Mount Elbert

Mount Elbert is the highest summit of the Rocky Mountains of North America and the highest point in the U.S. state of Colorado and the entire Mississippi River drainage basin. The ultra-prominent 14,440-foot (4401.2 m) fourteener is the highest peak in the Sawatch Range and the second-highest summit in the contiguous United States after Mount Whitney. Mount Elbert is located in San Isabel National Forest, 12.1 miles (19.4 km) southwest (bearing 223°) of the City of Leadville in Lake County, Colorado.[1][2][3][4]

The mountain was named in honor of a Colorado statesman, Samuel Hitt Elbert, who was active in the formative period of the state and Governor of the Territory of Colorado from 1873 to 1874. Henry W. Stuckle of the Hayden Survey was the first to record an ascent of the peak, in 1874. The easiest and most popular climbing routes are categorized as Class 1 to 2 or A+ in mountaineering parlance. Mount Elbert is therefore often referred to as the "gentle giant" that tops all others in the Rocky Mountains.

Mount Elbert
Mt. Elbert
Mount Elbert seen from Turquoise Lake
Highest point
Elevation14,440 ft (4401.2 m) [1] NAVD88
Prominence9093 ft (2772 m) [2]
Isolation671 mi (1079 km) [2]
Listing
Coordinates39°07′04″N 106°26′43″W / 39.1177508°N 106.4453584°WCoordinates: 39°07′04″N 106°26′43″W / 39.1177508°N 106.4453584°W[1]
Geography
Mount Elbert is located in Colorado
Mount Elbert
Mount Elbert
LocationHigh point of Lake County and the State of Colorado, U.S.[2]
Parent rangeHighest summit of the
Rocky Mountains,
Southern Rocky Mountains,
Sawatch Range,
and Elbert Massif[2]
Topo mapUSGS 7.5' topographic map
Mount Elbert, Colorado[3]
Climbing
First ascent1874 by Henry W. Stuckle
Easiest routetrail Hike (class 1)

Geography

Mount Elbert is visible to the southwest of Leadville, often snow-capped even in the summer.[5] Many other fourteeners surround Elbert in all directions, and it is very close to central Colorado's Collegiate Peaks. The neighboring Mount Massive, to the north, is the second-highest peak in the Rocky Mountains and the third-highest in the contiguous United States, and La Plata Peak, to the south, is the fifth-highest in the Rockies. The community of Twin Lakes lies at the base of Mount Elbert, Denver is about 130 miles (209 km) to the east, Vail is 50 miles (80 km) to the north, and Aspen is 40 miles (64 km) to the west. Leadville, about 16 miles (26 km) to the northeast, is the nearest large town.[6] Elbert's parent peak is Mount Whitney in California.[7] Including Alaska and Hawaii, Mount Elbert is the fourteenth-highest mountain in the United States.

Weather conditions often change rapidly, and afternoon thunderstorms are common in the summertime; hailstorms and snow are possible year-round. An electrical storm on the mountain's summit was considered remarkable enough to be reported in the July 1894 issue of Science.[8]

Geology

Panoramic view of Mount Elbert in June
Panoramic view of Mount Elbert in June

Mount Elbert is part of the Sawatch Range, an uplift of the Laramide Orogeny which separated from the Mosquito Range to the east around 28 million years ago.[9] The tops of this range were heavily glaciated, leaving behind characteristic summit features and other such clues. For example, the base of Elbert on the eastern side exhibits large igneous and metamorphic rocks deposited when the glaciers receded, which lie on a lateral moraine. Further up the eastern side there is a large cirque with a small tarn.[10] There are also lakes to both the north and south, Turquoise and Twin Lakes respectively; the Twin Lakes are a result of the natural dam of end moraines,[10] and Turquoise Lake was created by the manmade Sugar Loaf Dam.

Mount Elbert is composed largely of quartzite.[11] However, the summit ridge consists of metamorphic basement rock, which is Pre-Cambrian in origin and about 1.7 billion years old.[10] There are various igneous intrusions including pegmatite, as well as bands of gneiss and schist.[10] Unlike mountains of similar altitude elsewhere, Elbert lacks both a permanent snowpack and a prominent north-facing cirque, which can be attributed to its position among other mountains of similar height, causing it to receive relatively small quantities of precipitation.[11]

History

Samuel Elbert
Mount Elbert was named after Samuel Hitt Elbert

Mount Elbert was named by miners in honor of Samuel Hitt Elbert, the governor of the then-Territory of Colorado, because he brokered a treaty in September 1873 with the Ute tribe that opened up more than 3,000,000 acres (12,000 km2) of reservation land to mining and railroad activity.[12] The first recorded ascent of the peak was by H.W. Stuckle in 1874, who was surveying the mountain as part of the Hayden Survey.[13]

Originally measured as 14,433 feet (4,399 m) in height, Mount Elbert's elevation was later adjusted to 14,440 feet (4,400 m) following a re-evaluation of mapped elevations, which sparked protests. The actual change was made in 1988 as a result of the North American Vertical Datum of 1988; it seems the original measurement resulted from the Sea Level Datum of 1929.[6][14][13] A matter of some contention arose after the Great Depression over the heights of Elbert and its neighbor Mount Massive, which differ in elevation by only 12 feet (3.7 m). This led to an ongoing dispute that came to a head with the Mount Massive supporters building large piles of stones on the summit to boost its height, only to have the Mount Elbert proponents demolish them.[15] The effort was ultimately unsuccessful and Mount Elbert has remained the highest peak in Colorado.[6] The first motorized ascent of Elbert occurred in 1949, when a Jeep was driven to the summit, apparently to judge suitability for skiing development.[15]

Flora and fauna

The summit of Mount Elbert is an alpine environment, featuring plants such as Phacelia sericea (sky-pilot), Hymenoxys grandiflora (old-man-of-the-mountain), and Geum rossii (alpine avens).[13] Also noted are Carex atrata var. pullata, Salix desertorum, Platanthera hyperborea, Thalictrum fendleri, Aquilegia canadensis, Chenopodium album, Gentiana detonsa var. hallii, and Bigelovia parryi.[16] Below treeline the mountain is heavily forested, with the lower slopes covered with a mixture of lodgepole pine, spruce, aspen, and fir.[17]

Some of the fauna reported on the climb to the summit include black bears, marmots, mule deer, pikas, and pocket gophers; there are also many species of birds.[18] Elk, grouse, turkey, and bighorn sheep are present in the area during the summer.[17]

Climbing

Mount Elbert North-east ridge August 2010
The north-east ridge

There are three main routes which ascend the mountain, all of which gain over 4,100 feet (1,200 m) of elevation. The standard route ascends the peak from the east, starting from the Colorado Trail just north of Twin Lakes. The 4.6 miles (7.4 km) long North (Main) Elbert Trail begins close to the Elbert Creek Campground, and gains about 4,500 feet (1,400 m).[19][20] The trail is open to equestrians, mountain bikers and hunters during season.[21] An easier, but longer route, the South Elbert Trail, is 5.5 miles (8.9 km) long, climbing 4,600 feet (1,400 m) at a less-punishing gradient than the North Elbert Trail, approaching from the south and then climbing the eastern ridge.[19]

The most difficult of the main routes is the Black Cloud Trail, a Class 2 climb that takes ten to fourteen hours depending on pace, gains 5,300 feet (1,600 m) in elevation, and also involves an ascent of the sub-peak, South Elbert, at 14,134 feet (4,308 m).[22] Even healthy and experienced climbers report great difficulty on this route, and despite the fact that there is a trail, the route is extremely steep, unstable, and rocky in places. The elevation gain is not evenly distributed over the 5.5-mile ascent. There are also routes approaching from the western face, and southwestern ridge, from South Halfmoon Creek Trailhead and Echo Canyon Trailhead respectively.[22]

Although strenuous and requiring physical fitness, none of the conventional routes require specialist mountaineering skills or technical rock climbing. The main dangers of the mountain are those common to all high mountains, particularly altitude sickness. This can affect anyone, even those who are acclimatized. In serious cases, it can lead to high-altitude pulmonary edema and cerebral edema, which can lead to difficulties with breathing, paralysis, and death. Climbers are advised to begin their ascent at or before 6 a.m. and to summit and descend before early afternoon to minimize exposure to possible afternoon thunderstorms while at high altitudes. Although the most conventional form of ascent is by hiking, Anna Elizabeth Dickinson, the orator, ascended the mountain on a mule borrowed from the U.S. government.[23]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c "MOUNT ELBERT". NGS data sheet. U.S. National Geodetic Survey. Retrieved December 30, 2015.
  2. ^ a b c d e "Mount Elbert, Colorado". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved December 30, 2015.
  3. ^ a b "Mount Elbert". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved November 14, 2014.
  4. ^ The elevation of Mount Elbert includes an adjustment of +1.995 m (+6.55 ft) from NGVD 29 to NAVD 88.
  5. ^ Cate Starmer (ed.). Colorado (9 ed.). Fodor's. p. 132. ISBN 978-1-4000-0415-7.
  6. ^ a b c "Mount Elbert". Summitpost Organization. Retrieved 14 May 2013.
  7. ^ Helman 2005.
  8. ^ Vetter 2011, p. 111.
  9. ^ Hopkins & Hopkins 2000, p. 107.
  10. ^ a b c d Hopkins & Hopkins 2000, p. 110.
  11. ^ a b Kelsey 2001, p. 956.
  12. ^ "Samuel Hitt Elbert". Colorado Governor's Index. Retrieved 4 September 2013.
  13. ^ a b c Enright 2009, p. 12.
  14. ^ "No tall tale: State higher than thought". Denverpost. Retrieved 4 September 2013.
  15. ^ a b Dziezynski 2012, p. 153.
  16. ^ Porter & Coulter 1874, pp. 2, 4, 64, 83, 111, 116, 128, 132–.
  17. ^ a b Holmes 1990.
  18. ^ Holmes 1990, p. 189.
  19. ^ a b "Mount Elbert Trails (Fourteener)". US Dept. Agriculture. Retrieved 13 May 2013.
  20. ^ Dziezynski 2012, p. 151.
  21. ^ Gaug 2011, p. 124.
  22. ^ a b Roach 1999, pp. 93–8.
  23. ^ Gallman 2006, p. 129.

Bibliography

External links

Geography of Colorado

The geography of the U.S. State of Colorado is diverse, encompassing both rugged mountainous terrain, vast plains, desert lands, desert canyons, and mesas. In 1861, the United States Congress defined the boundaries of the new Territory of Colorado exclusively by lines of latitude and longitude, stretching from 37°N to 41°N latitude, and from 102°02'48"W to 109°02'48"W longitude (25°W to 32°W from the Washington Meridian). Starting in 1868, official surveys demarcated the boundaries, deviating from the parallels and meridians in several places. Later surveys attempted to correct some of these mistakes but in 1925 the U.S. Supreme Court affirmed that the earlier demarcation was the official boundary. The borders of Colorado are now officially defined by 697 boundary markers connected by straight boundary lines. Colorado, Wyoming, and Utah are the only states that have their borders defined solely by straight boundary lines with no natural features. The southwest corner of Colorado is the Four Corners Monument at 36°59'56"N, 109°2'43"W. This is the only place in the United States where four states meet: Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, and Utah.The summit of Mount Elbert at 14,440 feet (4,401.2 m) elevation in Lake County is the state's highest point and the highest point in the Rocky Mountains of North America. Colorado has approximately 550 mountain peaks that exceed 4000 meters elevation. Colorado is the only U.S. state that lies entirely above 1000 meters elevation. The state's lowest elevation is 3,317 feet (1,011 m) at the point on the eastern boundary of Yuma County where the Arikaree River flows into the state of Kansas.

Grays Peak

Grays Peak is the tenth-highest summit of the Rocky Mountains of North America and the U.S. state of Colorado. The prominent 14,278-foot (4352 m) fourteener is the highest summit of the Front Range and the highest point on the Continental Divide in North America. (There are higher summits, such as Mount Elbert, which are near, but not on, the Divide.) Grays Peak is located in Arapahoe National Forest, 3.9 miles (6.2 km) southeast by east (bearing 122°) of Loveland Pass on the Continental Divide between Clear Creek and Summit counties. The peak is the highest point in both counties.Grays Peak is one of 53 fourteeners (mountains of over 14,000 feet (4,300 m) in elevation) in Colorado. Botanist Charles C. Parry made the first recorded ascent of the summit in 1861 and named the peak in honor of his botanist colleague Asa Gray. Gray did not see (and climb) the peak until 1872, eleven years later. Grays Peak is commonly mentioned in conjunction with adjacent Torreys Peak.

La Plata Peak

La Plata Peak is the fifth-highest summit of the Rocky Mountains of North America and the U.S. state of Colorado. The prominent 14,343-foot (4,372 m) fourteener is located in the Collegiate Peaks Wilderness of San Isabel National Forest, 22.7 miles (36.5 km) northwest by west (bearing 308°) of the Town of Buena Vista in Chaffee County, Colorado, United States."La Plata" is Spanish for "The Silver", a reference to the many silver deposits in the area. The nearby ghost towns of Winfield and Hamilton were prominent silver mining towns in the early part of the 20th century. A Hayden Survey team first climbed the peak on July 26, 1873.The elevation of 14,361 feet marked on the USGS Mount Elbert Quadrangle is incorrect, and should read 14,336 feet (in the NGVD 29 vertical datum).

Lake County, Colorado

Lake County is one of the 64 counties in the U.S. state of Colorado. As of the 2010 census, the population was 7,310. The county seat and the only municipality in the county is Leadville. The highest natural point in Colorado and the entire Rocky Mountains is the summit of Mount Elbert in Lake County at 14,440 feet (4401.2 meters) elevation.

List of Colorado fourteeners

In the mountaineering parlance of the Western United States, a fourteener is a mountain peak with an elevation of at least 14,000 feet (4270 meters). This is a complete list of the 53 fourteeners in the U.S. State of Colorado with at least 300 feet (91.44 meters) of topographic prominence. See the main fourteener article, which has a list of all of the fourteeners in the United States, for some information about how such lists are determined and caveats about elevation and ranking accuracy.

The summit of a mountain or hill may be measured in three principal ways:

The topographic elevation of a summit measures the height of the summit above a geodetic sea level.

The topographic prominence of a summit is a measure of how high the summit rises above its surroundings.

The topographic isolation (or radius of dominance) of a summit measures how far the summit lies from its nearest point of equal elevation.

List of Ultras of the Rocky Mountains

The following sortable table comprises the 31 ultra-prominent summits of the Rocky Mountains of North America. Each of these peaks has at least 1500 meters (4921 feet) of topographic prominence.The summit of a mountain or hill may be measured in three principal ways:

The topographic elevation of a summit measures the height of the summit above a geodetic sea level.

The topographic prominence of a summit is a measure of how high the summit rises above its surroundings.

The topographic isolation (or radius of dominance) of a summit measures how far the summit lies from its nearest point of equal elevation.

List of extreme summits of the Rocky Mountains

This article comprises four sortable tables of mountain summits of the Rocky Mountains of North America that are the higher than any other point north or south of their latitude or east or west their longitude in those mountains.

The summit of a mountain or hill may be measured in three principal ways:

The topographic elevation of a summit measures the height of the summit above a geodetic sea level.

The topographic prominence of a summit is a measure of how high the summit rises above its surroundings.

The topographic isolation (or radius of dominance) of a summit measures how far the summit lies from its nearest point of equal elevation.

List of mountain peaks of Colorado

This article comprises three sortable tables of major mountain peaks of the U.S. State of Colorado.

The summit of a mountain or hill may be measured in three principal ways:

The topographic elevation of a summit measures the height of the summit above a geodetic sea level. The first table below ranks the 55 highest major summits of Colorado by elevation.

The topographic prominence of a summit is a measure of how high the summit rises above its surroundings. The second table below ranks the 50 most prominent summits of Colorado.

The topographic isolation (or radius of dominance) of a summit measures how far the summit lies from its nearest point of equal elevation. The third table below ranks the 50 most isolated major summits of Colorado.

List of mountain ranges of Colorado

The following table lists the major mountain ranges of the U.S. State of Colorado. All of these ranges can be considered subranges of the Rocky Mountains.

As given in the table, topographic elevation is the vertical distance above the reference geoid, a mathematical model of the Earth's sea level as an equipotential gravitational surface. The topographic prominence of a summit is the elevation difference between that summit and the highest or key col to a higher summit. The topographic isolation of a summit is the minimum great-circle distance to a point of equal elevation.

All elevations in this article include an elevation adjustment from the National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929 (NGVD 29) to the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD 88). For further information, please see this United States National Geodetic Survey note. If an elevation or prominence is calculated as a range of values, the arithmetic mean is shown.

List of the major 100-kilometer summits of the Rocky Mountains

The following sortable table lists the 19 peaks of the Rocky Mountains of North America with at least 100 kilometers (62.14 miles) of topographic isolation and at least 500 meters (1640 feet) of topographic prominence.

The summit of a mountain or hill may be measured in three principal ways:

The topographic elevation of a summit measures the height of the summit above a geodetic sea level.

The topographic prominence of a summit is a measure of how high the summit rises above its surroundings.

The topographic isolation (or radius of dominance) of a summit measures how far the summit lies from its nearest point of equal elevation.

List of the most prominent summits of Colorado

The following sortable table comprises the 100 most topographically prominent mountain peaks of the U.S. State of Colorado.

Topographic elevation is the vertical distance above the reference geoid, a mathematical model of the Earth's sea level as an equipotential gravitational surface. The topographic prominence of a summit is the elevation difference between that summit and the highest or key col to a higher summit. The topographic isolation of a summit is the minimum great-circle distance to a point of equal elevation.

This article defines a significant summit as a summit with at least 100 meters (328.1 feet) of topographic prominence, and a major summit as a summit with at least 500 meters (1640 feet) of topographic prominence. An ultra-prominent summit is a summit with at least 1500 meters (4921 feet) of topographic prominence. There are 126 ultra-prominent summits in the United States.

All elevations include an adjustment from the National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929 (NGVD 29) to the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD 88). For further information, please see this United States National Geodetic Survey note.

If an elevation or prominence is calculated as a range of values, the arithmetic mean is shown.

Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Site

Mount Elbert Methane Hydrate Site (or Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Test Well, Mount Elbert test well)

Mount Massive

Mount Massive is the second-highest summit of the Rocky Mountains of North America and the U.S. state of Colorado. The prominent 14,428-foot (4,398 m) fourteener of the Sawatch Range is located in the Mount Massive Wilderness of San Isabel National Forest, 10.6 miles (17.1 km) west-southwest (bearing 247°) of the City of Leadville in Lake County, Colorado, United States. Mount Massive edges out the third-highest summit of the Rockies, Mount Harvard, by 7 feet (2.1 m), but falls short of Mount Elbert by 12 feet (3.7 m). It ranks as the third-highest peak in the contiguous United States after Mount Whitney and Mount Elbert.

Mountain states

The Mountain States (also known as the Mountain West and the Interior West) form one of the nine geographic divisions of the United States that are officially recognized by the United States Census Bureau. It is a subregion of the Western United States.

The Mountain States generally are considered to include: Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming. The words "Mountain States" generally refer to the US States which encompass the US Rocky Mountains. These are oriented north-south through portions of the states of Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, and New Mexico. Arizona and Nevada, as well as other parts of Utah and New Mexico, have other smaller mountain ranges and scattered mountains located in them as well. Sometimes, the Trans-Pecos area of West Texas is considered part of the region. The land area of the eight states together is some 855,767 square miles (2,216,426 square kilometers).

Pyramid Peak (Colorado)

Pyramid Peak is a fourteen thousand foot mountain in the U.S. state of Colorado. It is the 47th highest mountain peak in Colorado, and 78th highest peak in the United States. It is located in the Elk Mountains in southeastern Pitkin County, approximately 12 miles (19 km) southwest of Aspen. The summit somewhat resembles a ragged square pyramid and is visible from the Roaring Fork River valley north of Aspen along the canyon of Maroon Creek.

Like many of the peaks in the Elks, Pyramid Peak is quite steep, especially compared to more gentle fourteeners such as Mount Elbert. For example, the peak's summit rises 4,000 feet (1,200 m) above Crater Lake to the northwest in only 1.2 miles (1.9 km), and 4,400 feet (1,300 m) above East Maroon Creek to the east of the peak in the same horizontal distance.

Samuel Hitt Elbert

Samuel Hitt Elbert (April 3, 1833 – November 27, 1899) served as Governor of the Territory of Colorado (1873–1874) and Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the State of Colorado (1879–1883).

Samuel Hitt Elbert was born in Logan County, Ohio. At age seven, he moved with his family to the Territory of Iowa, where he attended public school and studied agriculture. He graduated from Ohio Wesleyan University with high honors in 1854 and moved to the Territory of Nebraska to practice law. In Nebraska, Elbert became active in the newly formed Republican Party. Elbert was appointed Secretary of the Territory of Colorado and served from 1862 until 1867. Secretary Elbert organized the Republican Party in the Colorado Territory. Samuel Elbert married Josephine Evans, the daughter of his mentor, Territorial Governor John Evans.

U.S. President Ulysses S. Grant appointed Samuel Elbert as the sixth Governor of the Territory of Colorado on April 4, 1873. President Grant became the first U.S. President to visit the Rocky Mountain region that summer. The President stayed at Governor Elbert's home, visited Central City, and met with a group of Ute leaders. Governor Elbert served until June 19, 1874, when his predecessor, Edward Moody McCook, was reappointed Governor. Samuel Elbert was appointed to the Supreme Court of the State of Colorado in 1877 where he served until 1889. Elbert served as the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court from 1879 to 1883. Samuel Elbert died on November 27, 1899.

Elbert County, Colorado; Elbert, Colorado; and Mount Elbert, the highest peak in the Rocky Mountains, are named in honor of Samuel Hitt Elbert. Grateful miners named Mount Elbert after the governor because he brokered a treaty with the Ute tribe, which opened up more than 3,000,000 acres (12,000 km2) of Indian reservation to mining and railroad activity.

San Isabel National Forest

San Isabel National Forest is located in central Colorado. The forest contains 19 of the state's 53 fourteeners, peaks over 14,000 feet (4,267 m) high, including Mount Elbert, the highest point in Colorado.

It is one of eleven national forests in the state of Colorado and contains the Sawatch Range, the Collegiate Peaks, and Sangre de Cristo Range. It has a total area of 1,120,233 acres (1,750.36 sq mi, or 4,533.42 km²) spread out over parts of eleven counties in central Colorado. In descending order of land area it is located in Chaffee, Custer, Lake, Huerfano, Fremont, Pueblo, Saguache, Las Animas, Park, Costilla, and Summit counties.San Isabel National Forest is co-managed by the Forest Service together with Pike National Forest, Cimarron National Grassland, and Comanche National Grassland from offices in Pueblo. There are local ranger district offices located in Cañon City, Leadville, and Salida.

Sawatch Range

The Sawatch Range is a high and extensive mountain range in central Colorado which includes eight of the twenty highest peaks in the Rocky Mountains, including Mount Elbert, at 14,440 feet (4,401 m) elevation, the highest peak in the Rockies.

The range is oriented along a northwest-southeast axis, extending approximately 80 miles (130 km) from 39°37′36″N 106°32′13″W in the north to 38°5′51″N 106°3′48″W in the south. The range contains 15 peaks topping 14,000 feet (4,267 m), also known as 14ers. The range forms a portion of the Continental Divide, and its eastern flanks are drained by the headwaters of the Arkansas River. The western side of the range feeds the headwaters of the Roaring Fork River, the Eagle River, and the Gunnison River, tributaries of the Colorado River.

The Sawatch mountains in general are high, massive, and relatively gentle in contour. While some peaks are rugged enough to require technical climbing, most can be climbed by a simple, yet arduous hike. Notable summits include Mount Elbert, Mount Massive, La Plata Peak, Mount of the Holy Cross, and the Collegiate Peaks (Mounts Columbia, Harvard, Princeton, Yale, Belford, and Oxford).

State Highway 82 traverses the range at Independence Pass (Colorado). It is also traversed by Cottonwood Pass, which connects the town of Buena Vista with Gunnison County. Both Independence Pass and Cottonwood Pass are over 12,000 feet (3,658 m), making them 2 of the highest passes in Colorado and are typically open only from late spring to mid autumn. Hagerman Pass is another pass to the north, connecting the Arkansas Headwaters near Leadville with the upper valley of the Fryingpan River. Hagerman pass is traversable with four-wheel drive vehicles and on foot during summer and early autumn months. The range contains numerous hiking trails within the San Isabel National Forest and White River National Forest.

Twin Lakes, Lake County, Colorado

Twin Lakes is a census-designated place located in Lake County, Colorado, United States near the base of Mount Elbert. The population as of the 2010 Census was 171. Twin Lakes has the ZIP Code 81251.Lake County, one of the original 17 counties created by the Colorado legislature in 1861, was named for Twin Lakes. As originally defined, Lake County included a large portion of western Colorado to the south and west of its present boundaries.

The Twin Lakes District has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since 1974.

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