Montpellier

Montpellier (French: [mɔ̃pəlje, -pɛ-] (listen);[2][3] Occitan: Montpelhièr [mumpeˈʎɛ]) is a city near the south coast of France on the Mediterranean Sea. It is the capital of the Hérault department. It is located in the Occitanie region. In 2016, 607,896 people lived in the urban area and 281,613 in the city itself. Nearly one third of the population are students from three universities and from three higher education institutions that are outside the university framework in the city.[4][5]

Montpellier
Montpellier Place de la Comédie
Cathédrale Saint-Pierre de Montpellier (2403792242)
Bassin Jacques Coeur Montpellier (3)
Nouvelle Mairie de Montpellier
Clockwise from top: The Place de la Comédie, Port Marianne's lake, Lez's bank with the Montpellier Town Hall, and the Cathedral of Saint Peter.
Coat of arms of Montpellier

Coat of arms
Location of Montpellier
Montpellier is located in France
Montpellier
Montpellier
Montpellier is located in Occitanie
Montpellier
Montpellier
Coordinates: 43°36′43″N 3°52′38″E / 43.6119°N 3.8772°ECoordinates: 43°36′43″N 3°52′38″E / 43.6119°N 3.8772°E
CountryFrance
RegionOccitanie
DepartmentHérault
ArrondissementMontpellier
CantonMontpellier-1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and Montpellier – Castelnau-le-Lez
IntercommunalityMontpellier Méditerranée Métropole
Government
 • Mayor (2014–2020) Philippe Saurel
Area
1
56.88 km2 (21.96 sq mi)
Population
 (2016-01-01)[1]
286,098
 • Rank8th in France
 • Density5,000/km2 (13,000/sq mi)
 • Metro
607,896
Demonym(s)Montpelliérains
Time zoneUTC+01:00 (CET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+02:00 (CEST)
INSEE/Postal code
34172 /34000, 34070, 34080, 34090
Elevation7–121 m (23–397 ft)
(avg. 27 m or 89 ft)
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries.

Status

Montpellier is the third-largest French city on the Mediterranean coast after Marseille and Nice. It is the 7th-largest city of France, and is also the fastest-growing city in the country over the past 25 years.

History

Braun Montpellier UBHD
Montpellier in the 16th century

Medieval period

In the Early Middle Ages, the nearby episcopal town of Maguelone was the major settlement in the area, but raids by pirates encouraged settlement a little further inland. Montpellier, first mentioned in a document of 985, was founded under a local feudal dynasty, the Guilhem, who combined two hamlets and built a castle and walls around the united settlement. The name is from medieval Latin mons pislerius, referring to the woad used for dying locally. The two surviving towers of the city walls, the Tour des Pins and the Tour de la Babotte, were built later, around the year 1200. Montpellier came to prominence in the 12th century—as a trading centre, with trading links across the Mediterranean world, and a rich Jewish cultural life that flourished within traditions of tolerance of Muslims, Jews and Cathars—and later of its Protestants. William VIII of Montpellier gave freedom for all to teach medicine in Montpellier in 1180. The city's faculties of law and medicine were established in 1220 by Cardinal Conrad of Urach, legate of Pope Honorius III; the medicine faculty has, over the centuries, been one of the major centres for the teaching of medicine in Europe. This era marked the high point of Montpellier's prominence. The city became a possession of the Kings of Aragon in 1204 by the marriage of Peter II of Aragon with Marie of Montpellier, who was given the city and its dependencies as part of her dowry.

Montpellier gained a charter in 1204 when Peter and Marie confirmed the city's traditional freedoms and granted the city the right to choose twelve governing consuls annually. Under the Kings of Aragon, Montpellier became a very important city, a major economic centre and the primary centre for the spice trade in the Kingdom of France. It was the second or third most important city of France at that time, with some 40,000 inhabitants before the Black Death. Montpellier remained a possession of the crown of Aragon until it passed to James III of Majorca, who sold the city to the French king Philip VI in 1349, to raise funds for his ongoing struggle with Peter IV of Aragon. In the 14th century, Pope Urban VIII gave Montpellier a new monastery dedicated to Saint Peter, noteworthy for the very unusual porch of its chapel, supported by two high, somewhat rocket-like towers. With its importance steadily increasing, the city finally gained a bishop, who moved from Maguelone in 1536, and the huge monastery chapel became a cathedral. In 1432, Jacques Cœur established himself in the city and it became an important economic centre, until 1481 when Marseilles overshadowed it in this role.

After the Reformation

At the time of the Reformation in the 16th century, many of the inhabitants of Montpellier became Protestants (or Huguenots as they were known in France) and the city became a stronghold of Protestant resistance to the Catholic French crown. In 1622, King Louis XIII besieged the city which surrendered after a two months siege (Siege of Montpellier), afterwards building the Citadel of Montpellier to secure it. Louis XIV made Montpellier capital of Bas Languedoc, and the town started to embellish itself, by building the Promenade du Peyrou, the Esplanade and a large number of houses in the historic centre. After the French Revolution, the city became the capital of the much smaller Hérault.

Modern history

Montpellier(France)1.JL
Rue Foch with its typical 19th-century architecture.

During the 19th century the city thrived on the wine culture that it was able to produce due to the abundance of sun throughout the year. The wine consumption in France allowed Montpellier's citizens to become very wealthy until in the 1890's a fungal disease had spread amongst the vineyards and the people were no longer able to grow the grapes needed for wine.[6] After this the city had grown because it welcomed immigrants from Algeria and other parts of northern Africa after Algeria's independence from France. In the 21st century Montpellier is between France's number 7th and 8th largest city. The city had another influx in population more recently, largely due to the student population, who make up about one-third of Montpellier's population. The school of medicine kickstarted the city's thriving university culture,[7] though many other universities have been well established there. The coastal city also has such developments as the Corum and the Antigone that have attracted an increasing number of students.

Lords of Montpellier

Geography

Montpellier SPOT 1166
Montpellier seen from Spot satellite

The city is situated on hilly ground 10 km (6 mi) inland from the Mediterranean coast, on the River Lez. The name of the city, which was originally Monspessulanus, is said to have stood for mont pelé (the naked hill, because the vegetation was poor), or le mont de la colline (the mount of the hill)

Montpellier is located 170 km (106 mi) from Marseille, 242 km (150 mi) from Toulouse, and 748 km (465 mi) from Paris.

Montpellier's highest point is the Place du Peyrou, at an altitude of 57 m (187 ft). The city is built on two hills, Montpellier and Montpelliéret, thus some of its streets have great differences of altitude. Some of its streets are also very narrow and old, which gives it a more intimate feel.

Climate

Montpellier has a Mediterranean climate (Köppen Csa), with mild, damp winters, and hot, rather dry summers. The monthly mean ranges from 7.1 °C (44.8 °F) in January to 23.4 °C (74.1 °F) in July. Precipitation is around 660 millimetres (26.0 in), and is greatest in fall and winter, but not absent in summer, either. Extreme temperatures have ranged from −17.8 °C (−0.04 °F) recorded on February 5, 1963 and up to 43.5 °C (110.3 °F) on June 28, 2019.

Neighbourhoods

Since 2001, Montpellier has been divided into seven official neighbourhoods, themselves divided into sub-neighbourhoods. Each of them possesses a neighbourhood council.

  • Montpellier-centre : historical centre (Écusson), Comédie, Gares, Faubourg Boutonnet, Saint-Charles, Faubourg Saint-Jaume, Peyrou, Les Arceaux, Figuerolles, Faubourg du Courreau, Gambetta, Clémenceau, Méditerranée, boulevard de Strasbourg, Le Triangle, Polygone, Antigone, Nouveau-Monde, Parc à Ballons, Les Aubes, Les Beaux-Arts, Saint-Lazare.
  • Croix-d'Argent : avenue de Toulouse, Croix d'Argent, Mas Drevon, Tastavin, Lemasson, Garosud, Mas de Bagnères, Mas Nouguier, les Sabines, Lepic, Pas du Loup, Estanove, les Bouisses, Val-de-Crozes, Bagatelle.
  • Les Cévennes : Les Cévennes, Alco, Le Petit Bard, Pergola, Saint-Clément, Clémentville, Las Rebès, La Chamberte, La Martelle, Montpellier-Village, Les Grisettes, Les Grèzes.
  • Mosson : La Mosson, Celleneuve, La Paillade, les Hauts-de-Massane, Le Grand-Mail, Les Tritons.
  • Hôpitaux-Facultés : Malbosc, Saint-Priest, Euromédecine, Zolad, Plan des 4 Seigneurs, Hôpitaux, IUT, Père Soulas, Universités, Vert-Bois, Hauts de Boutonnet, Aiguelongue, Justice, Parc zoologique de Lunaret, Agropolis.
  • Port-Marianne : La Pompignane, Richter, Millénaire, Jacques Cœur, Consuls de Mer, Grammont, Odysseum, Montaubérou, La Méjanelle, Cambacérès.
  • Prés d'Arènes : Les Prés d'Arènes, Avenue de Palavas, La Rauze, Tournezy, Saint-Martin, Les Aiguerelles, Pont-Trinquat, Cité Mion.

Population

Historical population
YearPop.±%
178929,500—    
180633,264+12.8%
182035,123+5.6%
187655,258+57.3%
190175,950+37.4%
191180,230+5.6%
192181,548+1.6%
193690,787+11.3%
194693,102+2.5%
195497,501+4.7%
1962118,864+21.9%
1968161,910+36.2%
1975191,354+18.2%
1982197,231+3.1%
1990207,996+5.5%
1999225,392+8.4%
2010257,351+14.2%

The whole metropolitan area had a population of 510,400 in 2006. And in a study made by INSEE from 2007 to 2012 Montpellier saw the strongest population growth of France's main communes (+1,1 %), ahead of Paris and Lyon. In 2011, the estimated population of the metropolitan area was 561,326.[12]

For most of its history, and even today, Montpellier is known for its significant Spanish population, heritage and influence. Montpellier also houses important Moroccan, Algerian, and Italian communities.

Heraldry

Arms of Montpellier
The arms of Montpellier are blazoned:
Azure, a madonna proper, vested gules and azure, sitting on an antique throne Or, holding a Baby Jesus proper vested azure, in chief the uncial letters A and M, and in base on an inescutcheon argent a torteau (gules).

The virgin is "Notre Dame des Tables", named for the money changing tables at the Basilica of Notre-Dame des Tables. The A and M are for "Ave Maria". The inescutcheon is the arms of the Lords of Montpellier (Guilhem).

Sights

Tour de la Babote Montpellier
Tour de la Babote.
PanoMontpellierAquaduct
Saint Clément Aqueduct.
Fabre Museum
Fabre Museum in Montpellier
  • The main focus point of the city is the Place de la Comédie, with the Opéra Comédie built in 1888.
  • The Musée Fabre.
  • In the historic centre, a significant number of hôtels particuliers (i.e. mansions) can be found. The majority of the buildings of the historic centre of Montpellier (called the Écusson because its shape is roughly that of an escutcheon) have medieval roots and were modified between the 16th and the 18th centuries. Some buildings, along Rue Foch and the Place de la Comédie, were built in the 19th century.
  • The Rue du Bras de Fer (Iron Arm Street) is very typical of the medieval Montpellier.
  • The mikve, ritual Jewish bath, dates back to the 12th century and is one of very few in Europe.
  • The Jardin des plantes de Montpellier—oldest botanical garden in France, founded in 1593
  • The La Serre Amazonienne, a tropical rain forest greenhouse
  • The 14th-century Saint Pierre Cathedral
  • The Porte du Peyrou, a triumphal arch built at the end of the 17th century, and the Place Royal du Peyrou built in the 17th century, are the highest point of the Ecusson.
  • The Tour des Pins, the only remaining of 25 towers of the city medieval walls, built around 1200.
  • The Tour de la Babotte, a medieval tower which was modified in the 18th century to house an observatory.
  • The Saint Clément Aqueduct, built in the 18th century.
  • The Antigone District and other housing projects have been designed by the architect Ricardo Bofill from Catalonia, Spain
  • A number of châteaux, so-called follies, built by wealthy merchants surround the city
  • Nearly 80 private mansions were built in the city from the 17th to 19th century, and some of their interior courtyards are open

Education

History

The University of Montpellier is one of the oldest in the world, founded in 1160, and having been granted a charter in 1220 by Cardinal Conrad von Urach and confirmed by Pope Nicholas IV in a papal bull of 1289. It was suppressed during the French Revolution but was re-established in 1896.

It is not known exactly at what date the schools of literature were founded which developed into the Montpellier faculty of arts; it may be that they were a direct continuation of the Gallo-Roman schools. The school of law was founded by Placentinus, a doctor from Bologna University, who came to Montpellier in 1160, taught there during two different periods, and died there in 1192. The school of medicine was founded perhaps by a graduate of the Muslim Spain medical schools; it is certain that, as early as 1137, there were excellent physicians at Montpellier. The statutes given in 1220 by Cardinal Conrad, legate of Honorius III, which were completed in 1240 by Pierre de Conques, placed this school under the direction of the Bishop of Maguelonne. Pope Nicholas IV issued a Bull in 1289, combining all the schools into a university, which was placed under the direction of the bishop, but which in fact enjoyed a large measure of autonomy.

Theology was at first taught in the convents, in which St. Anthony of Padua, Raymond Lullus, and the Dominican Bernard de la Treille lectured. Two letters of King John prove that a faculty of theology existed at Montpellier independently of the convents, in January 1350. By a Bull of 17 December 1421, Martin V granted canonical institution to this faculty and united it closely with the faculty of law. In the 16th century the faculty of theology disappeared for a time, when Calvinism, in the reign of Henry II of France, held complete possession of the city. It resumed its functions after Louis XIII had reestablished the royal power at Montpellier in 1622; but the rivalries of Dominicans and Jesuits interfered seriously with the prosperity of the faculty, which disappeared at the Revolution. The faculty numbered among its illustrious pupils of law Petrarch, who spent four years at Montpellier, and among its lecturers Guillaume de Nogaret, chancellor to Philip the Fair, Guillaume de Grimoard, afterwards pope under the name of Urban V, and Pedro de Luna, antipope as Benedict XIII. But after the 15th century this faculty fell into decay, as did also the faculty of arts, although for a time, under Henry IV of France, the latter faculty had among its lecturers Casaubon.

The Montpellier school of medicine owed its success to the ruling of the Guilhems, lords of the town, by which any licensed physician might lecture there; there was no fixed limit to the number of teachers, lectures were multiplied, and there was a great wealth of teaching. Rabelais took his medical degrees at Montpellier. It was in this school that the biological theory of vitalism, elaborated by Barthez (1734–1806), had its origin. The French Revolution did not interrupt the existence of the faculty of medicine.

The faculties of science and of letters were re-established in 1810; that of law in 1880. It was on the occasion of the sixth centenary of the university, celebrated in 1889, that the Government of France announced its intention—which has since been realized—of reorganizing the provincial universities in France.

Universities

University of Montpellier 1 and University of Montpellier 2 reunified in January 2015 to form the University of Montpellier. Paul Valéry University Montpellier, remains a separate entity[13]

Grandes Ecoles

Science
Business

Transport

Montpellier Tramway1
Line 1 of the tramway network, at the Corum stop.

Montpellier is served by railway, including TGV highspeed trains. Montpellier's main railway station is Saint-Roch. There are plans to construct a high-speed railway linking Nîmes and Montpellier with the LGV Méditerranée.[14]

Montpellier Tramway Map
Montpellier tramway map

The Montpellier – Méditerranée Airport is located in the area of Fréjorgues, in the town of Mauguio, southeast of Montpellier.

The Transports de l'agglomération de Montpellier (TaM) manages the city's public transportation, including its 56-kilometre (35 mi) tramway network consisting of four lines and several parking facilities.[15] Line 1 runs from Mosson in the west to Odysseum in the east. Line 2 runs from Jacou in the northeast to St. Jean-de-Vedas in the southwest. Line 3 and Line 4 opened in April 2012. Line 3, which is 22.4-kilometre (13.9 mi) long, links Juvignac and Perols with a branch to Lattes and serves 32 stations. Line 4 circles the centre and serves as a connector line between the various arms of tram system. They intersect at Gare St. Roch station, Rives du Lez and Corum.

The TaM also manages the large bike sharing scheme Vélomagg', started in June 2007, comprising 1200 bicycles and 50 stations.[16][17]

Sport

Montpellier was the finish of Stage 11 and the departure of Stage 12 in the 2007 Tour de France. It was also the finish of Stage 11 and the departure of Stage 12 in the 2016 edition. The city is home to a variety of professional sports teams:

Montpellier was one of the hosts of the FIBA EuroBasket 2015.

The city is home to the Open Sud de France tennis tournament since 2010, and will host the XXXI World Rhythmic Gymnastics Championship.

The main athletics stadium is the Philippidès Stadium, which is owned by the University of Montpellier.

Culture

The city is a centre for cultural events as there are many students. Montpellier has two large concert venues: Le Zenith Sud (7.000 seats) and L'Arena (14.000 seats). Le Corum cultural and conference centre contains three auditoriums.

  • The Festival de Radio France et Montpellier is a summer festival of opera and other music held in Montpellier. The festival concentrates on classical music and jazz with about 150 events, including opera, concerts, films, and talks. Most of these events are free and are held in the historic courtyards of the city or in the modern concert halls of Le Corum near historical city center.
  • The annual Cinemed, the International Mediterranean Film Festival Montpellier, held in the fall, is the second largest French film festival after the Cannes Film Festival. Held since 1979, it offers screenings of over 200 long and short films, documentaries, animated films, trailers, and a special program of student films.[19] Other events include panel discussions, exhibitions, and gatherings. Venues include Le Corum and cinema halls.

International relations

Montpellier sistercities
Sign on the Esplanade Charles de Gaulle, showing Montpellier's sister cities

Twin towns – Sister cities

Montpellier is twinned with:

Notable people

Montpellier was the birthplace of:

Other famous inhabitants include:

Other locations named after Montpellier

"Montpellier" is used as the name of other towns and streets in as many as four continents.[25] Many places in England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland carry the name Montpellier. Often they are in resort locations claiming some of the healthy attributes for which the French city was renowned in earlier centuries. The variant spelling "Montpelier" is common, and is of quite early provenance. Brewer uses that spelling. The first example was the early 19th-century suburb of Montpelier in Brighton.[26]

The capital of the American state of Vermont was named Montpelier because of the high regard in which the Americans held the French[27] who had aided their Revolutionary War against the British. Several other American cities are also named Montpelier.

Places named Montpelliers/Montpeliers are also found in Australia, Canada, South Africa, and the Caribbean.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Populations légales 2016". INSEE. Retrieved 25 April 2019.
  2. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2017-04-17. Retrieved 2016-06-02.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  3. ^ Wells, John C. (2008), Longman Pronunciation Dictionary (3rd ed.), Longman, ISBN 9781405881180
  4. ^ "Montpellier Tourist Information and Montpellier Tourism". Montpellier Information and Tourism. Retrieved 5 June 2010.
  5. ^ "Universities in Montpellier and study in Montpellier – International Student Regional Guide". Retrieved 29 January 2015.
  6. ^ "Montpellier History Facts and Timeline: Montpellier, Languedoc-Roussillon, France". www.world-guides.com. Retrieved 2018-10-05.
  7. ^ {{Cite web|url=https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2017/mar/13/montpellier-spotlight-development-mania-france-fastest-growing-city%7Ctitle=Montpellier in the spotlight: development mania in France's fastest-growing city|last=Hoad|first=Phil|date=2017-03-13|website=the Guardian|language=en|access-date=2018-10-05}
  8. ^ "Données climatiques de la station de Montpellier" (in French). Meteo France. Retrieved January 7, 2016.
  9. ^ "Climat Languedoc-Roussillon" (in French). Meteo France. Retrieved January 7, 2016.
  10. ^ "Normes et records 1961–1990: Montpellier – Fréjorgues (34) – altitude 3m" (in French). Infoclimat. Retrieved January 7, 2016.
  11. ^ "Tableau d'observations pour Montpellier (34) ( 5 m )" (in French). meteociel. Retrieved June 28, 2019.
  12. ^ insee (2011-01-01). "Montpellier". Insee.fr. Retrieved 2015-01-01.
  13. ^ Cougnenc, Rémy. "L'université de Montpellier à l'épreuve de la fusion - Journal La Marseillaise". Lamarseillaise.fr. Retrieved 7 September 2018.
  14. ^ "Railway Gazette: Southern LGV projects make progress". Railwaygazette.com. Retrieved 14 February 2011.
  15. ^ "Vivre > Transport > Tramway" [Living > Transport > Tramway]. Montpellier-agglo.com (in French). Retrieved 2014-12-26.
  16. ^ Midi Libre Archived 2009-06-13 at the Wayback Machine (a major daily newspaper in the South of France): "In 2008, 76,000 stations, used 800,000 times, have been registered in Montpellier. A success, and little vandalism compared to the Velib in Paris."
  17. ^ Tous à Vélo Archived 2015-09-12 at the Wayback Machine AFP 19 October 2007: "Paris, Orléans and Montpellier receive the 'Bicycle Trophy 2007' for their achievement in Bike Sharing programs".
  18. ^ [1]
  19. ^ "Cinemed: Montpellier International Festival of Mediterranean Film - Montpellier Tourist Office". Montpellier-france.com. Retrieved 7 September 2018.
  20. ^ "Sister Cities of Louisville, Inc". Retrieved 5 June 2017.
  21. ^ "Stadt Heidelberg". City of Heidelberg website. 5 June 2017.
  22. ^ a b c d e f g h "Montpellier celebrates international dimension with its 10 twin cities". The Provence Herald. 27 September 2012. Archived from the original on 2017-08-30.
  23. ^ "Barcelona internacional – Ciutats agermanades" (in Spanish). Ajuntament de Barcelona. Archived from the original on 5 August 2009. Retrieved 13 July 2009.
  24. ^ France3 and AFP (January 31, 2015). "Le dessinateur montpelliérain Guy Delisle va passer du cocon familial à la Tchétchénie". France3. Retrieved May 14, 2015.
  25. ^ "All the Montpelliers". 2005.
  26. ^ "Montpelier & Clifton Hill Conservation Area Character Statement" (PDF). Brighton & Hove City Council (Design & Conservation Department). 20 October 2005. p. 1. Archived (PDF) from the original on 19 August 2014. Retrieved 31 July 2013.
  27. ^ Swift, Esther Munroe (1977). Vermont Place Names: Footprints of History. Houghton Mifflin. pp. 451–454. ISBN 0-8289-0291-7.

Sources

  • INSEE
  • Lewis, Archibald (1971). The Guillems of Montpellier: A Sociological Appraisal.

Further reading

External links

Andy Delort

Andy Delort (born 9 October 1991) is an Algerian professional footballer who plays as a striker for Ligue 1 club Montpellier and the Algeria national team.

He is a former France U20s international, and has also represented the beach soccer team. For the 2013–14 Ligue 2 season, Delort was named in the Team of the Year and nominated for Player of the Year.

Hérault

Hérault (French: [eʁo]; Occitan: Erau [eˈɾaw]) is a department in Southern France named after the Hérault River. A part of the Occitanie region, it had a population of 1,132,481 in 2016.

James I of Aragon

James I the Conqueror (Catalan: Jaume el Conqueridor; 2 February 1208 – 27 July 1276) was King of Aragon, Count of Barcelona, and Lord of Montpellier from 1213 to 1276; King of Majorca from 1231 to 1276; and Valencia from 1238 to 1276. His long reign—the longest of any Iberian monarch—saw the expansion of the House of Aragon and House of Barcelona in three directions: Languedoc to the north, the Balearic Islands to the southeast, and Valencia to the south. By a treaty with Louis IX of France, he wrested the County of Barcelona from nominal French suzerainty and integrated it into his crown. He renounced northward expansion and taking back the once Catalan territories in Occitania and vassal counties loyal to the County of Barcelona, lands that were lost by his father Peter II of Aragon in the Battle of Muret during the Albigensian Crusade and annexed by the Kingdom of France, and then decided to turn south. His great part in the Reconquista was similar in Mediterranean Spain to that of his contemporary Ferdinand III of Castile in Andalusia. One of the main reasons for this formal renunciation of most of the once Catalan territories in Languedoc and Occitania and any expansion into them is the fact that he was raised by the Knights Templar crusaders, who had defeated his father fighting for the Pope alongside the French, so it was effectively forbidden for him to try to maintain the traditional influence of the Count of Barcelona that previously existed in Occitania and Languedoc.

As a legislator and organiser, he occupies a high place among the European kings. James compiled the Llibre del Consolat de Mar, which governed maritime trade and helped establish Aragonese supremacy in the western Mediterranean. He was an important figure in the development of the Catalan language, sponsoring Catalan literature and writing a quasi-autobiographical chronicle of his reign: the Llibre dels fets.

Montpellier-de-Médillan

Montpellier-de-Médillan is a commune in the Charente-Maritime department in southwestern France.

Montpellier 2 University

Montpellier 2 University (Université Montpellier 2) was a French university in the académie of Montpellier. It was one of the three universities formed in 1970 from the original University of Montpellier. Its main campus neighbors the Montpellier 3 University's main campus, and for this reason the nearest tramway station is named "Universities of Sciences and Literature" rather than "University of Sciences". In January 2015, Montpellier 1 University and Montpellier 2 University merged into the Montpellier University (Université de Montpellier).

Montpellier HSC

Montpellier Hérault Sport Club (French pronunciation: ​[mɔ̃pəlje eʁo spɔʁ klœb]; commonly referred to as Montpellier HSC or simply Montpellier) is a French association football club based in the city of Montpellier. The original club was founded in 1919, while the current incarnation was founded through a merger in 1974. Montpellier currently plays in Ligue 1, the top level of French football and plays its home matches at the Stade de la Mosson, located within the city. The first team is managed by Michel Der Zakarian and captained by defender Hilton.

Montpellier was founded under the name Stade Olympique Montpelliérain (SOM) and played under the name for most of its existence. In 1989, after playing under various names, the club changed its name to its current form. Montpellier is one of the founding members of the first division of French football. Along with Marseille, Rennes, Sochaux and Nice, Montpellier is one of only a few clubs to have played in the inaugural 1932–33 season and is still playing in the first division. The club won Ligue 1 for the first time in the 2011–12 season. Montpellier's other honours to date include winning the Coupe de France in 1929 and 1990, and the UEFA Intertoto Cup in 1999.

Montpellier is owned by Laurent Nicollin, the son of the late Louis Nicollin, a French entrepreneur, who had been owner since 1974. The club have produced several famous players in its history, most notably Laurent Blanc, who has served as manager of the France national team. Blanc is also the club's all-time leading goalscorer. Eric Cantona, Roger Milla, Carlos Valderrama and Olivier Giroud are other players who have played in Montpellier's colours. In 2001, Montpellier introduced a women's team.

Montpellier HSC (Women)

Montpellier Hérault Sport Club Féminines (French pronunciation: ​[mɔ̃pɛˈlyeɪ eɪˈroʊ]; commonly referred to as simply Montpellier) is a French women's football club based in Villeneuve-lès-Maguelone, a commune in the arrondissement of Montpellier. The club was founded in 1990. Montpellier play in the Division 1 Féminine having finished in 4th place in the 2009–10 season. The club is managed Sarah M'Barek and was captained by goalkeeper and French women's international Céline Deville before she departed for club rivals Lyon in July 2011.

Montpellier hosts its home matches at the Stade Joseph-Blanc, a 1,000-capacity stadium that is situated in Villeneuve-lès-Maguelone. The club also hosts matches at the Stade de Grammont in Montpellier, where the male section is based.

Montpellier Handball

Montpellier Handball, formerly named Montpellier Agglomération Handball, is a handball club from Montpellier, France. Montpellier is the only French club to ever have won the EHF Champions League.

Montpellier Hérault Rugby

Montpellier Hérault Rugby (French pronunciation: ​[mɔ̃.pə.lje eʁo ʁʊɡbi klʊb]) (Occitan: Montpelhièr Erau Rugbi Club) is a French professional rugby union club, based in Montpellier, Occitanie and named after the Hérault river. The club competes in the top level of the French league system, the Top 14. They originally played at Stade Sabathé (capacity 5,000) but moved to the Stade Yves-du-Manoir, later known as Altrad Stadium, and since renamed the GGL Stadium, in 2007. They wear white and blue.

Montpellier–Méditerranée Airport

Montpellier–Méditerranée Airport or Aéroport de Montpellier–Méditerranée (IATA: MPL, ICAO: LFMT), also known as Fréjorgues Airport, is an airport in southern France. It is located 7 km (4 nautical miles) east-southeast of Montpellier in Mauguio, in the Hérault department of the Languedoc-Roussillon region in France. The airport opened in 1946, 8 years after the first flight to the area.The airport carries the 10th largest number of passengers in France (over 1.18 million in 2010). A campus of the École nationale de l'aviation civile (French civil aviation university) is also located at the airport.

Murviel-lès-Montpellier

Murviel-lès-Montpellier is a commune in the Hérault department in the Occitanie region in southern France.

The Oppidum d’Altimurium, also known as the Oppidum Murviel-les-Montpellier, is an ancient hill-town (or oppidum) located near the village.

Agénor Azéma de Montgravier, pioneering archaeologist, carried out excavations in the mid 19th century at the Roman ruins of Murviel-lès-Montpellier on behalf of the Commission de la Carte des Gaules. An archaeological museum with some artifacts from the site is located in Murviel-les-Montpellier.

Olivier Giroud

Olivier Jonathan Giroud (French pronunciation: ​[ɔlivje ʒiʁu]; born 30 September 1986) is a French professional footballer who plays as a forward for Premier League club Chelsea and the France national team.

He began his career at Grenoble in Ligue 2 before joining Tours in 2008. In his second season at Tours, he was the division's top scorer with 21 goals, earning him a move to top-flight side Montpellier. Giroud was again the top scorer with 21 goals in the 2011–12 season, giving the club their first ever Ligue 1 title before moving to Arsenal. Giroud won the FA Cup with Arsenal in 2014, 2015 and 2017, and totalled 105 goals in 253 games for the club. In January 2018, he transferred to Chelsea where, in his first full season, he became the first player from the club to score 10+ goals in a single European campaign.

Giroud made his full international debut for France in 2011. He has since become the nation's third-highest goalscorer with 35 goals in 89 caps, and was part of the teams which reached the quarter-finals at UEFA Euro 2012 and the 2014 FIFA World Cup, the final of UEFA Euro 2016 in which he received the Bronze Boot as joint second-highest goalscorer, and won the 2018 FIFA World Cup.

Paul Valéry University, Montpellier III

Paul Valéry University of Montpellier (French: Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier III), also known as or UPVM (official acronym) or Montpellier III (UM3, until early 2015), is a French university in the Academy of Montpellier. It is one of the three successor universities to the University of Montpellier, specialising in the arts, languages and social sciences.

The university is a member of the Coimbra Group, an association of long-established European multidisciplinary universities of high international standard.

Saint Roch

Saint Roch or Rocco (lived c. 1348 – 15/16 August 1376/79 (traditionally c. 1295 – 16 August 1327)) was a Catholic saint, a confessor whose death is commemorated on 16 August and 9 September in Italy; he is specially invoked against the plague. He may also be called Rock in English, and has the designation of St Rollox in Glasgow, Scotland, said to be a corruption of St Roch's Loch, which referred to a small loch once near a chapel dedicated to St. Roch in 1506.He is a patron saint of dogs, falsely accused people, bachelors, and several other things. He is the patron saint of Dolo (near Venice) and Parma.

He's also the patron of Casamassima, Cisterna di Latina and Palagiano, Italy.Saint Roch is known as "San Roque" in Spanish, including in many now-English-speaking areas, such as the Philippines.

Sofia Jakobsson

Eva Sofia Jakobsson (born 23 April 1990) is a Swedish footballer who plays for Montpellier HSC of the French Division 1 Féminine. She made her debut for the Sweden women's national football team in 2011 and won her 100th cap in 2019. Jakobsson represented her country in the 2013 edition of the UEFA Women's Championship, as well as at the 2011, 2015 and 2019 FIFA Women's World Cups. She also played at the 2012 and 2016 Olympic Football Tournaments.

Stade de la Mosson

Stade de la Mosson (French pronunciation: ​[stad də la mɔˈsɔ̃]) is a football stadium in Montpellier, France. It is the home of Montpellier HSC (Ligue 1) and has a capacity of 32,900. Formerly a 16,000-seater stadium, it was entirely rebuilt in 1998 to host 6 games of the 1998 FIFA World Cup. It was also used as a venue for group stage matches in the 2007 Rugby World Cup and is one of nine venues being used in the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup.

SupAgro

Montpellier SupAgro is a French public institution devoted to higher education and research in Agriculture, Food and Environment. Montpellier SupAgro is widely open to international issues and partnerships, with specific focus and expertise on southern and Mediterranean areas. It trains students in most of the agronomy and life sciences fields. It is part of Agropolis Fondation. The Montpellier INRA research center is also located on la Gaillarde campus.

University of Montpellier

The University of Montpellier (French: Université de Montpellier) is a French public research university in Montpellier in south-east of France. Established in 1289, the University of Montpellier is one of the oldest universities in the world.

The university was split into three universities during 45 years (the University of Montpellier 1, the University of Montpellier 2 and the Paul Valéry University Montpellier 3) between 1970 and 2015 when it was subsequently reunified by the merger of the former two, with the latter, now named Paul Valéry University Montpellier, remaining a separate entity.

Younès Belhanda

Younès Belhanda (Arabic: يونس بلهندة‎; born 25 February 1990) is a French-born Moroccan professional footballer who plays for Galatasaray and the Morocco national team.

Climate data for Montpellier (1981–2010 averages)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 21.2
(70.2)
22.5
(72.5)
27.4
(81.3)
30.4
(86.7)
35.1
(95.2)
43.5
(110.3)
37.5
(99.5)
36.8
(98.2)
36.3
(97.3)
31.8
(89.2)
27.1
(80.8)
22.0
(71.6)
43.5
(110.3)
Average high °C (°F) 11.6
(52.9)
12.8
(55.0)
15.9
(60.6)
18.2
(64.8)
22.0
(71.6)
26.4
(79.5)
29.3
(84.7)
28.9
(84.0)
25.0
(77.0)
20.5
(68.9)
15.3
(59.5)
12.2
(54.0)
19.9
(67.8)
Daily mean °C (°F) 7.2
(45.0)
8.1
(46.6)
10.9
(51.6)
13.5
(56.3)
17.3
(63.1)
21.2
(70.2)
24.1
(75.4)
23.7
(74.7)
20.0
(68.0)
16.2
(61.2)
11.1
(52.0)
8.0
(46.4)
15.1
(59.2)
Average low °C (°F) 2.8
(37.0)
3.3
(37.9)
5.9
(42.6)
8.7
(47.7)
12.5
(54.5)
16.0
(60.8)
18.9
(66.0)
18.5
(65.3)
15.0
(59.0)
11.9
(53.4)
6.8
(44.2)
3.7
(38.7)
10.4
(50.7)
Record low °C (°F) −15
(5)
−17.8
(0.0)
−9.6
(14.7)
−1.7
(28.9)
0.6
(33.1)
5.4
(41.7)
8.4
(47.1)
8.2
(46.8)
3.8
(38.8)
−0.7
(30.7)
−5
(23)
−12.4
(9.7)
−17.8
(0.0)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 55.6
(2.19)
51.8
(2.04)
34.3
(1.35)
55.5
(2.19)
42.7
(1.68)
27.8
(1.09)
16.4
(0.65)
34.4
(1.35)
80.3
(3.16)
96.8
(3.81)
66.8
(2.63)
66.7
(2.63)
629.1
(24.77)
Average precipitation days 5.5 4.4 4.7 5.7 4.9 3.6 2.4 3.6 4.6 6.8 6.1 5.6 57.8
Average snowy days 0.6 0.7 0.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.7 2.4
Average relative humidity (%) 75 73 68 68 70 66 63 66 72 77 75 76 70.8
Mean monthly sunshine hours 142.9 168.1 220.9 227.0 263.9 312.4 339.7 298.0 241.5 168.6 148.8 136.5 2,668.2
Source #1: Météo France[8][9]
Source #2: Infoclimat.fr (humidity and snowy days, 1961–1990) and meteociel.fr [10][11]
Destinations from Montpellier
Communes of the Hérault department of France
Cities in France by population
1,000,000+
500,000+
200,000+
100,000+

Languages

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