Mount Royal Range

The Mount Royal Range is a mountain range in the Hunter region of New South Wales, Australia.

Mount Royal
Mount Royal - from Mount Cabrebald
Highest point
PeakBrumlow Tops
Elevation1,586 m (5,203 ft)
Dimensions
Length95 km (59 mi) S
Geography
Mount Royal Range is located in New South Wales
Mount Royal Range
Location of the range in New South Wales.
CountryAustralia
StateNew South Wales
RegionHunter
Range coordinates31°50′S 151°29′E / 31.833°S 151.483°ECoordinates: 31°50′S 151°29′E / 31.833°S 151.483°E
Parent rangeGreat Dividing Range

Location and features

The Mount Royal Range is a spur on the eastern side of the Great Dividing Range. It diverges from the Liverpool Range at a point north of Scone, New South Wales, near Ben Halls Gap. The range generally extends to the southeast for about 45 kilometres (28 mi) and then generally to the south southwest for about 50 kilometres (31 mi) to Mount Royal.[1] The range generally forms the divide between the Hunter River and Manning River drainage basins, both of which drain to the Tasman Sea.

The range contains a number of prominent peaks including:[2]

  • Brumlow Tops with an elevation of 1,586 metres (5,203 ft) AHD
  • Mount Polblue with an elevation of 1,575 metres (5,167 ft) AHD[3]
  • Mount Barrington with an elevation of 1,555 metres (5,102 ft) AHD
  • Mount Royal with an elevation of 1,185 metres (3,888 ft) AHD
  • Mount Allyn with an elevation of 1,125 metres (3,691 ft) AHD
  • Gulph Mountain
  • Gog and Magog
  • The Pinnacle
  • Paddys Ridge
  • Mount William
  • Mount Paterson
  • Mount Toonumbue
  • the Belgrave Pinnacle
  • Mirannie Mountain
  • Mount George
  • Hudsons Peak
  • Mount Johnstone

Etymology

The range is named after Mount Royal, one of its prominent peaks.

Water storage

To provide water for the Bayswater Power Station, the Barnard River Scheme was constructed in the 1980s so water could be transported over the range into the Hunter River.

Geology

The Mount Royal range forms the northern rim of the Hunter Region. The Barrington Tops, an elevated plateau at the headwaters of the Barrington River, are part of the Mount Royal Range. The World Heritage listed Barrington Tops National Park includes this area.

Gallery

Mount Royal - eucalyptus forest

Mount Royal - eucalyptus forest

Mount Royal - eucalytus forest 2

Mount Royal - eucalyptus forest

Mount Royal - basalt outcrop 1100 metres asl

Mount Royal, basalt at 1100 metres

Mount Royal - moss forest

Mount Royal - cloud forest, moss & ferns

Mount Royal - moss forest 2

Mount Royal - cloud forest, basalt & ferns

Mount Royal - moss forest 3

Mount Royal, cloud forest, basalt, ferns & moss

Mount Royal - rainforest summit

Mount Royal, cloud forest, Hill water gum rainforest at summit

Brumlow Tops

Snow Gums at Brumlow Tops summit, elevation 1586 metres, the highest point in northern New South Wales

See also

References

  1. ^ "Mount Royal Range". Geographical Names Register (GNR) of NSW. Geographical Names Board of New South Wales. Retrieved 19 October 2013. Edit this at Wikidata
  2. ^ "Mountain systems of Australia". Australian Bureau of Statistics:Year Book Australia, 1909. Retrieved 2008-02-04.
  3. ^ "Barrington Tops World Heritage Area". Retrieved 2008-02-04.
Allyn Range

The Allyn Range is a mountain range in New South Wales, Australia. It is part of the Barrington Tops region and joins the Mount Royal Range on the Barrington Tops plateau to the north. High points on the range include Eremeren Point, Ben Bullen, Mount Gunama, Mount Lumeah and Mount Allyn.The range is heavily forested and much of it is a wilderness area covered in Antarctic Beech cool temperate rainforest. Just below the range is Burraga Swamp. Apart from a dirt road drive to Mount Allyn, access is limited and difficult. It is suggested the range is hazardous to light aircraft, as cloud and fog are often present.

Alyxia ruscifolia

Alyxia ruscifolia, commonly known as the chainfruit or prickly alyxia, is a shrub of high rainfall areas in eastern Australia. The natural range of distribution is from Wollongong in New South Wales to the Wet Tropics and further north to New Guinea.

It can be seen in a variety of different situations. Such as the sub tropical Lord Howe Island, surrounded by the ocean, or the tropical rainforest understorey at Kuranda in Queensland. Or the exposed rocky cliffs on the Mount Royal Range in New South Wales, where it is subject to high winds and snow. The habitat is many types of rainforests from sea level to 1200 metres, sometimes also seen in sclerophyll forests.

Barnard River

Barnard River, a perennial river of the Manning River catchment, is located in the Northern Tablelands and Mid North Coast districts of New South Wales, Australia.

Barnard River Scheme

The Barnard River Scheme is an inter-basin water transfer system in New South Wales, which can transfer water from the Barnard River in the upper Manning River catchment over the Mount Royal Range into the Hunter River.

The scheme was constructed between 1983 and 1985, to provide drought relief water for Bayswater Power Station which was being constructed at the same time.

The scheme consists of:

a weir on the Barnard River, which transfers water into a small dam on Orham Creek via a gravity channel

a pair of pumping stations which pump the water through pipelines to Bralga Tops

another pipeline feeding downhill into Oaky Creek, which is a tributary of the Hunter River.

Barrington Tops National Park

The Barrington Tops National Park is a protected national park located in the Hunter Valley, approximately 200 kilometres (120 mi) north of Sydney in New South Wales, Australia. Gazetted in 1969, the 76,512-hectare (189,070-acre) park is situated between Scone, Singleton, Dungog, Gloucester and East Gresford.

The park is part of the Barrington Tops group World Heritage Site Gondwana Rainforests of Australia inscribed in 1986 and added to the Australian National Heritage List in 2007.It is also part of the Barrington Tops and Gloucester Tops Important Bird Area.

Brumlow Top

Brumlow Top is a hill on the Barrington Tops plateau, in the Mid-Coast Council in New South Wales, Australia.

At 1,586 m (5,203 ft) above sea level, it is the highest point in northern New South Wales. The surrounding area is covered by sub alpine Snow Gum woodland and high altitude swamps and is contained with the Barrington Tops National Park.

Careys Peak

Careys Peak is a peak in the Williams Range, part of the Mount Royal Range, located in the Upper Hunter region of New South Wales, Australia. At 1,544 metres (5,066 ft) above sea level, it is one of the higher points in Barrington Tops National Park, some 200 kilometres (120 mi) north of Sydney. The peak is at the edge of the Barrington Tops plateau, within the declared wilderness of the World Heritage Gondwana Rainforests of Australia.

Wilderness streams, such as the Allyn River and Williams River rise nearby. On a clear day, the higher peaks of the Blue Mountains may be seen. And looking south east, the sands of Stockton Beach on the coast may be viewed. The scenic appeal of the area is well regarded. Particularly the large dark stands of rainforest and snow gum wilderness. Careys Peak is a popular camping and bushwalking destination. Many years ago, a skiing slope was cleared behind Careys Peak. It has since disappeared in natural bush re-growth.The historic hut was built around the year 1934. It was crushed by a fallen tree in the 1970s. Rebuilt in 1973 and repaired again in 2007. Closing the four wheel drive tracks to vehicular traffic is said to slow the spread of invasive weeds, such as Scotch broom, mist flower and crofton weed.

Dilgry River

Cobark River, a perennial river of the Manning River catchment, is located in the Upper Hunter district of New South Wales, Australia.

Hunter River (New South Wales)

The Hunter River (Wonnarua: Coquun) is a major river in New South Wales, Australia. The Hunter River rises in the Liverpool Range and flows generally south and then east, reaching the Tasman Sea at Newcastle, the second largest city in New South Wales and a major harbour port. Its lower reaches form an open and trained mature wave dominated barrier estuary.

Moonan Brook

Moonan Brook, a mostly perennial stream of the Hunter River catchment, is located in the Hunter region of New South Wales, Australia.

Moppy River

Moppy River, a perennial river of the Manning River catchment, is located in the Upper Hunter district of New South Wales, Australia.

Mount Barrington

Mount Barrington, a mountain that is part of the Mount Royal Range, is located on the Barrington Tops plateau in the Mid-Coast Council within New South Wales, Australia and has an elevation of 1,555 metres (5,102 ft) above sea level.

Now the remnants of a volcano, Mount Barrington, formerly the Barrington Volcano, erupted near its present peak between 44 and 54 million years ago. The eruption caused a 700-cubic-kilometre (170 cu mi) basalt flow, which covered much of the Barrington Tops plateau. The lava was up to 1,000 metres (3,300 ft) thick.

The extensive rainforests in the area grow on much of the resultant red/brown soils. Gemstones such as zircon, sapphire and ruby were formed from the volcano. Nearby Careys Peak is considered a vent in this extinct shield volcano. The surrounding area is covered by sub alpine Snow Gum woodland, with rainforest on the escarpment edge and in fire free gullies.

Mount Royal (New South Wales)

Mount Royal is situated at the southern end of the Mount Royal Range in the Barrington Tops region of eastern Australia. It is part of the World Heritage Gondwana Rainforests of Australia.

The lower sections of the mountain are made up of sedimentary rocks such as mudstones. A residual basalt cap appears at 1,100 metres (3,600 ft) above sea level. It originated from the flow of the nearby Barrington Volcano. The mountain is partially in Mount Royal National Park and Barrington Tops National Park.

Mount Royal National Park

The Mount Royal National Park is a protected national park located in the Hunter region of New South Wales, Australia. Gazetted in 1997, the 6,920-hectare (17,100-acre) park is situated approximately 187 kilometres (116 mi) north of Sydney.

The park is part of the Barrington Tops group World Heritage Site Gondwana Rainforests of Australia inscribed in 1986 and added to the Australian National Heritage List in 2007.

Peel River (New South Wales)

Peel River, a watercourse that is part of the Namoi catchment within the Murray–Darling basin, is located in the North West Slopes and Plains district of New South Wales, Australia.

The river rises on the northern slopes of the Liverpool Range, at the junction of the Great Dividing Range and Mount Royal Range, south of the village of Nundle, and flows generally north, west and north west and emerges into the Liverpool Plains near Tamworth. The Peel River is joined by thirteen tributaries, including the Cockburn River, and flows through Chaffey Dam before reaching its mouth at the confluence with the Namoi River; dropping 457 metres (1,499 ft) over its course of 210 kilometres (130 mi).From source to mouth, the river passes through or near the villages of Nundle, Woolomin and Piallamore.

The Peel River was first discovered by European settlers in 1818 by John Oxley and named by Oxley in honour of Sir Robert Peel, an important British politician at the time of its discovery by British settlers in Australia.A Tamworth, the river is crossed by the Main North line via the heritage-listed Tamworth rail bridge, completed in 1882.The famous Australian freshwater native fish Murray cod, Maccullochella peelii, was named after the Peel River by Major Mitchell, who sketched and scientifically described and named one of the numerous Murray cod his men caught from the river on his 1838 expedition.

Pigna Barney River

Pigna Barney River, a partly perennial river of the Manning River catchment, is located in the Upper Hunter district of New South Wales, Australia.

Polblue

Polblue is a hill on the Barrington Tops plateau, located in the Mid-Coast Council within New South Wales, Australia.

At 1,575 metres (5,167 ft) above sea level, Polblue is the second highest point in the area after Brumlow Top. The surrounding area is covered by sub alpine snow gum woodland and high altitude swamps. Nearby is a popular camping ground and bushwalking trails contained with the Barrington Tops National Park.

Rouchel Brook

Rouchel Brook, a perennial stream of the Hunter River catchment, is located in the Hunter region of New South Wales, Australia.

Stewarts Brook

Stewarts Brook, a perennial stream of the Hunter River catchment, is located in the Hunter region of New South Wales, Australia.

Coastal mountain ranges
(not part of the
Great Dividing Range)
Great Dividing Range
Inland mountain ranges
Island mountain ranges
Mountains not within a specific range
Towns, suburbs and localities of Dungog Shire, Hunter Region, New South Wales
Towns, suburbs and localities
Rivers and other waterways
Other places and points of interest
Significant places and items of interest in the Hunter Region of New South Wales

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.