Ministry of Human Resource Development

The Ministry of Human Resource Development, formerly Ministry of Education (until 25 September 1985), is responsible for the development of human resources in India. The Ministry is divided into two departments: the Department of School Education and Literacy, which deals with primary, secondary and higher secondary education, adult education and literacy, and the Department of Higher Education, which deals with university education, technical education, scholarship etc. The erstwhile Ministry of Education now functions under these two departments, as of 26 September 1985.

The Ministry is headed by the cabinet-ranked Minister of Human Resources Development, a member of the Council of Ministers. The current HRD minister is Prakash Javadekar.[1]

Ministry of Human Resource Development
Logo of the Ministry of Human Resource Development
Ministry overview
JurisdictionIndia Republic of India
HeadquartersShastri Bhawan,
Dr. Rajendra Prasad Road,
New Delhi
Minister responsible
Deputy Minister responsible
Child agencies
Websitemhrd.gov.in

Department of School Education and Literacy

The Department of School Education and Literacy is responsible for development of school education and literacy in the country. It works on "universalisation of education" and for the cultivation of higher standards for citizenship among the youth of India.

Department of Higher Education

The Department of Higher Education is in charge of secondary and post-secondary education. The department is empowered to grant deemed university status to educational institutions on the advice of the University Grants Commission (UGC) of India, under Section 3 of the University Grants Commission (UGC) Act, 1956.[2][3][4] The Department of Higher Education takes care of one of the largest higher education systems of the world, just after the United States and China. The department is engaged in bringing world-class opportunities of higher education and research to the country so that Indian students are not found lacking when facing an international platform. For this, the government has launched joint ventures and signed MoUs to help the Indian student benefit from the world opinion. The technical education system in the country can be broadly classified into three categories – Central Government funded institutions, State Government/State-funded institutions & Self-financed institutions. The 122 Centrally funded institution of technical and science education are as under: List of CFTIs (Centrally Funded Technical Institutions): IIITs (4 – Allahabad, Gwalior, Jabalpur, Kancheepuram), IITs (16), IIMs (13), IISc, IISER (5), NITs (30), NITTTRs (4), and 9 others (SPA, ISMU, NERIST, SLIET, IIEST, NITIE & NIFFT, CIT)[5]

Organisational structure

The department is divided into eight bureaus, and most of the work of the department is handled through over 100 autonomous organisations under these bureaus.[6]

Others:

Objectives

The main objectives of the Ministry are:

  • Formulating the National Policy on Education and to ensure that it is implemented in letter and spirit
  • Planned development, including expanding access and improving quality of the educational institutions throughout the country, including in regions where people do not have easy access to education.
  • Paying special attention to disadvantaged groups like the poor, females and the minorities
  • Provide financial help in the form of scholarships, loan subsidy, etc. to deserving students from deprived sections of the society.
  • Encouraging international cooperation in the field of education, including working closely with the UNESCO and foreign governments as well as Universities, to enhance the educational opportunities in the country.

National Institutional Ranking Framework

In April 2016, Ministry of Human Resource Development published the first list of rankings of Indian colleges under National Institutional Ranking Framework.[11][12][13] The entire ranking exercise involved NBA, All India Council for Technical Education, UGC, Thomson Reuters, Elsevier and INFLIBNET (Information & Library Network) centre.[14][15] The ranking framework was launched in September 2015.[16] All 122 centrally-funded institutions – including all central universities, IITs and IIMs – participated in the first round of ranking.[17][18]

References

  1. ^ Cabinet reshuffle on 05 July 2016
  2. ^ "UGC Act-1956" (PDF). mhrd.gov.in/. Secretary, University Grants Commission. Retrieved 1 February 2016.
  3. ^ "Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology (IISST) Thiruvanathapuram Declared as Deemed to be University". Ministry of Human Resource Development (India), Press Information Bureau. 14 July 2008.
  4. ^ "IIST gets deemed university status". The Hindu. 15 July 2008.
  5. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 1 July 2014. Retrieved 5 May 2014..
  6. ^ ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE Archived 29 September 2010 at the Wayback Machine. Department of Higher Education.
  7. ^ Technical Education Overview Archived 5 October 2011 at the Wayback Machine. Dept of Ed.
  8. ^ National Level Councils Archived 1 February 2010 at the Wayback Machine. Tech Ed.
  9. ^ Council of Architecture website. Coa.gov.in (1 September 1972). Retrieved on 14 April 2012.
  10. ^ "Technical Education – Government of India, Ministry of Human Resource Development".
  11. ^ "National Institutional Ranking Framework 2016". MHRD. 2016. Retrieved 6 August 2016.
  12. ^ "HRD Ministry announces universities ranking, IIT Madras and IIM Bangalore top the list".
  13. ^ Special Correspondent. "University ranking: At least four TN-run universities in the list". The Hindu.
  14. ^ "JNU, Hyderabad univ among top 10 varsities: Survey".
  15. ^ Samarth Bansal. "Claims of institutions not cross-checked". The Hindu.
  16. ^ "IISc ranked India's best university; IIM-B tops B-School list".
  17. ^ "Is your institute one of India's best? Check out the best ranked universities in India!".
  18. ^ "IIMB ranked No 1 in the India Rankings 2016 in the Management Education category - Indian Institute of Management Bangalore".

External links

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