Moe Szyslak

Morris "Moe" Szyslak /ˈsɪzlæk/ is a recurring character from the animated television series The Simpsons. He is voiced by Hank Azaria and first appeared in the series premiere episode "Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire".[1] Moe is the proprietor and bartender of Moe's Tavern, a Springfield bar frequented by Homer Simpson, Barney Gumble, Lenny Leonard, Carl Carlson, Sam, Larry, and others.

Grouchy, lonely, miserable and prone to violent outbursts, Moe is constantly down on his luck, and has attempted suicide numerous times. Other running jokes featuring him include being prank called by Bart Simpson, running illegal activities from his bar, and an ambiguous ethnic origin.

Moe Szyslak
The Simpsons character
Moe Szyslak
First appearance"Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire" (1989)
Created byMatt Groening
Sam Simon
Voiced byHank Azaria
Information
GenderMale
OccupationBartender
FamilyMrs. Szyslak (mother)
Morty Szyslak (father)
Minnie Szyslak (sister)
Marv Szyslak (brother)
Stringfellow Szyslak (brother)
Gandamac Szyslak (brother)
Portia Szyslak (sister)

Role in The Simpsons

Moe's Tavern

Moe is the owner and operator of Moe's Tavern, frequented by Homer Simpson and other characters including Lenny Leonard, Carl Carlson, Sam and Larry and his former most loyal customer, Barney Gumble. The bar is noted for its depressing atmosphere and uncleanliness. The regular patrons of the tavern have been abandoned by Moe in several episodes in which he changes its target audience. The first of these was "Flaming Moe's", in the third season. As a running joke, Moe is sometimes seen engaging in unlicensed or illegal activities at the tavern, such as smuggling pandas and an orca in "Cape Feare" and "The Springfield Files", respectively. Particularly in earlier episodes, the Tavern was frequently prank called by Bart Simpson, who would ask for a gag name which when said by Moe would involve innuendo or insults (e.g., Mike Rotch/"My crotch" and Seymour Butts/"See more butts").

Personality

Moe is portrayed with a generally disagreeable personality: he has a short, violent temper, a penurious nature, a crass and undiplomatic manner of speech, and a mood that rapidly vacillates between anger, indifference and suicidal despair (the latter of which has become more apparent in later episodes of the show). He has an annual Christmas tradition of attempted suicide, but his attempts are comically unsuccessful (landing on a hot-air balloon after jumping out of a plane, for example), and he has already called the suicide hotline so many times that they've blocked his number.

He is easily irritated, frequently threatening the patrons at his bar with a shotgun he keeps behind the counter. He is also gullible, and Bart's unending chain of successful prank calls to his bar are particularly infuriating to him, inevitably prompting a torrent of Red Deutsch-style threats of gruesome bodily harm in return.

He also is, however, occasionally shown to have a sentimental and caring side to his personality, such as reading to sick children and the homeless, although he is secretive about such behavior. In his interactions with his various girlfriends, he has also shown genuine selflessness and kindness (as well as an unusual improvement in his disposition), although negative elements of his personality inevitably emerge and ruin things. In "Thank God It's Doomsday", he asks for salvation, because "I've done stuff I ain't proud of. And the stuff I am proud of is disgusting."[2]

Relationships

Moe has an almost non-existent love life due to his vulgarity towards women and his ugly appearance. Despite this, he has had a number of romantic experiences, including sleeping with his waitress Collette,[3] dating a woman named Renee,[4] and briefly enjoying the company of many women after he had plastic surgery.[5] He also has a relationship and proposed to a dwarf named Maya, but Moe could not adjust to the difference in height, to the point where his ultimate plan to have his own leg bones shortened led Maya to leave him. He has long been infatuated with Marge Simpson, whom he calls "Midge", and has on occasion tried to win her away from Homer,[6][7] although later episodes have shown him actively working to keep the two together.[8] He has been romantically involved with Edna Krabappel[9] as well as Marge's sister Selma Bouvier. Moe's romantic attractions have resulted in run-ins with the law; he has stalked Maude Flanders and other townspeople, he must register as a sex offender, and he has a restraining order placed upon him. At one point he is seen on his way to a "V.D. clinic".[10] Despite his disturbing approach, Moe has showed to be a caring and devoted lover. While dating Renee (and previously Edna), he wholeheartedly spoiled them with whatever they wanted and vowed to give up his bar and take them away from Springfield forever, even if it means losing his own money and doing illegal acts to make more money. When he thought he finally won Marge's heart, he promised to be "the best man she'd ever had".[7]

In "Pygmoelian", Moe and his three closest friends assess him as a gargoyle with cauliflower ears, lizard lips, little rat eyes, a caveman brow and fish snout, who is not pleasant to look at, listen to or be with.[11]

Family and biography

The Season 29 episode King Leer, finally reveals Moe's backstory and shows his family. Revealing Moe's father, who is called Morty still lives, and that Moe has a brother and a sister. Moe's family works in the business of selling mattress and beds, having a franchise with multiple stores in Springfield, the key to the success was that Moe's father kept infesting all rival business with termites, making his business the only reliable one. When Morty asks a young Moe to infest a rival business, Moe refuses, then the family of the business Moe refused to infest, infests one of the mattress stores of Moe's father, and as a consequence Moe's dad stops speaking to him. Decades later Moe and his father reconnect in the episode. Previous to that appearance of Moe's family, the show had given many wildly inconsistent backstories regarding Moe's past, in "Moe Goes from Rags to Riches" (2012), an infant Moe is even depicted living on Mount Everest as the son of a Yeti.[12][13]

MoeSzyslak-TheLittleRascals
Moe (left) as "Smelly" in The Little Rascals.

Prior to that revelation, numerous one-off jokes had been made regarding Moe's childhood and his earlier adult years. In "Radioactive Man" (1995), he is depicted as having been one of the original Little Rascals, but was fired after killing the "original Alfalfa". However, charges were not pressed against him as the "original Alfalfa" was in fact an orphan owned by the studio. As Homer's boxing coach in "The Homer They Fall" (1996), he shows photographs from throughout his own boxing career, stating that his ugly appearance was the result of competing in the sport. Moe's college years are also depicted, in "Homer the Moe" (2001), which shows Moe as having attended "bartending school" at Swigmore University (a play on Skidmore College) before opening what became Moe's Tavern.[14] In "Springfield Up" (2007), footage from a documentary called Growing Up Springfield shows an 8-year-old Moe claiming that his father was a circus freak. He was unsure which one, but liked to think it was a little of all of them.[15] This is further reinforced in "Sleeping With The Enemy" when he briefly asserts himself as a member of the Muntz family. After Nelson's father returns, blaming his absence on having been stolen away by the circus due to a peanut allergy disfiguring his face. Teenaged Moe is shown again in "She Used to Be My Girl" (2004), where he is depicted working in the school cafeteria, given as his first job "since prison"; Marge is responsible for having him sent back there. "The Seemingly Never-Ending Story" (2006) depicts scenes set years prior to the series' present in which Moe and schoolteacher Edna Krabappel are shown to have had a brief love affair. In "Them, Robot" (2012), a flashback scene depicts a young child being stomped on by an elephant, and his face then changing to Moe.

In "Flaming Moe's" (1991), he is called Morris by his lover, and while in "The Springfield Connection" (1995), (Homer refers to Moe by the Arabic "Moammar", and in "Eeny Teeny Maya Moe" (2009), he suggests that he only changed his name to Moe when he purchased Moe's Tavern. The show's many conflicting stories as to Moe's heritage have been sent up in the tie-in book The Book of Moe (2008), where Moe is depicted in several different foreign national folk costumes commenting upon them. An early joke in the series was that Moe was a European immigrant to the United States. In "Much Apu About Nothing" (1996), Moe is depicted taking his United States citizenship test;[16] previously, "Bart's Inner Child" (1993) had depicted Moe's own inner child chastising him for abandoning his native Italian accent. Later, in "Bart-Mangled Banner" (2004), he reveals himself to be Dutch, and in "Lisa Goes Gaga" (2012), Moe describes himself as "half monster, half Armenian." Moe is also hinted to be Armenian in "Judge Me Tender" (2010), claiming that Armenian Idol is his favorite show. As for indications he was born in America, in "Homer the Heretic" (1992), Moe's claims "I was born a snake handler and I'll die a snake handler" while in "Day of the Jackanapes" (2001) he claims to have been born in Indiana.[17] Azaria has mentioned that Moe is from the Queens borough of New York City.[18]

Character

Creation

The creator of The Simpsons Matt Groening based Moe on Louis "Red" Deutsch, who was made famous when he was repeatedly prank called by two Jersey City residents. These prank calls were the inspiration for Bart Simpson's repeated prank calls to Moe, and Deutsch's often profane responses inspired Moe's violent temper.[19] Comedian Rich Hall, an acquaintance of The Simpsons writer George Meyer, has stated that he believes further inspiration was drawn from himself and that Groening has verified this to him.[20] Moe's surname "Szyslak" was revealed in "Who Shot Mr. Burns? (Part One)". Writers Bill Oakley and Josh Weinstein found the name in a phonebook and gave it to Moe so that he would have the initials M.S., and hence be a suspect in the Burns shooting.[21] Moe was designed by animator Dan Haskett and his facial appearance was modeled after a gorilla.[22][23] Animator Mark Kirkland said that he usually lets pass through production off-model drawings of Moe because the character is so ugly that no one will notice.[24]

Voice

Moe was the first voice Hank Azaria performed for the show. During the time of his audition, Azaria was doing a play in which he had the part of a drug dealer, basing his voice on actor Al Pacino in Dog Day Afternoon. He used the same voice in the audition, and was told by Matt Groening and Sam Simon, who were directing him, to make it more gravelly like Deutsch's voice. Groening and Simon thought that it was perfect and took Azaria over to the Fox network recording studio. The result is Moe's pronounced New York accent. Before he had even seen a script, Azaria recorded several lines of dialogue as Moe for the episode "Some Enchanted Evening".[25][26] Moe was originally voiced by actor Christopher Collins. Hank Azaria explained that he did not discover this fact for several years, and it was explained that Collins' acting was fine, but other staff and actors found Collins unpleasant to work with.[27] Collins recorded several lines as Moe which never aired.[26]

Reception

In 2001 and 2003, Hank Azaria won Primetime Emmy Awards for Outstanding Voice-Over Performance for voicing Moe and various other characters.[28]

See also

References

  1. ^ Rhodes, Joe (2000-10-21). "Flash! 24 Simpsons Stars Reveal Themselves". TV Guide.
  2. ^ Audio snippet from Thank God It's Doomsday
  3. ^ Cohen, Robert; Moore, Rich; Smart, Alan (1991-11-21). "Flaming Moe's". The Simpsons. Season 3. Episode 10. Fox.
  4. ^ "Dumbbell Indemnity". The Simpsons. Fox.
  5. ^ "Pygmoelian". The Simpsons. Fox.
  6. ^ "Secrets of a Successful Marriage". The Simpsons. Fox.
  7. ^ a b "Mommie Beerest". The Simpsons. Fox.
  8. ^ "Moho House". The Simpsons. Fox.
  9. ^ Maxtone-Graham, Ian; Persi, Raymond (2006-03-12). "The Seemingly Never-Ending Story". The Simpsons. Season 17. Episode 13. Fox.
  10. ^ "Lost Our Lisa". The Simpsons. Fox.
  11. ^ Moe Syzlak quote from "Pygmoelian", IMDB
  12. ^ "Moe Goes from Rags to Riches"
  13. ^ https://tv.avclub.com/moe-goes-to-the-mattresses-with-his-family-on-a-service-1825282315
  14. ^ "Homer the Moe". The Simpsons. Fox.
  15. ^ "Springfield Up"
  16. ^ "Much Apu About Nothing". The Simpsons. Fox.
  17. ^ "Day of the Jackanapes". The Simpsons. Fox.
  18. ^ Simon, Scott (2017-05-13). "Hank Azaria Says 'Brockmire' Has Been With Him For Years". Weekend Edition. NPR. Moe is a New York guy, he's from Queens....
  19. ^ Kaulessar, Ricardo (2005-08-10). "Joke on 'Simpsons' started in JC". The Hudson Reporter. Archived from the original on 2008-09-25. Retrieved 2007-10-26. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  20. ^ Holt, Richard (24 September 2007). "Comic claims he is Simpsons' Moe the Barman". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 6 January 2018.
  21. ^ Oakley, Bill (2005). Commentary for "Who Shot Mr. Burns? (Part One)", in The Simpsons: The Complete Seventh Season [DVD]. 20th Century Fox.
  22. ^ Silverman, David (2001). Commentary for "Bart the General", in The Simpsons: The Complete First Season [DVD]. 20th Century Fox.
  23. ^ Reiss, Mike (2004). Commentary for "Homer's Barbershop Quartet", in The Simpsons: The Complete Fifth Season [DVD]. 20th Century Fox.
  24. ^ Kirkland, Mark (2004). Commentary for "Bart Sells His Soul", in The Simpsons: The Complete Seventh Season [DVD]. 20th Century Fox.
  25. ^ Azaria, Hank (2004-12-06). "Fresh Air". National Public Radio (Interview). Interviewed by Terry Gross. Philadelphia: WHYY-FM. Retrieved 2007-08-15.
  26. ^ a b Azaria, Hank; Jean, Al (2004). Commentary for "Homer's Barbershop Quartet", in The Simpsons: The Complete Fifth Season [DVD]. 20th Century Fox.
  27. ^ Hank Azaria Breaks Down His Iconic Simpsons Voices and Movie Roles | GQ, retrieved 2018-06-25
  28. ^ "Primetime Emmy Awards Advanced Search". Emmys.org. Archived from the original on 2009-02-15. Retrieved 2008-12-10.

External links

Dude, Where's My Ranch?

"Dude, Where's My Ranch?" is the eighteenth episode of The Simpsons' fourteenth season. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on April 27, 2003. It was written by Ian Maxtone-Graham and was the first episode directed by Chris Clements.

Edna Krabappel

Edna Krabappel-Flanders (also Krabappel) is a fictional character from the animated American sitcom The Simpsons, who was voiced by Marcia Wallace from 1990 until her death in October 2013. She was a 4th grade teacher, who taught Bart Simpson's class at Springfield Elementary School. In the twenty-third season, she married Ned Flanders, the widower of Maude Flanders, helping raise Rod and Todd Flanders until her death.

Edna is the only character that Wallace voiced on a regular basis. Following Wallace's death, the show's producers announced their intention to retire the character. Edna Krabappel's final speaking role was the epilogue of the 25th season episode "The Man Who Grew Too Much".

Flaming Moe's

"Flaming Moe's" is the tenth episode of The Simpsons' third season. It first aired on the Fox network in the United States on November 21, 1991. In the episode, Homer tells Moe Szyslak of a secret alcoholic cocktail that includes cough medicine and fire that he calls "Flaming Homer". Moe steals the recipe from Homer, renames the drink the "Flaming Moe" and begins selling it at his tavern. The drink is a success and boosts business and patronage, but Homer is angry at Moe for his betrayal, and seeks revenge.

The episode was written by Robert Cohen and directed by Rich Moore, with assistance from Alan Smart. "Flaming Moe's" was the first episode of the show to feature Moe in a prominent role. The main plot of the episode in which Moe's Tavern becomes famous because of a drink is loosely based on the Los Angeles establishment Coconut Teaszer. The episode also parodies the television series Cheers, including the theme song "Where Everybody Knows Your Name", and a character named Collette is modeled after Shelley Long's character Diane Chambers. Catherine O'Hara originally recorded dialogue for the part of Colette, but the writers felt her voice did not fit the role and instead used a track recorded by regular Jo Ann Harris.

American rock band Aerosmith (Steven Tyler, Tom Hamilton, Joey Kramer, Joe Perry and Brad Whitford) appears in the episode. They were the first band to make a guest appearance on the show. Their dialogue was recorded in Boston with Hank Azaria, the voice of Moe, who flew over to record his part with them and help them with their lines.

The episode has been well received by critics and has been included in best Simpsons episode lists by IGN, Entertainment Weekly, AskMen.com and AOL. In its original airing during the November sweeps period, the episode had a 14.4 Nielsen rating and finished the week ranked 29th.

Hank Azaria

Henry Albert Azaria ( ə-ZAIR-ee-ə; born April 25, 1964) is an American actor, voice actor, singer, comedian and producer. He is known for his voice characterizations as a variety of characters in the animated sitcom The Simpsons (1989–present), which has included Moe Szyslak, Apu Nahasapeemapetilon, Chief Wiggum, Comic Book Guy, Carl Carlson and others. After attending Tufts University, he joined the series with little voice acting experience, but became a regular in its second season, with many of his performances on the show being based on famous actors and characters.

In addition to his work on The Simpsons, Azaria became more widely known for his live-action appearances in feature films such as The Birdcage (1996), Godzilla (1998), Mystery Men (1999), America's Sweethearts (2001), Shattered Glass (2003), Along Came Polly (2004), Run Fatboy Run (2007), Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian (2009) and The Smurfs (2011). Since 2017, he has starred as the titular character in Brockmire.

Azaria had recurring roles on the television series Mad About You and Friends, as the titular character in the drama Huff (2004–2006) and appeared in the popular stage musical Spamalot. Originally known as a comedic actor, he has also taken on more dramatic roles, including the TV films Tuesdays With Morrie (1999) and Uprising (2001). He has won six Emmys and a Screen Actors Guild Award. He was married to actress Helen Hunt from 1999 to 2000 and has been married to actress Katie Wright since 2007.

List of The Simpsons cast members

The Simpsons is an American animated sitcom that includes six main voice actors and numerous regular cast and recurring guest stars. The principal cast consists of Dan Castellaneta, Julie Kavner, Nancy Cartwright, Yeardley Smith, Hank Azaria and Harry Shearer. Chris Edgerly, Pamela Hayden, Tress MacNeille, Kevin Michael Richardson, Maggie Roswell, and Russi Taylor have appeared as supporting cast members, along with former supporting cast members Karl Wiedergott, Marcia Mitzman Gaven, Doris Grau, and Christopher Collins. Repeat guest cast members include Marcia Wallace, Albert Brooks, Phil Hartman, Jon Lovitz, Joe Mantegna and Kelsey Grammer. With one exception, episode credits list only the voice actors, and not the characters they voice.

Both Fox and the production crew wanted to keep their identities secret during the early seasons and closed most of the recording sessions while refusing to publish photos of the recording artists. The network eventually revealed which roles each actor performed in the episode "Old Money", because the producers said the voice actors should receive credit for their work. Every main cast member has won an Emmy for Outstanding Voice-Over Performance. Shearer was the last cast member to win, receiving his award in 2014 for the episode "Four Regrettings and a Funeral." Castellaneta and Azaria have won four, while Kavner, Cartwright, Smith, Shearer, Wallace, Grammer, and guest star Jackie Mason have each won one.

List of bartenders

This is a list of notable bartenders. A bartender (also known as a barkeep, barman, barmaid, or a mixologist) is a person who serves alcoholic beverages and other drinks behind a bar, typically in a licensed establishment.

Minoru Inaba

Minoru Inaba (稲葉 実, Inaba Minoru, born November 8, 1951) is a Japanese voice actor from Shizuoka Prefecture. He is affiliated with Ken Production.

Inaba is best known for his roles in Disney productions (as Dale), Buzz Lightyear of Star Command (as Buzz Lightyear), and The Transformers (as Cyclonus and Razorclaw).

Moe's

Moe's or Moes may refer to:

Moe's Southwest Grill, an American fast casual restaurant franchise

Moe's Tavern, operated by Moe Szyslak in The Simpsons

Flaming Moe's, a 1991 episode of The Simpsons

Moe's bar and lounge, a popular Fort Greene bar that closed in April 2011

Moes (TV series), a 2008 Dutch TV series

Ateliers Moës-Freres a Belgian engineering company from 1904-1969

Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Character Voice-Over Performance

This is a list of winners and nominees of the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Character Voice-Over Performance.

In 2014, the award for Outstanding Voice-Over Performance was separated into two categories – Outstanding Narrator and Outstanding Character Voice-Over Performance. As with longform and reality, this split acknowledges and accommodates a general industry uptrend in the distinctly different achievements that are VO narration and VO character performance.

Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Voice-Over Performance

The Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Voice-Over Performance is a Creative Arts Emmy Award given out by the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. It is awarded to a performer for an outstanding "continuing or single voice-over performance in a series or a special." Prior to 1992, voice-actors could be nominated for their performance in the live action acting categories. The award was first given in 1992 when six voice actors from The Simpsons shared the award. From 1992 to 2008, it was a juried award, so there were no nominations and there would be multiple or no recipients in one year. In 2009, the rules were changed to a category award, with five nominees.

Usually, the winner is a voice actor from an animated show, but some narrators of live action shows have won such as Keith David in 2005 and 2008. No winner was named in 1996 or 2007.Nine voice actors from The Simpsons have won a combined 14 Emmys. Of those, Dan Castellaneta has won four and Hank Azaria has won three. Ja'net Dubois has won two for The PJs, Keith David has won two for his narration of various documentaries and Maurice LaMarche has won two for Futurama. Voice actors from shows on Fox have won 17 of 27 awards.

In 2014, the category was separated into two categories – Outstanding Narrator and Outstanding Character Voice-Over Performance. As with longform and reality, this split acknowledges and accommodates a general industry uptrend in the distinctly different achievements that are VO narration and VO character performance.

Pygmoelian

"Pygmoelian" is the sixteenth episode of the eleventh season of the American animated sitcom The Simpsons. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on February 27, 2000. In the episode, after getting his face censored out on the Duff Beer calendar for not being photogenic, Moe Szyslak gets plastic surgery and becomes the star of a popular soap opera.

Some Enchanted Evening (The Simpsons)

"Some Enchanted Evening" is the thirteenth and final episode of The Simpsons' first season. It was originally broadcast on the Fox network in the United States on May 13, 1990. Written by Matt Groening and Sam Simon and directed by David Silverman and Kent Butterworth, "Some Enchanted Evening" was the first episode produced for season one and was intended to air as the series premiere in fall 1989, but aired as the season one finale due to animation issues. The Christmas special "Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire" premiered in its place on December 17, 1989. It is the last episode to feature the original opening sequence starting from "Bart the Genius". In the episode, Homer and Marge go on a night out while leaving the children under the care of a diabolical babysitter named Ms. Botz.

Penny Marshall provided the voice of Ms. Botz. The episode features cultural references to such films as The Night of the Hunter and Psycho as well as a musical reference to A Star Is Born. Since its initial broadcast, the episode has received mixed reviews from television critics. It acquired a Nielsen rating of 15.4, and was the highest-rated show on the Fox network the week it aired.

Teo Bellia

Teo Romano Bellia (born January 17, 1960) is an Italian actor, voice actor and journalist.

The Homer They Fall

"The Homer They Fall" is the third episode of The Simpsons' eighth season. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on November 10, 1996. After Homer realizes he has a bizarre medical condition that renders him unable to be knocked out, he is convinced to embark on a career as a boxer by Moe Szyslak, who manages him. The episode was written by Jonathan Collier and directed by Mark Kirkland. It guest stars Michael Buffer as himself and Paul Winfield as Lucius Sweet.

The Monkey Suit

"The Monkey Suit" is the twenty-first episode of the seventeenth season of the American animated sitcom The Simpsons. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on May 14, 2006. In the episode, Ned Flanders is shocked after seeing a new display at the museum about evolution. Together with Reverend Lovejoy, he spreads the religious belief of creationism in Springfield, and at a later town meeting, teaching evolution is made illegal. As a result, Lisa decides to hold secret classes for people interested in evolution. However, she is quickly arrested and a trial against her is initiated.

J. Stewart Burns wrote "The Monkey Suit", for which he received inspiration from the 1925 Scopes Monkey Trial. The episode features a few references to this legal case, as well as several references to popular culture. Many analysts have commented on the episode's treatment of the creation–evolution controversy, a dispute about the origin of humanity between those who support a creationist view based upon their religious beliefs, versus those who accept evolution, as supported by scientific evidence.

Critics have given the episode generally positive reviews, praising it for its satire of the creation-evolution debate. "The Monkey Suit" has won an award from the Independent Investigations Group (IIG) for being "one of those rare shows in the media that encourage science, critical thinking, and ridicule those shows that peddle pseudoscience and superstition." In 2007, a scene from the episode was highlighted in the scientific journal Nature.

The Simpsons (season 14)

The Simpsons' fourteenth season was originally broadcast on the Fox network in the United States between November 3, 2002 and May 18, 2003. The show runner for the fourteenth production season was Al Jean, who executive produced 21 of 22 episodes. The other episode, "How I Spent My Strummer Vacation", was run by Mike Scully. The season contains five hold-overs from the previous season's production run. The fourteenth season has met with mostly positive reviews and won two Primetime Emmy Awards, including Outstanding Animated Program (For Programming less than One Hour), four Annie Awards and a Writers Guild of America Award. This season contains the show's 300th episode, "The Strong Arms of the Ma".

Writers credited with episodes in the fourteenth season included J. Stewart Burns, Kevin Curran, John Frink & Don Payne, Dana Gould, Dan Greaney, Brian Kelley, Tim Long, Ian Maxtone-Graham, Carolyn Omine, Mike Scully, Matt Selman, John Swartzwelder, Matt Warburton and Marc Wilmore. Freelance writers included Brian Pollack & Mert Rich, Sam O'Neal & Neal Boushall, Dennis Snee and Allen Glazier. Animation directors included Bob Anderson, Mike B. Anderson, Chris Clements, Mark Kirkland, Lance Kramer, Nancy Kruse, Lauren MacMullan, Pete Michels, Steven Dean Moore, Matthew Nastuk, Michael Polcino, Jim Reardon and David Silverman. The main cast consisted of Dan Castellaneta (Homer Simpson, Grampa Simpson, Krusty the Clown among others), Julie Kavner (Marge Simpson), Nancy Cartwright (Bart Simpson, Ralph Wiggum, Nelson Muntz), Yeardley Smith (Lisa Simpson), Hank Azaria (Moe Szyslak, Apu, Chief Wiggum, among others) and Harry Shearer (Ned Flanders, Mr. Burns, Principal Skinner, among others). Other cast members included Marcia Wallace (Edna Krabappel), Pamela Hayden (Milhouse Van Houten, among others), Tress MacNeille (Agnes Skinner, among others), Russi Taylor (Martin Prince) and Karl Wiedergott (Additional Voices). This season also saw the return of voice actress Maggie Roswell (Helen Lovejoy, Maude Flanders, among others), who had left the show during season 11 because of a contract dispute."Barting Over", which aired February 16, 2003, was promoted as the show's milestone 300th episode. However, "The Strong Arms of the Ma" was the 300th episode to be broadcast. According to Ben Rayner of the Toronto Star, "It's very difficult to find a straight answer why milestone status has been bestowed on ["Barting Over"]. Some rationalize that the 300 figure doesn't account for two early holiday specials, Fox maintains that there was some discrepancy between the original, scheduled broadcast date- deep in the heart of the ratings-mad February sweeps- and the number of episodes that were eventually aired leading up to it." "Barting Over" refers to the error when Marge tells Lisa "I can't count the number of times (Homer) has done something crazy like this." Lisa responds that it is 300, to which Marge replies that she "could have sworn it's been 302".

The Simpsons Spin-Off Showcase

"The Simpsons Spin-Off Showcase" is the twenty-fourth episode of the eighth season of The Simpsons. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on May 11, 1997. The episode centers on fictional pilot episodes of non-existent television series derived from The Simpsons, and is a parody of the tendency of networks to spin off characters from a hit series. As such it includes references to many different TV series. The first fictional spin-off is Chief Wiggum P.I., a cop-dramedy featuring Chief Wiggum and Seymour Skinner. The second is The Love-matic Grampa, a sitcom featuring Moe Szyslak who receives dating advice from Abraham Simpson, whose ghost is possessing a love testing machine. The final segment is The Simpson Family Smile-Time Variety Hour, a variety show featuring the Simpson family except for Lisa, who has been replaced.

The episode was written by David S. Cohen, Dan Greaney and Steve Tompkins, with Ken Keeler coming up with the story and the general idea of intentionally bad writing. It was directed by Neil Affleck, and Tim Conway, Gailard Sartain and Phil Hartman guest-starred. The producers were initially uneasy about the episode, as they feared that the purposely bad writing would be mistaken for actual bad writing. The episode, however, now appears on several lists of the most popular Simpsons episodes.

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