Monday Night Baseball

Monday Night Baseball is a live game telecast of Major League Baseball that airs most Monday nights during the regular season on ESPN. The official name of the game is Monday Night Baseball presented by USAA. The game starts at 7 p.m. ET, following SportsCenter, and usually lasts around three hours leading up to an hour-long Baseball Tonight. The program sometimes airs on ESPN2 rather than ESPN, often due to NBA playoff coverage in April and May, and preseason Monday Night Football coverage in August.

Unlike ESPN's Sunday Night Baseball, Monday Night Baseball is not exclusive, but unlike Wednesday Night Baseball, Monday Night Baseball since 2007 co-exists with the local markets' carriers and is not always subject to blackout; ESPN can show teams up to three times a year in local markets alongside the local broadcasts.

Monday Night Baseball
StarringKarl Ravech
Dave Flemming
Eduardo Perez
Tim Kurkjian
Country of originUnited States
No. of seasons17th Season
Production
Running time3 hours (approximate)
Release
Original networkNBC (1967-1975)
ABC (1976-1988)
ESPN (1992-present)
Original releaseApril 13, 1992 –
Present
Chronology
Related showsSunday Night Baseball
Wednesday Night Baseball
External links
Website

Current

Features

Several things changed to Monday Night Baseball in the eight year television contract that ESPN signed with Major League Baseball on September 14, 2005. Unlike Sunday Night Baseball, the game is non-exclusive, meaning it will co-exist with the teams' local carriers. However, Monday Night Baseball will be allowed to co-exist with local carriers up to three times per club, per year. Beyond that, telecasts will be blacked out in the participating teams' markets (Baseball Tonight is shown in its entirety, beginning at 10:00, with the rest of the nation joining after the game).

Beginning in 2007, there was expected to be an afternoon "batting practice" program generally from the site of the Monday Night Baseball game (similar to the pre-game shows for ESPN's NFL coverage). That program was scheduled to debut on April 9, 2007 at 4 p.m. Eastern time, before the New York Yankees-Minnesota Twins game. However, no batting practice show appeared for reasons that were not explained. Later, ESPN announced that it would also scale back its on-site presence for NFL games.

Because ESPN airs Monday Night Football games, beginning with the pre-season games in mid-August, Monday Night Baseball games either move to ESPN2 or, since 2009, ESPN will broadcast a Wednesday doubleheader with the regularly scheduled Wednesday Night Baseball. On some occasions ESPN will have two scheduled games aired simultaneously, with the one game airing on ESPN and the second on ESPN2. Both telecasts are branded with the Wednesday Night Baseball name, but Dave O'Brien, Rick Sutcliffe and Aaron Boone still call one of the two games.

In the past, the Monday night team would broadcast on Friday night during the NFL season instead of irony for the Wednesday night doubleheader format.

Commentators

A complete list of broadcasters, with their period of tenure on the show (beginning years of each season shown).

ESPN

Current

Former

Gwynn was not available to cover early season games due to the fact that he was also the head baseball coach at San Diego State University.

Controversy

On May 10, 2006 after a long day of drinking and golfing with comedian Bill Murray, MNB analyst Rick Sutcliffe attended a night game between the San Diego Padres and Milwaukee Brewers in San Diego. He was invited to the booth with 4SD broadcasters Mark Grant and Matt Vasgersian where he began a rambling and incoherent interview by saying, "It ain't that busy, it ain't that busy." He then rambled on about off-the-wall subjects such as George Clooney and his daughter's "mission." After he asked Matt Vasgersian what he was still doing in San Diego, his microphone was finally cut off.

As a result, he apologized and ESPN suspended Sutcliffe for one game the next week.[1]

Past history (1967-1988)

The NBC years (1967-1975)

Monday Night Baseball was born on October 19, 1966 when NBC signed a three-year contract to televise the game. Under the deal, NBC paid roughly $6 million per year for the 25 Games of the Week, $6.1 million for the 1967 World Series and 1967 All-Star Game, and $6.5 million for the 1968 World Series and 1968 All-Star Game. This brought the total value of the contract (which included three Monday night telecasts each season) up to $30.6 million.

From 19721975 NBC[2] televised Monday games under a contract worth $72 million. In 1973, NBC extended the Monday night telecasts to 15 straight (with a local blackout). September 1, 1975 saw NBC's last Monday Night Baseball game, in which the Montréal Expos beat the Philadelphia Phillies 6-5.

Curt Gowdy called the Monday night games with Tony Kubek from 1972 to 1974, the pair being joined in 1973 and 1974 by various guest commentators from both in and out of the baseball world. Jim Simpson and Maury Wills called the secondary backup games. Joe Garagiola hosted NBC's pregame show, The Baseball World of Joe Garagiola, and teamed with Gowdy to call the games in 1975.

The ABC years (1976-1988)

ABC would pick up the television rights for Monday Night Baseball[3] games in the following year. Just like with Monday Night Football, ABC brought in the concept of the three-man-booth (originally composed of Bob Prince, Bob Uecker, and Warner Wolf as the primary crew) to their baseball telecasts.

Ratings were typically poor for ABC's Monday night games, and by 1986, ABC only televised 13 Monday Night Baseball games. This was a fairly sharp contrast to the 18 games to that were scheduled in 1978. The Sporting News suggested that ABC paid Major League Baseball to not make them televise the regular season, opining that the network only wanted the sport for October anyway. For most of its time on ABC, the Monday night games were held on "dead travel days" when few games were scheduled. The team owners liked that arrangement, as the ABC games didn't compete against their stadium box offices and local telecasts. The network, on the other hand, found the arrangement far more complicated; ABC often had only one or two games to pick from for each telecast from a schedule designed by Major League Baseball. While trying to give all of the teams national exposure, ABC ended up with a surplus of games involving games between either small-market teams and/or teams with losing records.

In 1989 (the final year of ABC's contract with Major League Baseball), ABC moved the baseball telecasts to Thursday nights in hopes of getting a leg up against NBC's Cosby Show. The network also aired some late-season games on Sunday afternoons.

The FX cable channel aired Monday night games in 1997. The series returned in 2002 as ESPN (which, like ABC by that point, was owned by The Walt Disney Company) created a package under its deal for national cable rights.

ABC's MNB announcers

See also

References

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ "NBC begins "Monday Night Baseball" broadcasts". NBC Sports History Page.
  3. ^ Shea, Stuart. Calling the Game: Baseball Broadcasting from 1920 to the Present. SABR, Inc. p. 358.

External links

1979 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1979 throughout the world.

Baseball Tonight

Baseball Tonight was a program that aired on ESPN. The show, which covered the day's Major League Baseball action, was on the air from 1990 to 2018.

Its namesake program also airs on ESPN Radio at various times of the day during the baseball season, with Marc Kestecher as host.

Baseball Tonight is also the title of a daily podcast hosted by Buster Olney with frequent appearances by Jayson Stark, Tim Kurkjian, Karl Ravech, and Jerry Crasnick. As of April 27, 2017, all airings of the program, other than its Sunday airing, have been replaced by MLB Network's Intentional Talk.

Bob Goodrich

Bob Goodrich was an All-American football player who has become one of television’s most respected sports producers.

Bob Prince

Robert Ferris Prince (July 1, 1916 – June 10, 1985) was an American radio and television sportscaster and commentator best known for his 28-year stint as the voice of the Pittsburgh Pirates Major League Baseball club, with whom he earned the nickname "The Gunner" and became a cultural icon in Pittsburgh.

Prince was one of the most distinct and popular voices in sports broadcast history, known for his gravel voice, unabashed style and clever nicknames and phrases, which came to be known as "Gunnerisms." His unique manner influenced a number of broadcasters after him, including Pittsburgh Penguins voice Mike Lange and Pittsburgh Steelers color analyst Myron Cope.

Prince called Pirates games from 1948 to 1975, including the World Series championship years of 1960 and 1971. Nationally, Prince broadcast the 1960, 1966, and 1971 World Series and the 1965 All-Star Game for NBC, as well as the first year (1976) of ABC's Monday Night Baseball. He also broadcast at different times for other Pittsburgh-area sports teams, including Steelers football and Penguins hockey.

Boston Red Sox Radio Network

The Boston Red Sox Radio Network consists of 61 stations (39 A.M., 22 F.M. and 7 F.M. translators) in the 6 New England states, along with New York, and Florida. The primary English-language announcer is Joe Castiglione and a group of co-hosts, who alternate play-by-play and color commentary. In 2015, Rob Bradford and Lou Merloni filled in for former announcer Dave O'Brien when he called Monday Night Baseball for ESPN. Mike Mutnansky serves as pre- and post-game host.

In addition to the English-language network, there is a 2-station Spanish-language network (both A.M.) with affiliates in italics. This brings the total number of stations carrying Red Sox baseball to 63. The "Red Sox Radio Network" specifically refers to the English-language network originating at WEEI-FM. The Spanish-language network, with Uri Berenguer announcing, is called the "Spanish Beisbol Network".

Shaw's and Star Market Supermarkets, a grocery store chain which serves much of New England, is the primary promotional sponsor of Red Sox' English-language radio broadcasts. Thus, the announcers refer to the "Shaw's and Star Market WEEI Red Sox Radio Network" when entering into commercial spot breaks during the broadcast.

Corey McPherrin

Corey B. McPherrin (born March 10, 1955), known professionally as Corey McPherrin, is the morning news anchor for WFLD-TV in Chicago.

Dave Flemming

David Braxton Flemming (born May 31, 1976) is an American sportscaster, currently working as a play-by-play announcer for the San Francisco Giants of Major League Baseball as well as college football, college basketball, and Monday Night Baseball on ESPN and NBA basketball on ESPN Radio.

Flemming grew up in Alexandria, Virginia, listening to current Giants partner Jon Miller call Baltimore Orioles games. In 2004, Flemming began his first full year as an announcer for the team, working with Miller, Duane Kuiper and Mike Krukow on San Francisco station KNBR and the Giants Radio Network. He currently splits time between the Giants' radio and television broadcasts.

ESPN Major League Baseball

ESPN Major League Baseball is a presentation of Major League Baseball on ESPN and ESPN2. ESPN's MLB coverage debuted on April 9, 1990 with three Opening Day telecasts. ESPN Major League Baseball is guaranteed to remain on air until 2021. Starting in 2014, ESPN will return to broadcasting postseason baseball. ESPN has rights to any potential tiebreaker games (Game 163) and one of the two wild card games (Turner Sports receiving the other game).

The different weekly regular-season packages that ESPN presents (as of 2014) are Sunday Night Baseball, Monday Night Baseball and Wednesday Night Baseball. The network also airs select games on Opening Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, and Labor Day.

In addition to regular-season games, ESPN also airs several spring training games per year, the Taco Bell All-Star Legends and Celebrity Softball Game and Home Run Derby played the week of the All-Star Game, and (as of 2014) one of the two Wild Card games each postseason. ESPN also airs a weekly highlight show called Baseball Tonight at 7 p.m. ET on Sundays as a lead-in to Sunday Night Baseball; previously it was a daily program until 2017, when layoffs cut back the show’s airing to Sundays.

ESPN Radio has also been airing Major League Baseball since 1998 (succeeding CBS Radio), broadcasting Sunday Night Baseball as well as select other regular-season games, the All-Star Game and Home Run Derby, and the entire postseason including the Wild Card Game, Division Series, League Championship Series, and World Series.

Gary Miller (sportscaster)

Gary Miller (born October 31, 1956) is an American sportscaster and radio host.

List of ESPN Major League Baseball broadcasters

ESPN Major League Baseball broadcasters are listed below, including games broadcast only on ESPN currently and formerly.

List of ESPN personalities

Present television personalities on the ESPN network.

List of Major League Baseball on ESPN Radio broadcasters

Listed below is a list of Major League Baseball on ESPN Radio broadcasters by both name and year since the program's debut on ESPN Radio in 1998.

List of programs broadcast by ESPN

The following is a list of programs currently, formerly, or soon to be broadcast on either ESPN, ESPN2 or ESPN on ABC.

MNB

MNB may refer to:

Merchants National Bank (disambiguation), several U.S. banks

Monday Night Baseball, a live game telecast of Major League Baseball

Mongolian National Broadcaster, a public service broadcaster in Mongolia

Moody National Bank, a bank in Galveston, Texas

Belgian National Movement, a World War II Belgian Resistance group

Hungarian National Bank (Magyar Nemzeti Bank), the Hungarian name of the central bank of Hungary

Menadione Nicotinamide Bisulfite, a synthetic chemical compound – see Menadione

Major League Baseball on ABC

Major League Baseball on ABC is the de facto title of a program that televises Major League Baseball games on the American Broadcasting Company (ABC). The program has appeared in various forms c. 1953-1965 (ABC Game of the Week), 1976–1989 (Monday Night Baseball, Thursday Night Baseball, and Sunday Afternoon Baseball), and 1994–1995 (Baseball Night in America). ABC has not televised Major League Baseball since Game 5 of the 1995 World Series (October 26).

Night Baseball

Night Baseball may refer to:

Sunday Night Baseball

Monday Night Baseball

Wednesday Night Baseball

Thursday Night Baseball

Wednesday Night Baseball

Wednesday Night Baseball is a live game telecast of Major League Baseball that airs every Wednesday night during the regular season on ESPN. The game starts at 7pm ET, following SportsCenter, and usually lasts around three hours with an hour-long Baseball Tonight following the game leading up to the 11pm ET SportsCenter (1am ET for September games with Baseball Tonight moving to ESPN2 at 12am ET). The official name is ESPN Wednesday Night Baseball presented by Hankook Tire. Every April some broadcasts air on ESPN2 due to ESPN's priority with Wednesday's NBA coverage.

Wednesday Night Baseball is not exclusive to ESPN. The teams' local broadcasters may still air the game. ESPNEWS is seen on ESPN during the game in the teams' designated markets, unless local broadcasters choose not to televise the game. ESPN's blackout (100-mile radius from the stadium, and all of a team's designated market) can be lifted in the latter scenario. On double-headers in September, due to the broadcast of Monday Night Football, either one of the Wednesday Night Baseball games will co-exist with the local markets' carriers and will not always be subject to blackout.

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