Mount Olivet Cemetery (Middletown, New Jersey)

Mount Olivet Cemetery is a cemetery in Middletown, New Jersey. Vince Lombardi and his wife, Marie, are buried there.[1]

Mount Olivet Cemetery
Details
Location
Coordinates40°22′29″N 74°04′53″W / 40.3748°N 74.0815°WCoordinates: 40°22′29″N 74°04′53″W / 40.3748°N 74.0815°W
Find a GraveMount Olivet Cemetery

References

  1. ^ "Packer legend Vince Lombardi's saga begins in Brooklyn and ends in N.J", NY Daily News, 2008, retrieved 2011-02-13
Mount Olivet Cemetery

Mount Olivet Cemetery may refer to:

In Canada:

Mount Olivet Cemetery (Halifax), Nova ScotiaIn the United States:

Mount Olivet Cemetery (Wheat Ridge, Colorado)

Mount Olivet Cemetery (Chicago), Illinois

Mount Olivet Cemetery (Dubuque, Iowa)

Mount Olivet Cemetery (New Orleans), Louisiana

Mt. Olivet Episcopal Church and Cemetery, Pineville, Louisiana, listed on the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP)

Mount Olivet Cemetery (Baltimore), Maryland

Mount Olivet Cemetery (Frederick), Maryland

Mount Olivet Cemetery (Detroit), Michigan

Mount Olivet Cemetery (Cascade County, Montana)

Mount Olivet Cemetery (Middletown, New Jersey)

Mount Olivet Cemetery, Newark

Mount Olivet Cemetery (Queens), New York

Mount Olivet Cemetery (Tonawanda), New York

Mount Olivet Cemetery (Hanover, Pennsylvania)

Mt. Olivet Cemetery (Jackson, Tennessee), NRHP-listed in Madison County

Mount Olivet Cemetery (Nashville), Tennessee, NRHP-listed

Mount Olivet Cemetery (Fort Worth, Texas)

Mount Olivet Cemetery (Salt Lake City), Utah

Mount Olivet Cemetery (Washington, D.C.)

Mount Olivet Cemetery (Janesville, Wisconsin)

Mount Olivet Cemetery (Milwaukee), Wisconsin

Vince Lombardi

Vincent Thomas Lombardi (June 11, 1913 – September 3, 1970) was an American football player, coach, and executive in the National Football League (NFL). He is best known as the head coach of the Green Bay Packers during the 1960s, where he led the team to three straight and five total NFL Championships in seven years, in addition to winning the first two Super Bowls at the conclusion of the 1966 and 1967 NFL seasons. Following his sudden death from cancer in 1970, the NFL Super Bowl trophy was named in his honor. He was enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1971, the year after his death. Lombardi is considered by many to be the greatest coach in football history, and he is more significantly recognized as one of the greatest coaches and leaders in the history of any American sport.Lombardi began his coaching career as an assistant and later as a head coach at St. Cecilia High School in Englewood, New Jersey. He was an assistant coach at Fordham, at the United States Military Academy, and with the New York Giants before becoming a head coach for the Green Bay Packers from 1959 to 1967 and the Washington Redskins in 1969. He never had a losing season as a head coach in the NFL, compiling a regular season winning percentage of 72.8% (96–34–6), and 90% (9–1) in the postseason for an overall record of 105 wins, 35 losses, and 6 ties in the NFL.

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