Minnesota Golden Gophers

The Minnesota Golden Gophers (commonly shortened to Gophers) are the college sports teams of the University of Minnesota. The university fields a total of 23 (11 men's, 12 women's) teams in both men's and women's sports and competes in the Big Ten Conference.

The Gophers women's ice hockey team is a six-time NCAA champion and seven-time national champion.[2][3] In women's ice hockey, the Gophers belong to the Western Collegiate Hockey Association. In all other sports, they belong to the Big Ten Conference. Most of the facilities that the teams use for training and competitive play are located on the East Bank of the Minneapolis campus. There are arenas for men's and women's basketball (Williams Arena) as well as ice hockey (Mariucci Arena and Ridder Arena). The Gopher football team began playing at TCF Bank Stadium in September 2009. The women's soccer team plays on the St. Paul campus in Elizabeth Lyle Robbie Stadium.

The Cheerleaders and the Dance Team are also part of the university's athletic department; they are present at events for basketball, ice hockey, and football, and compete for UCA/UDA national titles in the winter. The University of Minnesota spirit squad was the first as sideline cheerleading was invented at the U of M, and it currently prides itself in being one of the largest spirit squads in the country. The U of M spirit squad currently consists of three cheerleading teams (all girl, coed, and small coed), a dance team, Goldy Gopher, and a unique ice hockey cheerleading team. The dance team just won its 19th national title.

During the 2006–07 academic year, the Golden Gophers wrestling team won the NCAA national championship and the Big Ten team title. The Golden Gophers also won conference championships in men's ice hockey, men's golf, women's rowing, men's swimming and diving, and women's indoor track and field.

Minnesota Golden Gophers
Logo
UniversityUniversity of Minnesota
ConferenceBig Ten
NCAADivision I/FBS
Athletic directorMark Coyle
LocationMinneapolis, Minnesota
Varsity teams23
Football stadiumTCF Bank Stadium
Basketball arenaWilliams Arena
Ice hockey arena3M Arena at Mariucci (men)
Ridder Arena (women)
Baseball stadiumSiebert Field
U.S. Bank Stadium (February and March, 2017–)
Soccer stadiumElizabeth Lyle Robbie Stadium
Other arenasMaturi Pavilion
MascotGoldy Gopher
NicknameGolden Gophers
Fight songMinnesota Rouser
ColorsMaroon and Gold[1]
         
Websitewww.gophersports.com
Big Ten logo in Minnesota colors
Big Ten logo in Minnesota's colors

Sports sponsored

Men's sports Women's sports
Baseball Basketball
Basketball Cross country
Cross country Golf
Football Gymnastics
Golf Ice hockey
Gymnastics Rowing
Ice hockey Soccer
Swimming and diving Softball
Tennis Swimming and diving
Track and field Tennis
Wrestling Track and field
Volleyball
† – Track and field includes both indoor and outdoor

Baseball

1956, 1960, 1964
  • NCAA Tournament Appearances (32):
1956, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1964, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1973, 1974, 1976, 1977, 1981, 1982, 1985, 1987, 1988, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2003, 2004, 2007, 2009, 2010, 2016, 2018
  • Big Ten Regular Season Championships (24):
1933, 1935, 1956, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1964, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1973, 1974, 1977, 1982, 1985, 1988, 1992, 2000, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2010, 2016, 2018
1982, 1985, 1988, 1992, 1998, 2001, 2004, 2010, 2018

Men's basketball

1906, 1907, 1911, 1917, 1919, 1937, 1972, 1982
  • NCAA Tournament Appearances (10):
1972, 1982, 1989, 1990, 2005, 2009, 2010, 2013, 2017, 2019
  • Sweet 16 Appearances (3):
1982, 1989, 1990
  • Elite Eight Appearances (1):
1990
  • NIT Appearances (12):
1973, 1980, 1981, 1983, 1992, 1993, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2008, 2012, 2014
  • NIT Championships (2):
1993, 2014

Note: A 1997 Big Ten regular season championship, NCAA Tournament appearances in 1994, 1995, 1997 (Final Four), and 1999, as well as NIT appearances in 1996 and 1998 (Championship) were vacated due to NCAA sanctions.[4][5]

Women's basketball

  • NCAA Tournament Appearances (10):
1994, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2015, 2018
  • Sweet 16 Appearances (3):
2003, 2004, 2005
  • Elite Eight Appearances (1):
2004
  • Final Four Appearances (1):
2004

Men's cross country

  • Big Ten Team Championships (4):
1909, 1914, 1964, 1969

Women's cross country

Umncc07
Women's Cross Country Team runs the OZ invitational on the Les Bolstad Golf Course.
  • Big Ten Team Championships (2):
2007, 2008

Football

1904, 1934, 1935, 1936, 1940, 1941, 1960
1900, 1903, 1904, 1906, 1909, 1910, 1911, 1915, 1927, 1933, 1934, 1935, 1937, 1938, 1940, 1941, 1960, 1967
1892, 1893
  • Bowl Games (20):
Citrus Bowl – 2015
Hall of Fame Classic –1977
Holiday Bowl – 2016
Independence Bowl – 1985
Insight Bowl – 2006, 2008, 2009
Liberty Bowl – 1986
MicronPC.com Bowl – 2000
Music City Bowl – 2002, 2004, 2005
Quick Lane Bowl – 2015, 2018
Meineke Car Care Bowl of Texas – 2012
Rose Bowl – 1961, 1962
Sun Bowl – 1999, 2003
Texas Bowl – 2013
  • Bowl game victories: 1962 Rose Bowl, 1985 Independence Bowl, 2002 Music City Bowl, 2003 Sun Bowl, 2004 Music City Bowl, 2015 Quick Lane Bowl, 2016 Holiday Bowl, 2018 Quick Lane Bowl

Traveling trophies

Golf

Men's golf

2002
  • Individual National Champions (2):
1944 – Louis Lick
1998 – James McLean
  • Big Ten Team Championships (8):
1929, 1938, 1963, 1972, 2002, 2003, 2007 (co-champions), 2014

Women's golf

  • Big Ten Team Championships (1):
1989

Gymnastics

Men's gymnastics

  • Big Ten Team Championships (21):
1903, 1907, 1910, 1925, 1936, 1938, 1940, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1982, 1984, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1995

Women's gymnastics

  • Big Ten Team Championships (5):
1988, 1989, 1991, 1998, 2006

Men's ice hockey

1929,[6] 1940,[7] 1974, 1976, 1979, 2002, 2003
1953, 1954, 1970, 1975, 1981, 1983, 1988, 1989, 1992, 1997, 2006, 2007, 2012, 2013
2013–14
2014–15
2015
1961, 1971, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1993, 1994, 1996, 2003, 2004, 2007
  • NCAA Frozen Four Appearances (21):
1953, 1954, 1961, 1971, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1979, 1981, 1983, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1994, 1995, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2012, 2014

Women's ice hockey

2000 (AWCHA), 2004, 2005, 2012, 2013, 2015, 2016
  • WCHA Regular Season Championships (8):
2001, 2002, 2004, 2005, 2009, 2010, 2013, 2014
  • WCHA Tournament Championships (7):
2002, 2004, 2005, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
  • NCAA Frozen Four Appearances (14):
2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2009, 2010, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018

Women's rowing

  • Big Ten Championships (1):
2007
  • NCAA Champions in V2
2007

Women's soccer

  • Big Ten Championships (4):
1995, 1997, 2008, 2016

Softball

  • Big Ten Regular Season Championships (4):
1986, 1988, 1991, 2017
  • Big Ten Tournament Championships (5):
1999, 2014, 2016, 2017, 2018
1976, 1978[8]

Spirit Squads

Dance Team

  • National Championships (12):
2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017

Swimming

Men's swimming

  • Big Ten Team Championships (9):
1922, 1926, 1996, 1998, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2005, 2007

Women's swimming

  • Big Ten Team Championships (7):
1999, 2000, 2008, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015

Men's tennis

  • Big Ten Team Championships (15):
1910, 1911, 1912, 1918, 1932, 1933, 1981, 1984, 1986, 1989, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 2015

Men's track

Outdoor track and field

1948
  • Big Ten Team Championships (6):
1949, 1968, 1998, 1999, 2003, 2009, 2010

Indoor track and field

  • Big Ten Team Championships (4):
1998, 2009, 2010, 2011

Women's track

Outdoor track and field

  • Big Ten Team Championships (2):
2006, 2018

Indoor track and field

  • Big Ten Team Championships (3):
2007, 2008, 2009, 2018

Volleyball

2002, 2015, 2018
  • NCAA Tournament Appearances (21):
1989, 1993, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018
  • Sweet 16 Appearances (16):
1989, 1993, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2015, 2016
  • Final Four Appearances (5):
2003, 2004, 2009, 2015, 2016

Wrestling

2001, 2002, 2007
  • Big Ten Team Championships (12):
1910, 1912, 1913, 1941, 1957, 1959, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2006, 2007

Notable non varsity sports

Rugby

Minnesota rugby plays Division I college rugby in the Big Ten Universities conference against traditional Big 10 rivals such as Wisconsin and Iowa.[9] Minnesota qualified for the national playoffs in 2008, and finished the 2008 season ranked 7th in the nation.[10] Some of Minnesota's games have been well attended by fans, with the team drawing as many as 6,000 fans to watch the team play at TCF Bank Stadium.[11]

Traditions

The "Golden" Gophers

The University Mascot is derived from a nickname for the state of Minnesota, "The Gopher State." The original design was based on the thirteen-lined ground squirrel. The state nickname derives from a political cartoon by R. O. Sweeny, published as a broadside in 1858. The cartoon depicted state legislators as gophers dragging the state in the wrong direction.[12] The nickname was associated with the university as early as the publication of the first yearbook in 1888, which was titled "The Gopher".[13] Other early yearbooks included depictions of gophers as well, and the University of Minnesota football coach Clarence Spears officially named the football team the Gophers in 1926.[14] After the radio announcer Halsey Hall began referring to the team as the Golden Gophers due to the color of their uniforms, the team was renamed under coach Bernie Bierman.[15]

School songs

School songs for the university include Minnesota Rouser, Minnesota March, Go Gopher Victory, Our Minnesota, Minnesota Fight, Hail! Minnesota, and the Battle Hymn of the Republic.

Notable athletes and coaches

Baseball

Basketball

Men's

Women's

Football

Players

Coaches

Golf

Gymnastics

Hockey

Men's

Women's

Swimming

Track and field

Women's

Men's

Current Roster of the Minnesota Gophers Track & Field team 2009–2010

Wrestling

Athletic directors

Note: From 1974 to 2002, there were separate athletic departments for men and women's sports.

Facilities

Current facilities

Former facilities

See also

References

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External links

1900 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1900 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1900 Western Conference football season. In their first year under head coach Henry L. Williams, the Golden Gophers compiled a 10–0–2 record (3–0–1 against Western Conference opponents), finished in a tie for first place in the conference, shut out nine of their twelve opponents, and outscored all opponents by a combined total of 299 to 23. The hiring of Dr. Henry L. Williams for the 1900 season marked the first time the program was led by a full-time, salaried coach.

1903 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1903 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1903 college football season. In their fourth year under head coach Henry L. Williams, the Golden Gophers compiled a 14–0–1 record (3–0–1 against Western Conference opponents), shut out 13 of their 15 opponents, and outscored all opponents by a combined total of 656 to 12. The team finished the season in a tie with Michigan for the Western Conference co-championship. When Minnesota and Michigan met, the teams played to a tie in a game that gave rise the Little Brown Jug trophy.Four Minnesota players were recognized on the 1903 College Football All-America Team. Quarterback Sigmund Harris received first-team honors from Fielding H. Yost and third-team honors from Walter Camp. Tackle Fred Schacht received first-team honors from Caspar Whitney and second-team honors from Camp and Yost. Center Moses Strathern received second-team honors from Camp. And, end Eddie Rogers received third-team honors from Camp.In addition, nine Gophers were honored on the 1903 All-Western college football team: quarterback Sigmund Harris (BM-1, CIO-2, CRH, FL-1, MJ-2, WC); halfbacks James B. Irsfield (BMA, CIO-2, CT, FL-1, MJ-2, WC) and Otto Nelson Davies (BM-2); fullback Earl Current (BM-2); end Edward L. Rogers (BMA, BM-1, CIO-2, FL-1, MJ-1, WC); tackle Fred Schacht (BMA, BM-1, CIO-1, CRH, CT, FL-1, MJ-1, WC); guards Walton Willard Thorp (BM-1, CIO-2, CT, MJ-1) and John B. Warren (BM-2, MJ-2); and center Moses Strathern (BMA, BM-1, CIO-1, CRH, FL-1, MJ-1, WC).

1904 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1904 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1904 Western Conference football season. In their fifth year under head coach Henry L. Williams, the Golden Gophers compiled a 13–0 record (3–0 against Western Conference opponents). The 1904 Minnesota team has been recognized as a college football national champion by the Billingsley Report.The 146 point victory over Grinnell represents both the largest point total and the largest margin of victory in Gopher football history.Ten Minnesota players were recognized on the 1904 All-Western college football team: quarterback Sigmund Harris (COL-2, CT-2, MJ-1); halfbacks Otto Nelson Davies (COL-1, CT-2, MJ-1) and James Edward Kremer (COL-2); fullback Earl Current (CT-2, MJ-1); end Bobby Marshall (COL-2, MJ-1); tackles Percy Porter Brush (CRH, CT-2, MJ-2) and George Leland Case (MJ-2); guards Walton W. Thorpe (COL-1, CRH, CT-1, DFP, DT, MJ-1, SLR, WC) and Daniel D. Smith, Minnesota (CT-2); and center Moses Strathern (MJ-1).Two players also received recognition on the 1904 College Football All-America Team. Quarterback Sigmund Harris received third-team honors from Walter Camp, and guard Walton Thorp received first-team honors from Illinois coach Fred Lowenthal and third-team honors from Walter Camp.

1906 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1906 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1906 college football season. In their sixth year under head coach Henry L. Williams, the Golden Gophers compiled a 4–1 record (2–0 against Western Conference opponents) and outscored all opponents 47 to 29.

1909 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1909 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1909 college football season. In their tenth year under head coach Henry L. Williams, the Golden Gophers compiled a 6–1 record (3–0 against Western Conference opponents), won the conference championship, and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 158 to 27.

1910 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1910 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1910 college football season. In their 11th year under head coach Henry L. Williams, the Golden Gophers compiled a 6–1 record (2–0 against Western Conference opponents), won the conference championship, shut out their first six opponents, and outscored all opponents by a combined total of 179 to 6. The team lost only one game, falling to Michigan, 6–0, in the final game of the season.Tackle James Walker was named an All-American by Walter Camp. Fullback Lisle Johnston, quarterback John McGovern, halfback Reuben Rosenwald and tackle James Walker were named All-Big Ten first team.

1911 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1911 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1911 college football season. In their 12th year under head coach Henry L. Williams, the Golden Gophers compiled a 6–0–1 record (2–0–1 against Western Conference opponents), won the conference championship for the third consecutive year, and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 102 to 15. The team has been recognized retroactively as the national champion by the Billingsley Report.Center Clifford Morrell and halfback Reuben Rosenwald were named All-Big Ten first team.

1915 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1915 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1915 college football season. In their 16th year under head coach Henry L. Williams, the Golden Gophers compiled a 6–0–1 record (3–0–1 against Western Conference opponents), tied for the conference championship, and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 191 to 35. The only setback was a tie with Illinois with whom the Gophers shared the conference championship. The team was retroactively selected as the national champion for 1915 by the Billingsley Report.End Bert Baston, fullback Bernie Bierman and guard Merton Dunningan were named All-Americans by the Associated Press. Baston was also named an All-American by the Walter Camp Football Foundation and Look Magazine. Baston, Bierman and Dunnigan were named All-Big Ten first team.

1927 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1927 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1927 Big Ten Conference football season. In their third year under head coach Clarence Spears, the Golden Gophers compiled a 6–0–2 record and outscored their opponents by a combined score of 209 to 51. The Gophers shared the Big Ten title, the ninth in school history.

Fullback Herb Joesting and guard Harold Hanson were named All-American status by the Associated Press. Joesting, Hanson, quarterback Harold "Shorty" Almquist, tackle Mike Gary and end Ken Haycraft were named All-Big Ten first team.Total attendance for the season was 166,848, which averaged to 23,126. The season high for attendance was against Wisconsin.

1933 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1933 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1933 Big Ten Conference football season. In their second year under head coach Bernie Bierman, the Golden Gophers compiled a 4–0–4 record and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 64 to 32.Halfback Pug Lund was selected for the team's Most Valuable Player award. Tackle Marshall Wells was named All-Big Ten first team. Fullback John Baumgartner was named Academic All-Big Ten.Total attendance for the season was 164,301, which averaged to 27,384. The season high for attendance at Memorial Stadium was 45,000 against Iowa.

1934 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1934 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1934 college football season. In their third year under head coach Bernie Bierman, the Golden Gophers compiled an undefeated 8–0 record, shut out four opponents, and outscored all opponents by a combined total of 270 to 38.The team was named national champion by eight NCAA-designated major selectors in Billingsley, Boand, Dickinson, College Football Researchers Association, Helms, Litkenhous, National Championship Foundation, and Sagarin), with Alabama also receiving recognition.

Halfback Pug Lund was selected for the team's Most Valuable Player award for the second consecutive year. Lund also received Chicago Tribune Silver Football, awarded to the most valuable player of the Big Ten, and was named an All-American by the AP, Collier's Weekly/Grantland Rice, Liberty, Walter Camp Football Foundation and Look Magazine.End Frank Larson was named an All-American by the Associated Press (AP), Collier's Weekly/Grantland Rice and Look Magazine. Guard Bill Bevan was named an All-American by Collier's Weekly/Grantland Rice, Liberty and Look Magazine. End Bob Tenner was named an All-American by the United Press International. Tackle Phil Bengston, Bevan, Larson, Lund, Tenner, and tackle Ed Widseth were named All-Big Ten.Total attendance for the season was 192,922, which averaged to 38,584. The season high for attendance was against rival Michigan.

1935 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1935 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1935 college football season. In their fourth year under head coach Bernie Bierman, the Golden Gophers compiled an undefeated 8–0 record and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 194 to 36.The team was named national champion by seven NCAA-designated major selectors in Billingsley, Boand, College Football Researchers Association, Helms, Litkenhous, National Championship Foundation, and Poling.

1937 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1937 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1937 Big Ten Conference football season. In their sixth year under head coach Bernie Bierman, the Golden Gophers compiled a 6–2 record and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 184 to 50.End Ray King was named an All-American by the Walter Camp Football Foundation and Look magazine. Fullback Andy Uram was named an All-American by the Associated Press. King, halfback Rudy Gmitro, tackle Lou Midler and guard Frank Twedell were named All-Big Ten first team.Rudy Gmitro was awarded the Team MVP Award.Total attendance for the season was 254,188, which averaged to 50,838. The season high for attendance was against Notre Dame.

1938 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1938 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1938 Big Ten Conference football season. In their seventh year under head coach Bernie Bierman, the Golden Gophers compiled a 6–2 record and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 97 to 38.Guard Frank Twedell was named an All-American by the Associated Press and United Press. Twedell and quarterback Wilbur Moore were named All-Big Ten first team.Fullback Larry Buhler was awarded the Team MVP Award.Total attendance for the season was 237,000, which averaged to 47,400. The season high for attendance was against Michigan.

1940 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1940 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1940 Big Ten Conference football season. In their ninth year under head coach Bernie Bierman, the Golden Gophers compiled an undefeated 8–0 record and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 154 to 71.The team was selected national champion by ten NCAA-designated major selectors in Associated Press, Berryman, Boand, DeVold, Dickinson, Football Research, Houlgate, Litkenhous, National Championship Foundation, Sagarin, Sagarin (ELO-Chess) The team did not play in a bowl game.

Tackle Urban Odson was named an All-American by Liberty. Halfback George Franck was named an All-American by the Walter Camp Football Foundation, Associated Press, United Press International, Look Magazine and Collier's. Franck placed third in voting for the Heisman Trophy. Franck and Odson were also named All-Big Ten first team.Quarterback Bob Paffrath received the Team MVP Award.Total attendance for the season was 234,990, which averaged to 46,998. The season high for attendance was against Michigan.

1941 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1941 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1941 Big Ten Conference football season. In their tenth year under head coach Bernie Bierman, the Golden Gophers compiled an undefeated 8–0 record and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 186 to 38.The team was selected national champion by eleven NCAA-designated major selectors in Associated Press, Billingsley, Boand, DeVold, Dunkel, Football Research, Helms, Litkenhous, National Championship Foundation, Poling, Sagarin, Sagarin (ELO-Chess).Halfback Bruce Smith was named an All-American by the Walter Camp Football Foundation, INS, Time-Life, United Press (UP), Associated Press (AP) and Look Magazine. Smith was also awarded the Heisman Trophy, the only Golden Gopher to win the award.Tackle Dick Wildung was named an All-American by the Walter Camp Football Foundation, INS, Time Life, AP and UPI. Wildung, Smith, halfback Bill Daley, end Bob Fitch and guard Len Levy were named All-Big Ten.Back Bob Sweiger was awarded the Team MVP Award.Total attendance for the season was 239,227, which averaged to 47,845. The season high for attendance was against Northwestern.

1960 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1960 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1960 Big Ten Conference football season. In their seventh year under head coach Murray Warmath, the Golden Gophers compiled an 8–2 record and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 228 to 88.The team was selected national champion by four NCAA-designated major selectors in Associated Press, Football News, National Football Foundation, and UPI/coaches with some selections made prior to the Gophers' loss to Washington in the 1961 Rose Bowl. Both Minnesota and Ole Miss were consensus national champions.Guard Tom Brown received the team's Most Valuable Player award. Brown was also a consensus first-team All-American, won the Outland Trophy, finished second in the Heisman Trophy voting, and received the Chicago Tribune Silver Football, given to the Big Ten most valuable player. Brown, end Tom Hall and center Greg Larson were named All-Big Ten first team. Tackle Frank Brixius was named an Academic All-American and Academic All-Big Ten.Total attendance at five home games was 334,954, an average of 55,825 per game. The largest crowd was against Illinois.

1967 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1967 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1967 Big Ten Conference football season. In their 14th year under head coach Murray Warmath, the Golden Gophers compiled an 8–2 record and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 163 to 106. The Gophers shared the Big Ten title, the most recent conference title for the University of Minnesota football team.

Back Tom Sakal received the team's Most Valuable Player award. End Bob Stein was named an All-American by the Walter Camp Football Foundation, Associated Press, United Press International and Football Writers Association of America. Tackle John Williams, end Bob Stein, tackle McKinley Boston and back Tom Sakal were named All-Big Ten first team. Tight end Charles Sanders and offensive guard Ed Duren were named All-Big Ten second team. Offensive lineman Ezell Jones, defensive lineman Ron Kamzelski, defensive lineman Dave Nixon and defensive lineman Bob Stein were named Academic All-Big Ten.Total attendance at six home games was 287,798, an average of 47,966 per game. The largest crowd was against Michigan State.

Minnesota Golden Gophers football

The Minnesota Golden Gophers football program represents the University of Minnesota in college football at the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) level. Founded in 1882, the program is one of the oldest in college football. Minnesota has been a member of the Big Ten Conference since its inception in 1896 as the Western Conference. The Golden Gophers claim seven national championships: 1904, 1934, 1935, 1936, 1940, 1941, and 1960. Since 2009, the Gophers have played all their home games at TCF Bank Stadium in Minneapolis, Minnesota. In January 2017, the Gophers fired head coach Tracy Claeys and hired former Western Michigan head coach P. J. Fleck as the new head coach.

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