Mount Marcus Baker

Mount Marcus Baker is the highest peak of the Chugach Mountains of Alaska. It is located approximately 75 miles (121 km) east of Anchorage. This peak is very prominent because of its proximity to tidewater and is only 12 miles (19 km) north of the calving face of Harvard Glacier. When ranked by topographic prominence, Mount Marcus Baker is one of the top 75 peaks in the world.

Mount Marcus Baker
Mt Marcus Baker
Highest point
Elevation13,176 ft (4,016 m)  NGVD 29[1]
Prominence10,726 ft (3,269 m) [1]
Isolation204 kilometres (127 mi)
Listing
Coordinates61°26′16″N 147°45′02″W / 61.4377778°N 147.7505556°WCoordinates: 61°26′16″N 147°45′02″W / 61.4377778°N 147.7505556°W[2]
Geography
Mount Marcus Baker is located in Alaska
Mount Marcus Baker
Mount Marcus Baker
Location in Alaska
LocationMatanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska, U.S.
Parent rangeChugach Mountains
Topo mapUSGS Anchorage B-3 Quadrangle
Climbing
First ascent1938 by Norman Bright, Peter Gabriel, Norman Dyhrenfurth, Bradford Washburn
Easiest routeSnow/ice climb (Alaska grade 2)

History

Mount Marcus Baker was originally called "Mount Saint Agnes"; according to Bradford Washburn, James W. Bagley of the USGS named it after his wife Agnes, adding the "Saint" in hopes of making the name stick. The name was later changed to honor a cartographer and geologist named Marcus Baker.[3]

The peak was first climbed on June 19, 1938 by a party led by famed explorer Bradford Washburn; the climb took almost two months owing to weather delays. Today's standard route is the North Ridge. Despite being much lower in elevation than Denali, Marcus Baker is a similarly serious ascent, due to the remoteness of the peak and the resulting length of the approach and climb.[3] A number of noted climbers have perished or sustained permanent injury in attempting to summit the peak as climbing conditions can change rapidly as storms arise. In early 1988, a State of Alaska Fish and Game biologist, 28-year-old Sylvia Jean Lane, succumbed to hypothermia as a two-day storm separated her from the two others in the climbing party attempting to dash to the top in a winter ascent.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Mount Marcus Baker, Alaska". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 2013-01-19.
  2. ^ "Mount Marcus Baker". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2013-01-19.
  3. ^ a b Michael Wood and Colby Coombs, Alaska: A Climbing Guide, The Mountaineers, 2001.

External links

Arc Dome

Arc Dome is the highest mountain of the Toiyabe Range in northwestern Nye County, Nevada, United States. It is the thirteenth-highest mountain in the state. Arc Dome also ranks as the second-most topographically prominent peak in Nye County and the eighth-most prominent peak in the state. The peak is located about 53 miles (85 km) north of the community of Tonopah, within the Arc Dome Wilderness of the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest.

Arc Dome is sometimes confused with Toiyabe Dome. The fact that the summit benchmark is marked “Toiyabe Dome” only adds to this confusion. However, these are separate peaks. Toiyabe Dome at 11,361 feet (3,463 m) is about 5 miles (8.0 km) southeast of Arc Dome, above the small community of Carvers, Nevada.

Chugach Mountains

The Chugach Mountains of southern Alaska are the northernmost of the several mountain ranges that make up the Pacific Coast Ranges of the western edge of North America. The range is about 250 miles (402 km) long and 60 miles (97 km) wide, and extends from the Knik and Turnagain Arms of the Cook Inlet on the west to Bering Glacier, Tana Glacier, and the Tana River on the east. It is bounded on the north by the Matanuska, Copper, and Chitina rivers. The highest point of the Chugach Mountains is Mount Marcus Baker, at 13,094 feet (3,991 m), but with an average elevation of 4,006 feet (1,221 m), most of its summits are not especially high. Even so, its position along the Gulf of Alaska ensures more snowfall in the Chugach than anywhere else in the world, an annual average of over 1500 cm (800 in).The mountains are protected in the Chugach State Park and the Chugach National Forest. Near to Anchorage, they are a popular destination for outdoor activities.

The Richardson Highway, Seward Highway, Portage Glacier Highway, and the Glenn Highway run through the Chugach Mountains. The Anton Anderson Memorial Tunnel of the Portage Glacier Highway provides railroad and automobile access underneath Maynard Mountain between Portage Lake and the city of Whittier on Prince William Sound.

Delano Peak

Delano Peak is the highest point in the Tushar Mountains of south-central Utah. The Tushars are the third-highest range in the state, after the Uinta Mountains and the La Sal Range, though Delano itself is surpassed in height by at least thirty-one other Utah peaks.

Located in the Fishlake National Forest, Delano Peak is the highest point in both Beaver and Piute counties. The mountain is named for Columbus Delano (1809–1896), Secretary of the Interior during the Grant administration.

Deseret Peak

Deseret Peak is the highest peak in the Stansbury Mountains. It is located in the Deseret Peak Wilderness area west of Grantsville, Utah and east of Skull Valley Indian Reservation. The site is a popular destination for hikers as the area is a contrast of the alpine wilderness with the surrounding desert basin. The trail that leads to the peak is easily accessible from Salt Lake City. The mountain offers views of the Bonneville Salt Flats, the Great Salt Lake, and the surrounding towns and mountain ranges. On a clear day, it is possible to see Mount Nebo, the highest peak in the adjacent Wasatch Mountains.

Granite Peak (Humboldt County, Nevada)

Granite Peak is the highest mountain in both the Santa Rosa Range and Humboldt County, in Nevada, United States. It is the eighteenth-most topographically prominent peak in the state. The peak is located within the Santa Rosa Ranger District of the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest, about 12 miles north of the small town of Paradise Valley and 23 miles southeast of the small town of McDermitt. It is the highest mountain for over 80 miles in all directions.

Hayford Peak

Hayford Peak, elevation 9,924 feet (3,025 m), is the highest mountain in the Sheep Range of Clark County, Nevada, United States. It is the seventh-most topographically prominent peak in the state. The nearest taller mountain is Mount Charleston, 34 miles (55 km) to the southwest. In the winter months, there is snow on the peak, which usually lasts until early spring.

List of mountain peaks of Alaska

This article comprises three sortable tables of major mountain peaks of the U.S. State of Alaska.

The summit of a mountain or hill may be measured in three principal ways:

The topographic elevation of a summit measures the height of the summit above a geodetic sea level. The first table below ranks the 100 highest major summits of Alaska by elevation.

The topographic prominence of a summit is a measure of how high the summit rises above its surroundings. The second table below ranks the 100 most prominent summits of Alaska.

The topographic isolation (or radius of dominance) of a summit measures how far the summit lies from its nearest point of equal elevation. The third table below ranks the 50 most isolated major summits of Alaska.

List of mountain peaks of the United States

This article comprises three sortable tables of major mountain peaks of the United States of America.

The summit of a mountain or hill may be measured in three principal ways:

The topographic elevation of a summit measures the height of the summit above a geodetic sea level. The first table below ranks the 100 highest major summits of the United States by elevation.

The topographic prominence of a summit is a measure of how high the summit rises above its surroundings. The second table below ranks the 50 most prominent summits of the United States.

The topographic isolation (or radius of dominance) of a summit measures how far the summit lies from its nearest point of equal elevation. The third table below ranks the 50 most isolated major summits of the United States.

List of the major 4000-meter summits of Alaska

The following sortable table comprises the 23 mountain peaks of the U.S. State of Alaska with at least 4000 meters (13,123 feet) of topographic elevation and at least 500 meters (1640 feet) of topographic prominence.

Topographic elevation is the vertical distance above the reference geoid, a mathematical model of the Earth's sea level as an equipotential gravitational surface. The topographic prominence of a summit is the elevation difference between that summit and the highest or key col to a higher summit. The topographic isolation of a summit is the minimum great-circle distance to a point of equal elevation.

This article defines a significant summit as a summit with at least 100 meters (328.1 feet) of topographic prominence, and a major summit as a summit with at least 500 meters (1640 feet) of topographic prominence. An ultra-prominent summit is a summit with at least 1500 meters (4921 feet) of topographic prominence. There are 65 ultra-prominent summits in Alaska.

If an elevation or prominence is calculated as a range of values, the arithmetic mean is shown.

List of the ultra-prominent summits of Alaska

The following sortable table comprises the 65 ultra-prominent summits of the U.S. State of Alaska. Each of these peaks has at least 1500 meters (4921 feet) of topographic prominence.

Topographic elevation is the vertical distance above the reference geoid, a mathematical model of the Earth's sea level as an equipotential gravitational surface. The topographic prominence of a summit is the elevation difference between that summit and the highest or key col to a higher summit. The topographic isolation of a summit is the minimum great-circle distance to a point of equal elevation.

This article defines a significant summit as a summit with at least 100 meters (328.1 feet) of topographic prominence, and a major summit as a summit with at least 500 meters (1640 feet) of topographic prominence. An ultra-prominent summit is a summit with at least 1500 meters (4921 feet) of topographic prominence. There are 126 ultra-prominent summits in the United States.

If an elevation or prominence is calculated as a range of values, the arithmetic mean is shown.

Marcus Baker

Marcus Baker (23 September 1849 – 12 December 1903) was an American naturalist, explorer of Alaska, journalist, and newspaper editor.

Mount Baker (disambiguation)

Mount Baker may refer to:

Mount Baker, a volcano located in Washington, United States

Mt. Baker Ski Area located outside of Bellingham, Washington

Mount Baker, Seattle, a neighborhood in Seattle

USS Mount Baker, either of two ships named after this mountain:

USS Mount Baker (AE-4), an ammunition ship of the U.S. Navy, in service from 1940 to 1947 and again from 1951 to 1969.

USNS Mount Baker (T-AE-34), an ammunition ship commissioned in 1972 and currently in service with the Military Sealift Command.

Mount Baker (Waputik Mountains) in the Canadian Rockies

Mount Baker (Ruwenzoris) in the Ruwenzori Range on the border of Uganda and the Congo

Mount Marcus Baker in Alaska

Mount Baker (Link station) in SeaTac metropolitan area, WA

Mount Baker Secondary School, Cranbrook, British Columbia, Canada

Mount Ellen (Utah)

Mount Ellen is a mountain located in Garfield County, Utah. The high point of Mount Ellen's North Summit Ridge is the highest point in the Henry Mountains; it is also the highest point in Garfield County. It can be reached by a short hike from an unpaved road. These mountains were the last to be surveyed by the USGS in the lower 48 states. The mountain can be seen from as far as Mount Peale in the La Sal Mountains of eastern Utah.

Mount Ellen is an ultra prominent peak, meaning that it has more than 1,500 metres (4,921 ft) of topographic prominence, standing out considerably from nearby mountains. It stands in the watershed of the Fremont River, which together with Muddy Creek forms the Dirty Devil River, which drains into the Colorado River, and ultimately into the Gulf of California in Mexico.

The Paiute name for Mount Ellen was Un tar re. It was also referred to as First Mountain. After climbing to the summit in June 1872, Almon Harris Thompson named it for his wife Ellen. Ellen Powell Thompson was also the sister of explorer John Wesley Powell.Over several days beginning on September 10th, 1895 a detachment of the U.S. Army Signal Corps established the world heliograph record from stations atop Mount Ellen, Utah and Mount Uncompahgre, Colorado. The record for visual signalling was established utilizing mirrors 8 inches across and telescopes. The flashing signals communicated over a distance of 183 miles.

Mount Jefferson (Nevada)

Mount Jefferson is the highest mountain in both the Toquima Range and Nye County in Nevada, United States. It is the sixth highest mountain in the state. As the high point of a range which is well separated from other ranges by low basins, Mount Jefferson has a high topographic prominence of 5,861 feet (1,786 m). This makes it the most prominent peak in Nye County and the third most prominent peak in Nevada (after Charleston Peak and Wheeler Peak). For similar reasons, it is also the highest mountain for over 90 miles in all directions. It is located about 50 miles (80 km) northeast of the county seat of Tonopah within the Alta Toquima Wilderness of the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest, near the smaller towns of Carvers and Round Mountain. Three distinct summits are located on a broad area of subalpine tundra: North Summit rises to 11,820 feet (3,603 m), Middle Summit to 11,692 feet (3,564 m), and South Summit to 11,949 feet (3,642 m). During the Pleistocene, alpine glaciers eroded several cirques east of the summit plateau.

Mount Peale

Mount Peale is the highest point in the La Sal Mountains of San Juan County, in the southeastern part of Utah, United States. It is also the highest point in Utah outside the Uinta Mountains. It is located about 20 mi (32 km) southeast of Moab. The summit is the highest point in the Manti-La Sal National Forest and the Mount Peale Research Natural Area. Mount Peale was named for Albert Peale, a mineralogist on the Hayden Survey of 1875.The La Sal Mountains sit on the arid Colorado Plateau, near such famous desert landmarks as Canyonlands National Park and Arches National Park. However, due to their height, the La Sals are heavily forested and usually snow-capped until early summer (there is one snowfield on the north side that usually lasts year round). Mount Peale can be seen on a clear day from the Wasatch Plateau of central Utah, near Orangeville, over 115 miles (190 km) away.

Mount Peale can be accessed from various directions, but is most commonly climbed from the area of La Sal Pass, 10,125 ft (3,086 m), about 3 mi (5 km) to the southwest of the peak. La Sal Pass is accessed from the southeast via a graded gravel road. From the pass the summit is obtained by a short but steep off-trail hike of about 2.5 mi (4.0 km) with about 2,600 ft (800 m) of elevation gain. The route often involves some travel on snow, even in summer.

North Schell Peak

North Schell Peak is the highest mountain in the Schell Creek Range of White Pine County, Nevada, United States. It is the ninth-highest mountain in the state, and also ranks as the fifth-most topographically prominent peak in the state. The summit is 19 miles (31 km) northeast of the community of Ely within the High Schells Wilderness of the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest.

Pilot Peak (Nevada)

Pilot Peak (Shoshoni: Waahkai) is the highest mountain in the Pilot Range in extreme eastern Elko County, Nevada, United States. It is the most topographically prominent peak in Elko County and the fourth-most prominent peak in Nevada. The peak is on public land administered by the Bureau of Land Management and thus has no access restrictions.

Ruby Dome

Ruby Dome is the highest mountain in both the Ruby Mountains and Elko County, in Nevada, United States. It is the twenty-seventh-highest mountain in the state, and also ranks as the thirteenth-most topographically prominent peak in the state. The peak is located about 21 miles (34 km) southeast of the city of Elko within the Ruby Mountains Ranger District of the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest. The mountain rises from a base elevation of about 6,000 feet (1,800 m) to a height of 11,387 feet (3,471 m). It is the highest mountain for over 90 miles in all directions.

Star Peak (Nevada)

Star Peak is both the highest and most topographically prominent mountain in both the Humboldt Range and Pershing County in Nevada, United States. It is the sixth-most topographically prominent peak in Nevada. The peak is on public land administered by the Bureau of Land Management and has no access restrictions.

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