Mount Ephraim

Mount Ephraim (Hebrew: הר אפרים), or alternately Mount of Ephraim, was the historical name for the central mountainous district of Israel once occupied by the Tribe of Ephraim (Joshua 17:15; 19:50; 20:7), extending from Bethel to the plain of Jezreel. In Joshua's time (Joshua 17:18), approximately sometime between the 18th century BCE and the 13th century BCE, these hills were densely wooded. They were intersected by well-watered, fertile valleys, referred to in Jeremiah 50:19.

Notable persons

Joshua was buried at Timnath-heres among the mountains of Ephraim, on the north side of the hill of Gaash (Judges 2:9). This region is also called the "mountains of Israel" (Joshua 11:21) and the "mountains of Samaria" (Jeremiah 31:5, 6: Amos 3:9).

Israel's fourth judge and prophetess Deborah lived in this region. Her home was called "the palm tree of Deborah", and was between Bethel and Ramah in Benjamin (Judges 4:5).

'Then Jeroboam built Shechem in mount Ephraim, and dwelt therein; and went out from thence, and built Penuel. And Jeroboam said in his heart, Now shall the kingdom return to the house of David:(Ephraim was the new king after the pass of the King of Solomon.) [1]

See also

References

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainEaston, Matthew George (1897). "article name needed". Easton's Bible Dictionary (New and revised ed.). T. Nelson and Sons.

Atlantic City Railroad

The Atlantic City Railroad was a Philadelphia and Reading Railway subsidiary that became part of Pennsylvania-Reading Seashore Lines in 1933. At the end of 1925 it operated 161 miles of road on 318 miles of track; that year it reported 43 million ton-miles of revenue freight and 204 million passenger-miles.

Audubon High School

Audubon High School is a comprehensive six-year community public high school that serves students in seventh through twelfth grades from Audubon, in Camden County, New Jersey, United States, operating as the lone secondary school of the Audubon School District.

As of the 2016-17 school year, the school had an enrollment of 856 students and 71.1 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.0:1. There were 167 students (19.5% of enrollment) eligible for free lunch and 54 (6.3% of students) eligible for reduced-cost lunch.Public school students from Mount Ephraim attend the district's high school as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Mount Ephraim Public Schools.

Audubon School District

The Audubon Public School District is a comprehensive community public school district that serves students in pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade from Audubon, in Camden County, New Jersey, United States.

As of the 2014-15 school year, the district and its three schools had an enrollment of 1,381 students and 130.4 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 10.6:1.The district is classified by the New Jersey Department of Education as being in District Factor Group "DE", the fifth-highest of eight groupings. District Factor Groups organize districts statewide to allow comparison by common socioeconomic characteristics of the local districts. From lowest socioeconomic status to highest, the categories are A, B, CD, DE, FG, GH, I and J.Students from Audubon Park attend the district's schools as part of a sending/receiving relationship established after Audubon Park closed its lone school in 1979. For grades 9-12, students from Mount Ephraim attend Audubon High School, as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Mount Ephraim Public Schools.

Dan Baker (PA announcer)

Dan Baker (born September 22, 1946) is an American public address announcer best known for many years as the voice of Veterans Stadium, Lincoln Financial Field, and Citizens Bank Park in Philadelphia.

Born in Philadelphia, Baker grew up in Mount Ephraim, New Jersey and graduated from Audubon High School. He earned his undergraduate degree at Glassboro State College (since renamed as Rowan University) and went on to earn a master's degree at Temple University.Baker has been the public address announcer for the Philadelphia Phillies since 1972 and was the Philadelphia Eagles PA announcer from 1985 to 2014. He has served as a PA voice for five World Series (1980, 1983, 1993, 2008 and 2009), two Major League Baseball All Star Games (1976 and 1996), and three NFC Championship Games (2002, 2003, and 2004).

Though the Phillies and Eagles left Veterans Stadium for new venues (the Eagles to Lincoln Financial Field in 2003 and the Phillies to Citizens Bank Park in 2004), Baker remained the PA announcer for both teams. He also serves as PA announcer for the Army–Navy Game when it is played in Philadelphia as well as Drexel University Dragons men's basketball.

After the 2009 retirement of the New York Yankees' Bob Sheppard, who was also PA announcer for the Eagles' biggest rival, New York Giants, Baker became the longest-tenured PA announcer in Major League Baseball.Between Baker and former Chicago Cubs' public address announcer Pat Pieper, the 2017 MLB season will mark 101 consecutive seasons that one of them has been announcing games. Pieper from 1916–1974 and Baker from 1972–present. The last game that was played without Pieper or Baker announcing games was the 1915 World Series on October 13, 1915.Baker was the radio announcer for Drexel University Dragons men's basketball on WNTP 990 AM from 1997–2012, after which he retired and became the team's public address announcer. Before that, he broadcast Philadelphia BIG 5 Basketball games for 21 years while additionally serving as its executive director from 1981–96. Baker was named to the Big 5 Hall of Fame in 1997 and was inducted into the Philadelphia Sports Hall of Fame in 2012.

Baker co-hosts a radio show on WBCB (AM) 1490 called "Bull Session" with former Philadelphia Phillies slugger Greg Luzinski, for whom the show is named. The show airs at 6:00 pm on Monday nights, and each week they bring in a special guest, usually a current or retired player.Baker reprises his role as the Philadelphia Phillies PA announcer for select Phillies away games at multiple venues that comprise a chain of Philadelphia area sports bars. The events are billed as "Summer Nights with Dan Baker". At these appearances, Baker announces the game over the sports bar's PA system in exactly the same fashion as he would if he was announcing an actual Phillies home game.

On May 7, 2014, the Eagles announced that Baker would no longer serve as their public address announcer, citing that they decided to make a change in the role. Baker will continue to be the public address announcer for the Phillies.

On September 16, 2015, XFINITY Live! announced that Baker would be the in-house public address announcer for Philadelphia Eagles games. Baker's duties are similar to those he had as the public address announcer for the Eagles, which include energizing the crowd with his signature calls.

Ephraim Bluff

Ephraim Bluff is a 425 m ice-free bluff in the south of Breznik Heights, Greenwich Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica. The bluff is linked to Razgrad Peak to the north-northeast and separates the termini of Wulfila Glacier to the northwest and Zheravna Glacier to the east.

The feature was charted and named 'Mount Ephraim' as early as 1820-22 by American sealers who used it as a lead mark for the nearby Yankee Harbour.

Kent and Sussex Hospital

The Kent and Sussex Hospital was a district general hospital located on Mount Ephraim in Royal Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England serving the West Kent and East Sussex areas. It was managed by the Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust until it closed in 2011.

List of United States Supreme Court cases, volume 452

This is a list of all the United States Supreme Court cases from volume 452 of the United States Reports:

Little v. Streater, 452 U.S. 1 (1981)

Lassiter v. Department of Social Servs. of Durham Cty., 452 U.S. 18 (1981)

Schad v. Mount Ephraim, 452 U.S. 61 (1981)

Gulf Oil Co. v. Bernard, 452 U.S. 89 (1981)

Minnick v. California Dept. of Corrections, 452 U.S. 105 (1981)

McDaniel v. Sanchez, 452 U.S. 130 (1981)

Ford Motor Credit Co. v. Cenance, 452 U.S. 155 (1981) (per curiam)

County of Washington v. Gunther, 452 U.S. 161 (1981)

Anderson Bros. Ford v. Valencia, 452 U.S. 205 (1981)

American Express Co. v. Koerner, 452 U.S. 233 (1981)

Rowan Cos. v. United States, 452 U.S. 247 (1981)

Hodel v. Virginia Surface Mining & Reclamation Association, 452 U.S. 264 (1981)

Hodel v. Indiana, 452 U.S. 314 (1981)

Rhodes v. Chapman, 452 U.S. 337 (1981)

National Gerimedical Hospital and Gerontology Center v. Blue Cross of Kansas City, 452 U.S. 378 (1981)

Federated Department Stores, Inc. v. Moitie, 452 U.S. 394 (1981)

Jones v. Helms, 452 U.S. 412 (1981)

United States v. Maine, 452 U.S. 429 (1981)

California v. Arizona, 452 U.S. 431 (1981)

Maryland v. Louisiana, 452 U.S. 456 (1981)

Connecticut Bd. of Pardons v. Dumschat, 452 U.S. 458 (1981)

Howe v. Smith, 452 U.S. 473 (1981)

American Textile Mfrs. Institute, Inc. v. Donovan, 452 U.S. 490 (1981)

Monroe v. Standard Oil Co., 452 U.S. 549 (1981)

United States v. Turkette, 452 U.S. 576 (1981)

Donovan v. Dewey, 452 U.S. 594 (1981)

Plumbers v. Local 334, Plumbers, 452 U.S. 615 (1981)

Heffron v. International Soc. for Krishna Consciousness, Inc., 452 U.S. 640 (1981)

First National Maintenance Corp. v. NLRB, 452 U.S. 666 (1981)

Michigan v. Summers, 452 U.S. 692 (1981)

Kissinger v. Halperin, 452 U.S. 713 (1981) (per curiam)

New York State Liquor Authority v. Bellanca, 452 U.S. 714 (1981) (per curiam)

United States v. Louisiana, 452 U.S. 726 (1981)

Schweiker v. McClure, 452 U.S. 1301 (1981)

Mizmaze

Mizmaze (or Miz-Maze or Miz Maze) is the name given to two of England's eight surviving historic turf mazes, and also to a third, presumably once similar site (at Leigh in Dorset) that is now merely a relic. Of the two which survive, one is at Breamore, in Hampshire; the other is on top of St Catherine's Hill, overlooking the city of Winchester, Hampshire.

A mizmaze forms a pattern unlike conventional mazes and is classed as a labyrinth because the path has no junctions or crossings. The pattern appears more like a very long rope, neatly arranged to fill the area.

Mount Ephraim, New Jersey

Mount Ephraim is a borough in Camden County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 4,676, reflecting an increase of 181 (+4.0%) from the 4,495 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 22 (-0.5%) from the 4,517 counted in the 1990 Census.Mount Ephraim was incorporated as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 23, 1926, from portions of the now-defunct Centre Township. The boroughs of Bellmawr, Runnemede and Lawnside were simultaneously created during the same two-day period. The borough was named for Ephraim Albertson, who owned a tavern in the area in the early 1800s.

Mount Ephraim, Ohio

Mount Ephraim is an unincorporated community in Noble County, Ohio, United States.

Mount Ephraim (Vermont)

Mount Ephraim is a 1,490-foot (450 m) mountain near Springfield, Vermont, U.S. and the highest land mass in the Precision Valley. It features one of several mysterious stone monuments that appear through the area.

Mount Ephraim (disambiguation)

Mount Ephraim can refer to:

Mount Ephraim, the historical name for a district in Israel

Mount Ephraim, Ohio, an unincorporated community in Noble County, Ohio, United States

Mount Ephraim, New Jersey, a borough in Camden County, New Jersey, United States

Mount Ephraim (Vermont), a mountain in Springfield, Vermont, United States

Mount Ephraim Gardens, historic house and gardens, near Faversham, in United Kingdom

Mount Ephraim, Streatham Hill, London, a narrow approach of two streets with gardens on the western flank of the Norwood Ridge.

Mount Ephraim Gardens

Mount Ephraim Gardens is an Edwardian terraced gardens located at Hernhill, near Faversham, in the English county of Kent.

Mount Ephraim Public Schools

The Mount Ephraim Public Schools are a community public school district that serves students in pre-kindergarten through eighth grade from Mount Ephraim, in Camden County, New Jersey, United States.

As of the 2016-17 school year, the district and its two schools had an enrollment of 437 students and 34.6 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.6:1.The district is classified by the New Jersey Department of Education as being in District Factor Group "CD", the sixth-highest of eight groupings. District Factor Groups organize districts statewide to allow comparison by common socioeconomic characteristics of the local districts. From lowest socioeconomic status to highest, the categories are A, B, CD, DE, FG, GH, I and J.For ninth through twelfth grades, public school students attend Audubon High School, in Audubon, as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Audubon School District. As of the 2016-17 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 856 students and 71.1 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.0:1.

New Jersey Route 168

Route 168 is a 10.75-mile (17.30 km) state highway in the southern part of New Jersey in the United States. The route's southern terminus is an interchange with Route 42 and the Atlantic City Expressway in the Turnersville section of Washington Township, Gloucester County. The northern terminus is an intersection with County Route 603 (CR 603) on the border of Camden and Woodlynne in Camden County. At this point, the route continues toward downtown Camden as CR 605. Route 168 follows the Black Horse Pike for most of its length, running through suburban areas in Gloucester Township, Runnemede, Bellmawr, and Mount Ephraim. It intersects many major roads, including the Route 42 freeway in Gloucester Township, Route 41 in Runnemede, the New Jersey Turnpike and Interstate 295 (I-295) in Bellmawr, Route 76C (an access ramp to I-76 and I-676) in Haddon Township, and U.S. Route 130 (US 130) in Camden.

What is now Route 168 runs along the Black Horse Pike, a turnpike established in 1855 that was to run from Camden to Atlantic City. In 1927, Route 42 was designated along this portion of road as part of its route between Camden and McKee City. In the 1940s, a freeway was proposed for Route 42 between Turnersville and the Camden area; construction began on this freeway in the 1950s. After this freeway was entirely completed in 1959, the Route 42 designation was moved to it and the former alignment of Route 42 along the Black Horse Pike north of Turnersville became Route 168.

Ohio State Route 566

State Route 566 (SR 566) is a north–south state highway in eastern Ohio, a U.S. state. Located exclusively in northern Noble County, SR 566 has its southern terminus at SR 147, at a T-intersection 1.25 miles (2.01 km) north of the unincorporated community of Mount Ephraim. Its northern terminus is at another T-intersection, this time with SR 285 approximately 1.25 miles (2.01 km) south of the village of Senecaville.

Roman Catholic Diocese of Camden

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Camden is a Latin Rite Roman Catholic diocese in New Jersey, United States, consisting of over seventy parishes and about 475,000 Catholics in the southern New Jersey counties of Atlantic, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester, and Salem.

The Bishop of Camden presides from the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Camden, although most major ceremonies are held at Saint Agnes Catholic Church in Blackwood. Some liturgies are held at St. Joseph Pro-Cathedral, Camden.

Bishop Dennis J. Sullivan has been bishop of the diocese since 2013.

Tola (biblical figure)

According to the Bible, Tola (Hebrew: תּוֹלָע, Modern: Tola, Tiberian: Tôlāʻ) was one of the Judges of Israel. His career is summarised in Judges 10:1-2. He judged Israel for 23 years after Abimelech died. He lived at Shamir in Mount Ephraim, where he was also buried.

His name means "Crimson worm" or "scarlet stuff." The son of Puah and the grandson of Dodo from the tribe of Issachar, he had the same name as one of the sons of Issachar who migrated to Egypt with Jacob his grandfather in Genesis 46:13.

Of all the biblical judges, the least is written about Tola. None of his deeds are recorded. The entire account from Judges 10:1-2 (KJV) follows:

1And after Abimelech there arose to defend Israel Tola the son of Puah, the son of Dodo, a man of Issachar; and he dwelt in Shamir in mount Ephraim.

2And he judged Israel twenty and three years, and died, and was buried in Shamir.

Zuph

Zuph meaning honeycomb in Hebrew - is the Biblical name of:

A Kohathite Levite, ancestor of Elkanah and Samuel (1 Sam. 1:1); called also Zophai and Ziph.

Land of Zuph (1 Sam. 9:5, 6), a district in which lay Samuel's city, Ramathaim-Zophim. It was probably so named after Zuph (1 Chr. 6:26). Zuph and the city of Ramathaim-Zophim are mentioned in the bible together with Mount Ephraim, suggesting that they shared a similar locality.

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