Moose Krause

Edward Walter "Moose" Krause (born Edward Walter Kriaučiūnas; Lithuanian: Edvardas Valteris Kriaučiūnas; February 2, 1913 – December 11, 1992) was an American football, basketball, and baseball player, track athlete, coach, and college athletics administrator. He lettered in four sports at the University of Notre Dame, where he was a three-time consensus All-American in basketball (1932–1934). Krause served as the head basketball coach at Saint Mary's College in Winona, Minnesota, now Saint Mary's University of Minnesota, from 1934 to 1939, at the College of the Holy Cross from 1939 to 1942, and at Notre Dame from 1943 to 1944 and 1946 to 1951, compiling a career college basketball record of 155–114. He was Notre Dame's athletic director from 1949 to 1981. Krause was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 1976 and the College Basketball Hall of Fame in 2006.

Moose Krause
Moose Krause
Biographical details
BornFebruary 2, 1913
Chicago, Illinois
DiedDecember 11, 1992 (aged 79)
South Bend, Indiana
Playing career
Football
1931–1933Notre Dame
Basketball
1931–1934Notre Dame
Position(s)Tackle (football)
Center (basketball)
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1934–1938Saint Mary's (MN)
1939–1941Holy Cross (line)
1942–1943Notre Dame (line)
1946–1947Notre Dame (line)
Basketball
1934–1939Saint Mary's (MN)
1939–1942Holy Cross
1943–1944Notre Dame
1946–1951Notre Dame
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1934–1939Saint Mary's (MN)
1948–1949Notre Dame (assistant AD)
1949–1981Notre Dame
Head coaching record
Overall155–114 (basketball)
Accomplishments and honors
Awards
Football All-American (1932)
Basketball All-American (19321934)
Walter Camp Man of the Year (1976)
Basketball Hall of Fame
Inducted in 1976 (profile)
College Basketball Hall of Fame
Inducted in 2006

Early life and playing career

Born Edward Walter Kriaučiūnas in Chicago to Lithuanian immigrant parents, Krause grew up in the Town of Lake section or, as it was once known as, Back of the Yards. His brother, Feliksas Kriaučiūnas, was the captain of Lithuania national basketball team in 1937. His surname was shortened to Krause by his high school football coach, who could not pronounce Kriaučiūnas (Lithuanian pronunciation: [krɪ.ɐutɕɪˈuːnɐs]).

At Notre Dame, Krause competed in track, baseball, football and basketball,[1] becoming the first Notre Dame player to make the halls of fame of both basketball and football. In basketball, he was a three-time Consensus All-American (1932–1934).[2] Krause played football for the Fighting Irish under Heartley Anderson. He graduated cum laude from Notre Dame in 1934 with a journalism degree.

Coaching career

Krause's coaching career included a five-year stint as head coach in all sports at Saint Mary's College in Winona, Minnesota, now Saint Mary's University of Minnesota; an assistant football coach at the College of the Holy Cross and the University of Notre Dame for ten years; and head basketball coach at the University of Notre Dame in 1943 and again from 1946 to 1951, when he compiled a record of 98–48 (.671).[3] As acting head football coach at Notre Dame, filling in for an ailing Frank Leahy, Krause was 3–0.

Military service

Krause served in the United States Marines during World War II including a 14-month stretch as an air combat intelligence officer in the South Pacific.[4]

Administrative career

Krause became the assistant athletic director at Notre Dame in 1948. In March 1949, he was named athletic director, succeeding Frank Leahy, who stepped down from the role to focus on his post as head football coach.[4]

References

  1. ^ http://www.irishlegends.com/pages/reflections/reflections10.html
  2. ^ http://hoopedia.nba.com/index.php?title=Ed_%22Moose%22_Krause
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on February 18, 2015. Retrieved July 30, 2014.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  4. ^ a b "'Moose' Krause Named Athletic Director at ND". St. Petersburg Times. Associated Press. March 23, 1949. Retrieved November 14, 2010.

Further reading

  • Kelly, Jason (2002). Mr. Notre Dame: The Life and Legend of Edward Moose Krause. Lanham, Maryland: Diamond Communications. ISBN 1-888698-40-3.

External links

1932 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans

The consensus 1932 College Basketball All-American team, as determined by aggregating the results of three major All-American teams. To earn "consensus" status, a player must win honors from a majority of the following teams: the Helms Athletic Foundation, Converse and College Humor Magazine.

1933 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans

The consensus 1933 College Basketball All-American team, as determined by aggregating the results of three major All-American teams. To earn "consensus" status, a player must win honors from a majority of the following teams: the Helms Athletic Foundation, Converse and College Humor Magazine.

1934 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans

The consensus 1934 College Basketball All-American team, as determined by aggregating the results of three major All-American teams. To earn "consensus" status, a player must win honors from a majority of the following teams: the Helms Athletic Foundation, Converse and The Literary Digest.

1992 in basketball

The following are the basketball events of the year 1992 throughout the world.

Clem Crowe

Clem F. Crowe (October 18, 1903 – April 13, 1983) was an American gridiron football and basketball player and coach. He served as the head football coach at Saint Vincent College (1926–1931), Xavier University (1936–1943), and the University of Iowa (1945), compiling a career college football record of 71–66–5. Crowe was also the head basketball coach at Saint Vincent College (1928–1932), Xavier (1933–1943), and the University of Notre Dame (1944–1945), tallying a career college basketball mark of 152–115. He later coached professional football for the Buffalo Bills and Baltimore Colts of the All-America Football Conference (AAFC), and the Ottawa Rough Riders and BC Lions of the Canadian Football League (CFL).

Digger Phelps

Richard Frederick "Digger" Phelps (born July 4, 1941) is an American former college basketball coach, most notably of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish from 1971 to 1991. For 20 years, from 1993 to 2014, he served as an analyst on ESPN. He got the nickname "Digger" from his father, who was a mortician in Beacon, New York.

Elmer Ripley

Elmer H. Ripley (July 21, 1891 – April 29, 1982) was an American basketball coach. He coached college basketball at seven different schools and for several professional teams.

Feliksas Kriaučiūnas

Feliksas Kriaučiūnas (Americanized his name as Phil Krause; born August 18, 1911 – October 28, 1977) was a Lithuanian American basketball player and coach. He won two gold medals with Lithuania national basketball team and silver medal with Lithuania women's national basketball team.

Frank E. Hering

Frank Earl Hering (April 30, 1874 – July 11, 1943) was an American football player and coach of football, basketball, and baseball. He served as the head football coach at the University of Notre Dame from 1896 to 1898, compiling a record of 12–6–1. Hering was also the first basketball coach at Notre Dame, coaching one season in 1897–1898, and helmed the school's baseball team for three seasons from 1897 to 1899.

Hering was born in Sunbury, Pennsylvania and played quarterback for the Chicago Maroons in 1893 and 1894. His first head coaching job was with the Bucknell Bison in 1895. The next year, he arrived at Notre Dame to play quarterback for the football team; but by 1898 he had taken on the additional responsibility of directing the entire athletic department, including coaching the football and baseball teams, and introducing basketball to the university. He earned the title of "Father of Notre Dame Football" for his success in expanding the football program from an intramural activity to a full-fledged intercollegiate sport. Hering officially dedicated the new Notre Dame Stadium in 1930.

Hering is also recognized by the Fraternal Order of Eagles as the "Father of Mother's Day" for his work in promoting the establishment of a national holiday, having given public speeches supporting the idea as early as 1904. Hering was a member of Phi Gamma Delta Fraternity.While a member of the Notre Dame faculty in his later years, Hering was known for his outreach programs in South Bend, Indiana, including the establishment of "Hering House"—a civic center for the African-American community.

Frank Leahy

Francis William Leahy (August 27, 1908 – June 21, 1973) was an American football player, coach, college athletics administrator, and professional sports executive. He served as the head football coach at Boston College from 1939 to 1940 and at the University of Notre Dame from 1941 to 1943 and again from 1946 to 1953, compiling a career college football record of 107–13–9. His winning percentage of .864 is the second best in NCAA Division I football history, trailing only that of fellow Notre Dame Fighting Irish coach, Knute Rockne, for whom Leahy played from 1928 to 1930. Leahy played on two Notre Dame teams that won national championships, in 1929 and 1930, and coached four more, in 1943, 1946, 1947, and 1949. Leahy was also the athletic director at Notre Dame from 1947 until 1949 when he passed the role to the Fighting Irish basketball coach, Moose Krause, so that he could focus on football coaching. Leahy served as the general manager for the Los Angeles Chargers of the American Football League (AFL) during their inaugural season in 1960. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1970.

George Keogan

George E. Keogan (March 8, 1890 – February 17, 1943) was an American football, basketball, and baseball coach, most known for coaching basketball at the University of Notre Dame from 1923 to 1943. Keogan never had a losing season in his 20 years at Notre Dame.

The Minnesota Lake, Minnesota native attended University of Minnesota from 1909 to 1913. He began coaching high school varsities after his freshman year in college, guiding first Lockport High School (1910–1911) followed by Riverside High School (1911–1912). Meanwhile, he was also coaching several college basketball teams: Charles City College in Iowa (1909–1910), Superior State Teachers College in Wisconsin (1912–1914), Saint Louis University (1914–15) and the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, Minnesota (1917–1918). During World War I he served at Great Lakes Naval Training Station. After briefly coaching Allegheny College in Meadville, Pennsylvania (1919–1920) and Valparaiso, Keogan arrived at University of Notre Dame. He served as head basketball and baseball coach, as well as assistant to the legendary football coach Knute Rockne. Keogan compiled a 327–96–1 at Notre Dame.

Keogan died on February 17, 1943 of a heart attack at his home in South Bend, Indiana. After his death, Moose Krause took over his job as Notre Dame's head basketball coach. Keogan was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 1961 and the National Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame in 2006.

Hugh Devore

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Jesse Harper

Jesse Clair Harper (December 10, 1883 – July 31, 1961) was an American football and baseball player, coach, and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at Alma College (1906–1907), Wabash College (1909–1912), and the University of Notre Dame (1913–1917), compiling a career college football record of 57–17–7. Harper was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1971.

John Dee (basketball)

John Francis Dee, Jr. (September 12, 1923 – April 24, 1999) was head basketball coach at the University of Alabama from 1953 to 1956 and the University of Notre Dame from 1964 to 1971.

John Jordan (basketball)

John Jordan (1910-1991) was an American basketball player and coach, best known for coaching the University of Notre Dame's men's basketball team from 1951 to 1964.

Jordan played basketball at Notre Dame in the 1930s and was a teammate of George Ireland, Moose Krause, and Ray Meyer. He was the captain of the Fighting Irish in 1935. After college, he took a coaching job at Mount Carmel High School in Chicago, and remained there until 1949. He spent the 1950–51 basketball season as coach at Loyola University Chicago, then took the reins at Notre Dame the following season. While at Notre Dame, Jordan recorded a 199-131 record and guided his players to five appearances in the NCAA Tournament.

He attended Archbishop Quigley Preparatory Seminary in Chicago, graduating in 1929.

After Jordan's coaching career ended, he worked with the Chicago Park District. He died in Oak Forest, Illinois at the age of 81 in 1991.

John MacLeod (basketball)

John Matthew MacLeod (born October 3, 1937) is an American former basketball coach in the NCAA and the National Basketball Association.

Mike Brey

Michael Paul Brey (born March 22, 1959) is an American college basketball coach. He has been the men's head coach at the University of Notre Dame since July 14, 2000.

Mirko Jurkovic

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Walter Halas

Walter Henry Halas (January 15, 1892 – December 20, 1959) was an American baseball player and coach of American football, basketball, and baseball. He played college baseball at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign from 1914 to 1916 as a pitcher for the Fighting Illini. Halas later pitched in minor league baseball for the Davenport Blue Sox, Moline Plowboys, and Rock Island Islanders of the Illinois–Indiana–Iowa League. In 1924, he pitched a no-hitter for the Hanover Raiders of the Blue Ridge League.

Halas died in Chicago on December 20, 1959 at the age of 67. He was the brother of George Halas, longtime coach and owner of the National Football League's Chicago Bears.

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