning of every film broadcast.

Movies!
TypeFree-to-air television network
(movies)
Country
AvailabilityNationwide via digital terrestrial television
(U.S. coverage: 61%)[1]
FoundedJanuary 28, 2013
SloganOur name says it all.
HeadquartersChicago, Illinois
Owner
Key people
Launch date
May 27, 2013[2]
Picture format
480i (SDTV)
(transmitted in either 16:9 widescreen or 4:3 letterbox)
AffiliatesList of affiliates
Official website
moviestvnetwork.com

Background

On January 28, 2013, Fox Television Stations and Weigel Broadcasting announced the formation of Movies!, with plans to launch the network on Memorial Day of that year.[2][3][4] Movies! officially launched on May 27, 2013, at 8:10 a.m. Eastern Time, initially debuting on the subchannels of both of the network's co-parents: five Fox and 11 MyNetworkTV owned-and-operated stations owned by Fox Television Stations, and two stations owned by Weigel. Its programming was inaugurated by a ten-minute clip introducing the network, followed by the first film to be telecast on Movies!, the 1975 film Western Take a Hard Ride.[5][6]

Programming

Movies

Described as presenting "a variety of theatrical motion pictures in a new, viewer and advertiser friendly format, not seen on broadcast television to date",[7] films featured on Movies! consist of releases from Walt Disney Studios (including those released by 20th Century Fox); however, titles from Sony Pictures Entertainment (including those released by Columbia Pictures and TriStar Pictures), Paramount Pictures, (including those syndicated by Trifecta Entertainment & Media), Warner Bros., ReTV, Peter Rodgers Organization, Multicom Entertainment Group and CBS Television Distribution are also shown on the network.[8] The network's film roster concentrates mainly on classic films from the 1920s to the 1980s.[6] Movies! broadcasts a featured movie presentation titled "Icons @ 8," airing nightly at 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time; described by the network in its promotions for the block as a "nightly celebration of cinema," the primetime showcase airs films featuring iconic movie stars from the "Golden Age" of cinema onward. It also broadcasts other themed presentations including a Saturday night block of films aimed at a female audience and a daily morning block of Westerns.[9] Movies! presents many of its features in their original aspect ratio (widescreen or full screen) whenever possible,[3] which are either presented in the 16:9 or 4:3 letterboxed format depending on the affiliate's preference in transmitting the subchannel. Scope films, however, are often reformatted from 2.35:1 to 1.85:1.

Films that are broadcast on the network are edited for graphic profanity and inappropriate violent or sexual content, but are not edited for running times to fit in a set time block;[9] start and end times for films airing on the network are influenced by a combination of the film's original running time and the commercial breaks inserted within the broadcast (the network limits the amount of advertising featured during its programming to twelve minutes per hour),[10][9] with airtimes for films varying between the conventional top-and-bottom-of-the-hour scheduling (e.g., 6:30 a.m. or 8:00 p.m.) and incremental airtimes in margins of five minutes (e.g., 2:10 p.m. or 3:55 a.m.) that more closely mirror the scheduling structures of premium cable channels than those of other advertiser-supported networks[5][6] (this scheduling format, which still results in a particular film's running time to be somewhat longer than the original runtime of its theatrical release depending on the content edits, was replicated by GetTV when it launched in February 2014).

Children's programming

In order to meet requirements imposed by the Federal Communications Commission on the amount of educational programming content that a broadcast station must air each week, Movies! airs a three-hour block of children's programs that were originally distributed for syndication on Sunday mornings (currently featuring Dog Tales Classics, Word Travels and Made in Hollywood: Teen Edition). This allows its affiliates to carry the network's full schedule without having to purchase E/I programming from the syndication market to comply with the rules.[6]

Affiliates

As of July 2014, Movies! has current or pending affiliation agreements with television stations in 43 media markets encompassing 22 states and the District of Columbia, covering approximately 49% of the United States.[11][12] Fox Television Stations and Weigel Broadcasting launched Movies! in markets served by a station owned-and-operated by the Fox network or its sister programming service MyNetworkTV. Not all of the Fox Television Stations outlets carried Movies! at launch, WJZY in Charlotte (which came under Fox ownership one month prior to the network's debut) did not begin carrying Movies! until July 1, 2014,[11] due to an existing affiliation agreement with Antenna TV.

In Chicago—where Fox Television Stations and Weigel Broadcasting each own television stations—Fox-owned WPWR-TV serves as that market's charter affiliate of the network, instead of one of Weigel's three stations in that market (WCIU-TV, WWME-CA and WMEU-CD). This makes Movies! the first Weigel-owned network in which the company's Chicago flagship stations do not serve as affiliates (WCIU formerly carried This TV under Weigel ownership before it moved to WGN-TV upon becoming part-owned by Tribune Broadcasting in November 2013, and MeTV is carried on WWME-CD and relayed a subchannel of WCIU). WBND-LD in South Bend, Indiana carries Movies! on its third digital subchannel; WMLW-TV in Milwaukee carried the network from its launch until August 4, 2014, when Movies! moved to a newly created secondary subchannel of ABC affiliate WISN-TV.[13] Following the WISN deal, that station's owner Hearst Television signed affiliation agreements on a piecemeal basis to add Movies! to select stations, mainly those affiliated with networks other than ABC, during late 2014 and early 2015 (Hearst already carries sister network MeTV in a majority of the markets where it owns stations).

In addition to its carriage on the Fox- and Weigel-owned outlets at the network's launch, the network is also carried on the digital subchannels of television stations owned by other broadcasting companies.[14] Soon after its launch, Movies! reached distribution agreements with several broadcasting groups to add the network on the subchannels of some of their stations. The first stations outside of the Fox and Weigel outlets to sign deals to carry the network were KFFV in Seattle, WLWC in Providence (both owned by OTA Broadcasting) and KPXJ in Shreveport (owned by KTBS, LLC) in October 2013, with the three stations adding the network between November 10 and December 10.[15] The following month, in November 2013, Movies! signed affiliation agreements with nine stations owned by Bonten Media Group, Cocola Broadcasting and the Maranatha Broadcasting Company.[16] Four additional stations (in Salt Lake City; Boise; Wausau; and Victoria, Texas), through deals with companies such as the Nexstar Broadcasting Group and Saga Communications, added the network between May and October 2014.[11]

See also

Similar channels

  • GetTV – an American digital multicast television network owned by Sony Pictures Entertainment specializing in classic movies and limited classic TV programming.
  • This TV – sister network co-owned by MGM and Tribune specializing in feature films and limited classic TV programming.

References

  1. ^ Buckman, Adam (July 26, 2016). "Diginets Keep Growing, Despite Auction Cloud". TVNewsCheck. NewsCheck Media. Retrieved November 7, 2016.
  2. ^ a b Malone, Michael (March 25, 2013). "This May Explain Why We Have a Shirtless 'Magnum, P.I.' on Our Cover Today". Broadcasting & Cable. Retrieved June 12, 2014.
  3. ^ a b c Staff (January 28, 2013). "Fox Stations, Weigel Launching Movies! – The 24-Hour Movie Network Will Debut on the Subchannels of 17 Fox O&Os This Spring". TVNewsCheck. Retrieved June 12, 2014.
  4. ^ a b Michael Malone (January 28, 2013). "Fox O&Os, Weigel Launch Movies! Digi-Net – Another Player in Crowded Entertainment Subchannel Space". Broadcasting & Cable. Retrieved June 12, 2014.
  5. ^ a b Duane Dudek (May 23, 2013). "Weigel Introducing New Movies! Channel Monday". The Dudek Abides (blog of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Retrieved June 12, 2014.
  6. ^ a b c d "Movies TV Network – Schedule". Movies!. May 27, 2013. Archived from the original on June 7, 2013.
  7. ^ "Weigel Creates New Digital Network for Fox TV Stations". Time Out Chicago. January 29, 2013. Retrieved June 12, 2014. |first= missing |last= (help)
  8. ^ Gash, Chris (June 18, 2014). "Wily Indies Succeed on Digital Channels Where Majors Struggle". Variety. Retrieved July 8, 2014.
  9. ^ a b c Dudek, Duane (May 23, 2013). "Weigel introducing new MOVIES! channel Monday". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Retrieved July 8, 2014.
  10. ^ "megamovies.cc". Wednesday, 28 December 2016
  11. ^ a b c "Movies! Network Signs Five New Affiliates". TVNewsCheck. June 10, 2014. Retrieved July 5, 2014.
  12. ^ "Stations for Network - Movies!". RabbitEars.info. Retrieved January 18, 2015.
  13. ^ "Facebook status: We can't wait to launch our new "Movies! Milwaukee" network on August 4!". WISN-TV via Facebook. July 25, 2014. Retrieved July 30, 2014.
  14. ^ Kevin Eck (January 31, 2013). "Fox to Debut All Movie Network for Local TV Digital Subchannels". TVSpy (blog of Mediabistro.com). Retrieved June 12, 2014.
  15. ^ "Movies! Adds Seattle, Providence, Shreveport". TVNewsCheck. October 8, 2013. Retrieved July 8, 2014.
  16. ^ "The Movies! Diginet Adds Nine Affiliates". TVNewsCheck. November 7, 2013. Retrieved July 8, 2014.

External links

B movie

A B movie or B film is a low-budget commercial motion picture that is not an arthouse film. In its original usage, during the Golden Age of Hollywood, the term more precisely identified films intended for distribution as the less-publicized bottom half of a double feature (akin to B-sides for recorded music). Although the U.S. production of movies intended as second features largely ceased by the end of the 1950s, the term B movie continues to be used in its broader sense to this day. In its post-Golden Age usage, there is ambiguity on both sides of the definition: on the one hand, the primary interest of many inexpensive exploitation films is prurient; on the other, many B movies display a high degree of craft and aesthetic ingenuity.

In either usage, most B movies represent a particular genre—the Western was a Golden Age B movie staple, while low-budget science-fiction and horror films became more popular in the 1950s. Early B movies were often part of series in which the star repeatedly played the same character. Almost always shorter than the top-billed films they were paired with, many had running times of 70 minutes or less. The term connoted a general perception that B movies were inferior to the more lavishly budgeted headliners; individual B films were often ignored by critics.

Latter-day B movies still sometimes inspire multiple sequels, but series are less common. As the average running time of top-of-the-line films increased, so did that of B pictures. In its current usage, the term has somewhat contradictory connotations: it may signal an opinion that a certain movie is (a) a genre film with minimal artistic ambitions or (b) a lively, energetic film uninhibited by the constraints imposed on more expensive projects and unburdened by the conventions of putatively "serious" independent film. The term is also now used loosely to refer to some higher-budgeted, mainstream films with exploitation-style content, usually in genres traditionally associated with the B movie.

From their beginnings to the present day, B movies have provided opportunities both for those coming up in the profession and others whose careers are waning. Celebrated filmmakers such as Anthony Mann and Jonathan Demme learned their craft in B movies. They are where actors such as John Wayne and Jack Nicholson first became established, and they have provided work for former A movie actors, such as Vincent Price and Karen Black. Some actors, such as Bela Lugosi, Eddie Constantine, Bruce Campbell and Pam Grier, worked in B movies for most of their careers. The term B actor is sometimes used to refer to a performer who finds work primarily or exclusively in B pictures.

Bollywood

Hindi cinema, often known as Bollywood and formerly as Bombay cinema, is the Indian Hindi-language film industry based in Mumbai (formerly Bombay). The term is a portmanteau of "Bombay" and "Hollywood". The industry is related to Tamil film industry (Kollywood), Telugu film industry (Tollywood) and other industries, making up Indian Cinema – the world's largest.Indian cinema is the world's largest film industry in film production, with an annual output of 1,986 feature films in 2017. Bollywood is its largest film producer, with 364 Hindi films produced in 2017. Bollywood represents 43 percent of Indian net box-office revenue; Tamil and Telugu cinema represent 36 percent, and the remaining regional cinema constituted 21 percent in 2014. Bollywood is one of the largest centres of film production in the world. In 2001 ticket sales, Indian cinema (including Bollywood) reportedly sold an estimated 3.6 billion tickets worldwide, compared to Hollywood's 2.6 billion tickets sold. Bollywood films tend to use a colloquial dialect of Hindi-Urdu (or Hindustani), mutually intelligible by Hindi and Urdu speakers, and modern Bollywood films increasingly incorporate elements of Hinglish.The most popular commercial genre in Bollywood since the 1970s has been the masala film, which freely mixes different genres including action, comedy, romance, drama and melodrama along with musical numbers. Masala films generally fall under the musical film genre, of which Indian cinema has been the largest producer since the 1960s when it exceeded the American film industry's total musical output after musical films declined in the West; the first Indian musical talkie was Alam Ara (1931), several years after the first Hollywood musical talkie The Jazz Singer (1927). Bollywood films outside of the commercial masala formula have traditionally been referred to as parallel cinema, which tend to avoid the use of musical numbers. In more recent times, the distinction between commercial masala and parallel cinema has been gradually blurring, as an increasing number of successful commercial films avoid the use of musical numbers, such as Dangal (2016), the highest-grossing Indian film of all time.

Disney Channel

Disney Channel (originally called The Disney Channel from 1983 to 1997 and commonly shortened to Disney from 1997 to 2002) is an American pay television channel that serves as the flagship property of owner Disney Channels Worldwide unit of the Walt Disney Television subsidiary of The Walt Disney Company.

Disney Channel's programming consists of original first-run television series, theatrically released and original made-for-TV movies and select other third-party programming. Disney Channel – which formerly operated as a premium service – originally marketed its programs towards families during the 1980s, and later at younger children by the 2000s. A majority of Disney Channel's original programming is aimed at kids ages 9–16, while its Disney Junior programs are targeted at children 8 years and under.

As of January 2016, Disney Channel is available to approximately 93.9 million pay television households (80.6% of households with at least one television set) in the United States.

Harry Potter (film series)

Harry Potter is a British-American film series based on the eponymous novels by author J. K. Rowling. The series is distributed by Warner Bros. and consists of eight fantasy films, beginning with Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone (2001) and culminating with Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 2 (2011). A spin-off prequel series that will consist of five films started with Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (2016), marking the beginning of the Wizarding World shared media franchise.The series was mainly produced by David Heyman, and stars Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint, and Emma Watson as the three leading characters: Harry Potter, Ron Weasley, and Hermione Granger. Four directors worked on the series: Chris Columbus, Alfonso Cuarón, Mike Newell, and David Yates. Michael Goldenberg wrote the screenplay for Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (2007), while the remaining films had their screenplays written by Steve Kloves. Production took place over ten years, with the main story arc following Harry Potter's quest to overcome his arch-enemy Lord Voldemort.Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, the seventh and final novel in the series, was adapted into two feature-length parts. Part 1 was released in November 2010, and Part 2 was released in July 2011.Four of the series' eight films are among the 50 highest-grossing films of all time, with Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 2 the highest-grossing film in the series and one of 36 films to gross over $1 billion, ranking at number eleven . Without inflation adjustment, it is the third highest-grossing film series with $7.7 billion in worldwide receipts.

IMDb

IMDb (Internet Movie Database) is an online database of information related to films, television programs, home videos and video games, and streaming content online -- including cast, production crew and personnel biographies, plot summaries, trivia, and fan reviews and ratings. An additional fan feature, message boards, was abandoned in February 2017. Originally a fan-operated website, the database is owned and operated by IMDb.com, Inc., a subsidiary of Amazon.

As of October 2018, IMDb has approximately 5.3 million titles (including episodes) and 9.3 million personalities in its database, as well as 83 million registered users.

List of Disney Channel original films

Many television films have been produced for the United States cable network, Disney Channel, since the service's inception in 1983. In its early years, such movies were referred to as Disney Channel Premiere Films. From late 1997 onwards, these television films have been branded under the Disney Channel Original Movies (DCOM) banner.Most of these films were subsequently released on VHS, DVD, or, more recently, Blu-ray. However, many more in the Disney television film library have never been released in any home video format. Originally, DCOMs were released on DVD months after they premiered on Disney Channel, but starting with Princess Protection Program, DVDs for DCOMs have been released one week after they premiere on Disney Channel. Also, although DCOMs have been produced in widescreen HD format since mid-2005, the 2009 release of Princess Protection Program became the first DCOM to receive a widescreen DVD transfer.

The highest-rated premiere for the brand came in August 2007, when High School Musical 2 set a record for basic cable with 17.2 million viewers. The second highest-rated premiere is held by Wizards of Waverly Place: The Movie, which premiered with 11.4 million viewers. Other major DCOM franchises include Camp Rock, The Cheetah Girls, Twitches, Halloweentown, the Teen Beach films, the Zenon trilogy and The Descendants series.

During the Memorial Day holiday weekend of 2016, Disney Channel began to air many of the older DCOMs in a marathon format. The marathon began in celebration of its 100th Disney Channel Original Movie, Adventures in Babysitting. Disney Channel broadcast all of the 99 Disney Channel Original Movies that came before it, beginning with the 51 most popular films airing over the four-day weekend, beginning May 27, 2016. The network continued to screen the rest of its original movies throughout the month of June 2016, before the June 24 premiere of the 100th Disney Channel Original Film.

List of Pixar films

This is a list of films from Pixar Animation Studios, an American CGI film production company based in Emeryville, California, United States. As of 2019, Pixar has released 21 feature films, which were all released by Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures through the Walt Disney Pictures banner. The company produced its first feature-length film, Toy Story, in 1995. Their second production, A Bug's Life, was released in 1998, followed by their first sequel, Toy Story 2, in 1999. Pixar had two releases in a single year twice: Inside Out and The Good Dinosaur in 2015 and Cars 3 and Coco in 2017.

Their upcoming slate of films include Onward and Soul (both 2020), and three untitled films set to be released; one in 2021 and two in 2022.

List of films considered the best

This is a list of films considered "the best ever", so voted in a national or international survey of either critics or the public.

Some surveys focus on all films, while others focus on a particular genre or country. Voting systems differ from poll to poll: some surveys suffer from biases such as self-selection or skewed demographics, while others may be susceptible to forms of interference such as vote-stacking.

List of films considered the worst

The films listed below have been cited by a variety of notable critics in varying media sources as being among the worst films ever made. Examples of such sources include Metacritic, Roger Ebert's list of most-hated films, The Golden Turkey Awards, Leonard Maltin's Movie Guide, Rotten Tomatoes, the Stinkers Bad Movie Awards, Mystery Science Theater 3000, and the Golden Raspberry Awards (the "Razzies"). Films on these lists are generally feature-length films that are commercial in nature (intended to turn a profit), professionally produced (as opposed to amateur productions), and released in theaters, then on television, or more recently through on-demand streaming services.

List of highest-grossing Indian films

This is a ranking of the highest grossing Indian films which includes films from various languages based on the conservative global box office estimates as reported by reputable sources. There is no official tracking of domestic box office figures within India, and Indian sites publishing data are frequently pressured to increase their domestic box office estimates.Indian films have been screened in markets around the world since the early 20th century. As of 2003, there are markets in over 90 countries where films from India are screened. During the first decade of the 21st century, there was a steady rise in the ticket price, a tripling in the number of theaters and an increase in the number of prints of a film being released, which led to a large increase in the box office collections.The majority of highest-grossing Indian films are Bollywood (Hindi) films. As of 2014, Bollywood represents 43% of the net box office revenue in India, while Tamil and Telugu cinema represent 36%, and other regional industries constitute 21%. See List of highest-grossing films in India for domestic gross figures and List of highest-grossing Indian films in overseas markets for overseas gross figures.

List of highest-grossing films

Films generate income from several revenue streams, including theatrical exhibition, home video, television broadcast rights, and merchandising. However, theatrical box office earnings are the primary metric for trade publications in assessing the success of a film, mostly because of the availability of the data compared to sales figures for home video and broadcast rights, but also because of historical practice. Included on the list are charts of the top box office earners (ranked by both the nominal and real value of their revenue), a chart of high-grossing films by calendar year, a timeline showing the transition of the highest-grossing film record, and a chart of the highest-grossing film franchises and series. All charts are ranked by international theatrical box office performance where possible, excluding income derived from home video, broadcasting rights, and merchandise.

Traditionally, war films, musicals, and historical dramas have been the most popular genres, but franchise films have been among the best performers in the 21st century. There is strong interest in the superhero genre, with eight films in the Marvel Cinematic Universe featuring among the nominal top-earners, including four films based on the Avengers comic books charting in the top ten. Other Marvel Comics adaptations have also had success with the Spider-Man and X-Men properties, while films based on Aquaman, Batman, and Superman from DC Comics have generally performed well. Star Wars, Harry Potter, and Peter Jackson's Middle-earth series are also represented in the nominal earnings chart with four films apiece, while the Jurassic Park and Pirates of the Caribbean franchises feature prominently. Although the nominal earnings chart is dominated by films adapted from pre-existing properties and sequels, it is headed by Avatar, which is an original work. Animated family films have performed consistently well, with Disney films enjoying lucrative re-releases prior to the home-video era. Disney also enjoyed later success with films such as Frozen (the highest-grossing animated film), Zootopia, and The Lion King, as well as its Pixar filmography, of which Incredibles 2, Toy Story 3, and the Finding Nemo films have been the best performers. Beyond Disney and Pixar animation, the Despicable Me, Shrek, and Ice Age series have met with the most success.

While inflation has eroded away the achievements of most films from the 1960s and 1970s, there are franchises originating from that period that are still active. Besides the Star Wars and Superman franchises, James Bond and Star Trek films are still being released periodically; all four are among the highest-grossing franchises. Some of the older films that held the record of highest-grossing film still have respectable grosses by today's standards, but no longer compete numerically against today's top-earners in an era of much higher individual ticket prices. When properly adjusted for inflation, however, on that comparative scale Gone with the Wind—which was the highest-grossing film outright for twenty-five years—is still the highest-grossing film of all time. All grosses on the list are expressed in U.S. dollars at their nominal value, except where stated otherwise.

List of programs broadcast by Cartoon Network

This is a list of television programs currently or formerly broadcast by Cartoon Network in the United States. The network was launched on October 1, 1992, and airs mainly animated programming, ranging from action to animated comedy.

In its early years, Cartoon Network's programming was predominantly made up of reruns of Looney Tunes, Tom and Jerry, and Hanna-Barbera shows such as Yogi Bear, Quick Draw McGraw, The Flintstones, The Jetsons, Jonny Quest, and Scooby-Doo. Cartoon Network's first original series were The Moxy Show and the late-night satirical animated talk show, Space Ghost Coast to Coast. The What a Cartoon! series of showcase shorts brought about the creation of a number of Cartoon Network original series, the first of which made into a full-fledged series was Dexter's Laboratory in 1996, followed by Johnny Bravo and Cow and Chicken in 1997 (as well as its spinoff, I Am Weasel later in 1999), The Powerpuff Girls in 1998, and Courage the Cowardly Dog in 1999, which debuted alongside Mike, Lu & Og. Another popular series, Ed, Edd n Eddy was one of the first to air without a What a Cartoon! pilot, debuting in 1999. Dexter's Laboratory creator Genndy Tartakovsky went on to create three more series for Cartoon Network: Samurai Jack, Star Wars: Clone Wars, and Sym-Bionic Titan. Powerpuff Girls creator Craig McCracken later produced Foster's Home for Imaginary Friends for the network. Other series that were greenlit from programs similar to What a Cartoon! include Whatever Happened to Robot Jones?, Codename: Kids Next Door, and The Grim Adventures of Billy & Mandy.

Following the resignation of Jim Samples in 2007, Cartoon Network began airing live-action original series such as Destroy, Build, Destroy and Dude, What Would Happen as part of the CN Real block that ran from 2009-2010. By 2014, Cartoon Network began moving away from live-action programming with the 2010 premieres of Adventure Time and Regular Show as current president Christina Miller succeeded Stuart Snyder.

Cartoon Network has also broadcast a number of feature films, mostly animated or containing animated sequences, under its "Cartoon Theater" block, later renamed "Flicks". Since 2008, they have also been airing live-action movies despite the network not producing any live-action series since 2014.

Lists of films

This is an index of lists of films.

Pornographic film

Pornographic films, or sex films, are films that present sexually explicit subject matter in order to arouse and satisfy the viewer. Pornographic films present sexual fantasies and usually include erotically stimulating material such as nudity and sexual intercourse. A distinction is sometimes made between "erotic" films and "pornographic" films on the basis that the latter contain more explicit sexuality, and focus more on arousal than storytelling, but the distinction is highly subjective.

Pornographic films are produced and distributed on a variety of media, depending on demand and the technology available, including traditional film stock in various formats, video for home viewing, DVDs, Internet download, cable TV and other media. Today, pornographic films can be sold or rented on DVD, shown through Internet streaming and special channels and pay-per-view on cable and satellite, and in rapidly disappearing adult theaters. They are generally not permitted to be shown in mainstream cinemas or on free-to-air television.

Films with risqué content have been produced since the invention of the motion picture in the 1880s. Production of such films was profitable, and a number of producers began to specialize in their production. However, various groups within society considered such depictions immoral, labelling them pornographic, and attempting to have them suppressed under obscenity laws, with varying degrees of success. Such films continued to be produced but could only be distributed by underground channels. Because the viewing of such films carried a social stigma, they were viewed at brothels, adult movie theaters, stag parties, at home, in private clubs and also at night cinemas. Only in the 1970s, during the Golden Age of Porn, were pornographic films semi-legitimized; and by the 1980s, pornography on home video achieved wider distribution. The rise of the Internet in the late 1990s and early 2000s similarly changed the way pornographic films were distributed and furthermore, complicating the censorship regimes around the world and the legal prosecution of obscenity.

Science fiction film

Science fiction film (or sci-fi film) is a genre that uses rtd-speculative, fictional science-based depictions of phenomena that are not fully accepted by mainstream science, such as extraterrestrial lifeforms, alien worlds, extrasensory perception and time travel, along with futuristic elements such as spacecraft, robots, cyborgs, interstellar travel or other technologies. Science fiction films have often been used to focus on political or social issues, and to explore philosophical issues like the human condition. In many cases, tropes derived from written science fiction may be used by filmmakers ignorant of or at best indifferent to the standards of scientific plausibility and plot logic to which written science fiction is traditionally held.The genre has existed since the early years of silent cinema, when Georges Melies' A Trip to the Moon (1902) employed trick photography effects. The next major example in the genre was the film Metropolis (1927). From the 1930s to the 1950s, the genre consisted mainly of low-budget B movies. After Stanley Kubrick's landmark 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), the science fiction film genre was taken more seriously. In the late 1970s, big-budget science fiction films filled with special effects became popular with audiences after the success of Star Wars and paved the way for the blockbuster hits of subsequent decades.

Star Wars

Star Wars is an American epic space-opera media franchise created by George Lucas. The franchise began with the eponymous 1977 film and quickly became a worldwide pop-culture phenomenon.

The first film, later subtitled Episode IV – A New Hope, was followed by the sequels Episode V – The Empire Strikes Back (1980) and Episode VI – Return of the Jedi (1983), forming what is collectively referred to as the original trilogy. A prequel trilogy was later released, consisting of Episode I – The Phantom Menace (1999), Episode II – Attack of the Clones (2002) and Episode III – Revenge of the Sith (2005). Finally, a sequel trilogy began with Episode VII – The Force Awakens (2015), continued with Episode VIII – The Last Jedi (2017), and will conclude with Episode IX – The Rise of Skywalker (2019). The first eight films were nominated for Academy Awards (with wins going to the first two released) and were commercially successful. Together with the theatrical anthology films Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (2016) and Solo: A Star Wars Story (2018), the films combined box office revenue equates to over US$9 billion, and is currently the second-highest-grossing film franchise.The film series expanded into other media, including television series, video games, novels, comic books, theme park attractions and themed areas, as well as other kinds of media, resulting in an all encompassing fictional universe, which, in 2014, required an almost total reboot, resulting in the formation of the distinct Star Wars Legends continuity of (fictional) events, now obsolete, which includes media preceding the reboot and a few later releases. Star Wars holds a Guinness World Records title for the "Most successful film merchandising franchise". In 2018, the total value of the Star Wars franchise was estimated at US$65 billion, and it is currently the fifth-highest-grossing media franchise of all-time.

Television film

A television film (also known as a TV movie, TV film, television movie, telefilm, telemovie, motion picture made for television, made-for-television movie, made-for-television film, direct-to-TV movie, direct-to-TV film, movie of the week, feature-length drama, single drama and original movie) is a feature-length motion picture that is produced and originally distributed by or to, a television network, in contrast to theatrical films, which are made explicitly for initial showing in movie theaters.

The Fast and the Furious

The Fast and the Furious (colloquial: Fast & Furious) is an American media franchise centered on a series of action films that is largely concerned with illegal street racing, heists and spy. The franchise also includes short films, a television series, live shows, and theme park attractions. It is distributed by Universal Pictures.

The first film was released in 2001, which began the original trilogy of films focused on racing, and culminated in the standalone film The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift (2006). The series then went under a soft reboot with Fast & Furious (2009), which transitioned the series toward heists and spying, and concluded with The Fate of the Furious (2017). Two final films are planned, and are set to be released in 2020, and 2021, respectively.

Universal expanded the series to include the spin-off film Hobbs & Shaw (2019), while its subsidiary DreamWorks Animation followed this with the animated web television series Fast & Furious: Spy Racers. Soundtrack albums have been released for all the films, as well compilation albums containing existing music heard in the films. Two short films that tie into the series have also been released, while a female centered spin-off is also in development.

The series has been commercially successful and generally received mixed critical reception . The Fast and the Furious is Universal's biggest franchise of all time, and currently ranks as the ninth-highest-grossing film series of all time with a combined gross of over $5 billion. The series has also been the focus of other media, including attractions at Universal Studios Hollywood, live shows, commercials, many video games, and toys. It is also considered the vehicle which propelled lead actors Vin Diesel and Paul Walker to stardom.

The Lord of the Rings (film series)

The Lord of the Rings is a film series of three epic fantasy adventure films directed by Peter Jackson, based on the eponymous novel written by J. R. R. Tolkien. The films are subtitled The Fellowship of the Ring (2001), The Two Towers (2002) and The Return of the King (2003). They are a New Zealand-American venture, produced and distributed by New Line Cinema with the co-production of WingNut Films.

Set in the fictional world of Middle-earth, the films follow the hobbit Frodo Baggins (Elijah Wood) as he and the Fellowship embark on a quest to destroy the One Ring, to ensure the destruction of its maker, the Dark Lord Sauron. The Fellowship eventually splits up and Frodo continues the quest with his loyal companion Sam (Sean Astin) and the treacherous Gollum (Andy Serkis). Meanwhile, Aragorn (Viggo Mortensen), heir in exile to the throne of Gondor, along with Legolas (Orlando Bloom), Gimli (John Rhys-Davies), Merry (Dominic Monaghan), Pippin (Billy Boyd) and the wizard Gandalf (Ian McKellen), unite to rally the Free Peoples of Middle-earth in the War of the Ring in order to aid Frodo by weakening Sauron's forces.

The three films were shot simultaneously and entirely in Jackson's native New Zealand from October 1999 until December 2000, with pickup shots done from 2001 to 2004. It was one of the biggest and most ambitious film projects ever undertaken, with a reported budget of $281 million. An extended edition of each film was released on home video a year after its theatrical release.

The Lord of the Rings is widely regarded as one of the greatest and most influential film trilogies ever made. It was a major financial success, and is among the highest-grossing film series of all time with over $2.9 billion in worldwide receipts. Each film was critically acclaimed and heavily awarded, winning 17 out of their 30 Academy Award nominations.

Turner Classic Movies

Turner Classic Movies (TCM) is an American movie-oriented pay-TV network operated by Warner Bros. Entertainment, a subsidiary of AT&T's WarnerMedia. Launched in 1994, TCM is headquartered at Turner's Techwood broadcasting campus in the Midtown business district of Atlanta, Georgia.

Historically, the channel's programming consisted mainly of classic theatrically released feature films from the Turner Entertainment film library – which comprises films from Warner Bros. (covering films released before 1950), Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (covering films released before May 1986), and the North American distribution rights to films from RKO Pictures.

However, TCM also licenses films from other studios, and occasionally shows more recent films.

The channel is available in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Malta, Latin America, France, Italy, Greece, Cyprus, Spain, the Nordic countries, the Middle East, Africa and Asia-Pacific.

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