Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government

The Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government (MHCLG)[2] is the UK Government department for housing, communities and local government in England. It was established in May 2006 and is the successor to the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister, established in 2001. Its headquarters is located at 2 Marsham Street in London, occupation of which it shares with the Home Office. It was renamed to add Housing to its title and changed to a ministry in January 2018.

There are corresponding departments in the Scottish Government, the Welsh Government and the Northern Ireland Executive, responsible for communities and local government in their respective jurisdictions.

Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
MHCLG logo
Marsham Street
Department overview
FormedMay 2006
JurisdictionEngland
Headquarters2 Marsham Street, London, England
Annual budget£28.1 billion (current) & £3.5 billion (capital) for 2011-12 [1]
Minister responsible
Department executive
Websitewww.gov.uk/dclg

Ministers

The MHCLG's ministers are as follows:[3]

Minister Rank Portfolio
The Rt Hon. James Brokenshire MP Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government
Overall leadership of the Ministry, Troubled Families
Kit Malthouse MP Minister of State for Housing and Planning
Housing, Ebbsfleet, planning policy, neighbourhood planning, lead minister on the Housing Bill, planning casework, London
Jake Berry MP Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for the Northern Powerhouse and Local Growth Northern Powerhouse, city deals, European Regional Development Fund, Enterprise Zones and Local Enterprise Partnerships, building regulations, supporting minister on the Devolution Bill, planning casework
Rishi Sunak MP Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Local Government Local Government policy and finances, adult social care, local government pensions and interventions policy, troubled families, parks/green space
Heather Wheeler MP Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Housing and Homelessness Homelessness and rough sleeping, private-rented sector, Housing Ombudsman and redress, leasehold reform,voluntary right-to-buy, home buying process reform, domestic abuse and refuges, supported housing,
The Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State Departmental business in the House of Lords, local government finance and policy, integration and faith, High Speed Rail 2 (HS2), Travellers, supporting the Secretary of State on City Deals and Troubled Families, women and equalities (supporting the Department for Education in the House of Lords)

The Permanent Secretary is Melanie Dawes who took up her post on 1 March 2015.[4]

Henry Smith was appointed Parliamentary Private Secretary to the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government on 26 May 2015.[5]

History and responsibilities

MHCLG was formed in July 2001 as part of the Cabinet Office with the title Office of the Deputy Prime Minister (ODPM), headed by the then Deputy Prime Minister, John Prescott. In May 2002 the ODPM became a separate department after absorbing the local government and regions portfolios from the defunct Department for Transport, Local Government and the Regions. The ODPM was criticised in some quarters for adding little value and the Environmental Audit Committee had reported negatively on the department in the past.[6][7] During the 5 May 2006 reshuffle of Tony Blair's government, it was renamed and Ruth Kelly succeeded David Miliband to become the first Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government at the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG). In January 2018, as part of Theresa May’s Cabinet Reshuffle, the department was renamed the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government (MHCLG).

Responsibilities

The Ministry is responsible for UK Government policy in the following areas, mainly in England:[8]

On its creation it also assumed the community policy function of the Home Office. Ministers have since established the Commission on Integration and Cohesion, and the now separate Government Equalities Office which is now part of the Department for Education.

Bodies sponsored by MHCLG

Executive agencies

The department also was previously responsible for two other agencies. On 18 July 2011 Ordnance Survey was transferred to the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills[9] and on 28 February 2013 the Fire Service College was sold to Capita.[10]

Non-departmental public bodies

In January 2007, Ruth Kelly announced proposals to bring together the delivery functions of the Housing Corporation, English Partnerships and parts of the Department for Housing, Communities and Local Government to form a new unified housing and regeneration agency, the Homes and Communities Agency (renamed Homes England in 2018). Initially announced as Communities England, it became operational in December 2008. This also includes the Academy for Sustainable Communities. 2008 was also the year that the department along with the Local Government Association produced the National Improvement and Efficiency Strategy [11] which led to the creation of nine Regional Improvement and Efficiency Partnerships (RIEPs) with devolved funding of £185m to drive sector-led improvement for councils.

Devolution

Its main counterparts in the devolved nations of the UK are as follows.

Scotland

Northern Ireland

Wales

  • Welsh Government Department for Local Government and Public Services

See also

References

  1. ^ Budget 2011 (PDF). London: HM Treasury. 2011. p. 48. Archived from the original (PDF) on 4 April 2011. Retrieved 27 August 2014.
  2. ^ Hansard 22 January 2018 column 19
  3. ^ "Our ministers". GOV.UK. Department for Communities and Local Government. Retrieved 12 May 2015.
  4. ^ "Melanie Dawes announced as new DCLG permanent secretary – Civil Service World". www.civilserviceworld.com.
  5. ^ [1]
  6. ^ "Environmental report slams ODPM over sustainable code". Building.(subscription required)
  7. ^ Knight, Sam (5 May 2006). "Prescott loses his dream home the megadepartment". The Times. London.
  8. ^ "Government ministers and responsibilities – GOV.UK".
  9. ^ "Ordnance Survey becomes part of Department for Business Innovation and Skills". Archived from the original on 20 January 2012. Retrieved 9 September 2011.
  10. ^ "Fire Service College sold to Capita". 28 February 2013 – via www.bbc.co.uk.
  11. ^ National Improvement and Efficiency Strategy Archived 27 January 2008 at the Wayback Machine

External links

2018 British cabinet reshuffle

Theresa May carried out the first "refresh" of her minority government in January 2018. Following the resignation of Damian Green as First Secretary of State in December 2017, the reshuffle had been highly anticipated and briefed in the press. There were reports of "up to a quarter" of her cabinet ministers who might lose their positions, including Boris Johnson, who had been seen to cause a number of political gaffes during his term as Foreign Secretary. The reshuffle was seen as an opportunity for the Prime Minister to reassert her authority, greatly diminished following the result of the snap general election in the previous summer. Despite being described by 10 Downing Street as a chance to "refresh" the Cabinet, few changes were made to the ministerial line-up. On 9 January, newspaper headlines reflected the chaotic nature of May's reshuffle, with The Daily Telegraph describing it as, "The Night of the Blunt Stiletto", a reference to the 1962 reshuffle carried out by Harold Macmillan.

It was widely reported that Jeremy Hunt was due to be moved from the Department for Health to become Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, but refused. Instead he defended his position as Health Secretary and convinced May to allow him to remain in post, and for "Social Care" to be added to the name of his department. After considerable speculation that Justine Greening would lose her job as Education Secretary, she refused the offer of Secretary of State for Work and Pensions and chose instead to resign from the government.

Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole

Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole is a unitary local government district in England. It was created on 1 April 2019 from the areas that were previously administered by the unitary authorities of Bournemouth and Poole, and the non-metropolitan district of Christchurch.

Dominic Raab

Dominic Rennie Raab (born 25 February 1974) is a British politician who served as Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union from 9 July to 15 November 2018. A member of the Conservative Party, he has been the Member of Parliament (MP) for Esher and Walton since 2010.

Raab was appointed Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State at the Ministry of Justice on 12 May 2015. When Theresa May appointed her first government a year later, he returned to the backbenches. Following the 2017 general election, he was appointed Minister of State for Courts and Justice. When the government was reshuffled in January 2018, Raab moved to the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government.In July 2018, May appointed him Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union following the resignation of David Davis. Raab resigned as Brexit Secretary on 15 November 2018, in opposition to the Draft Withdrawal Agreement which he had been involved in negotiating with the EU.

Dorset Council (UK)

Dorset Council is the local authority for the Dorset unitary authority, England. It was created on 1 April 2019 to administer most of the area formerly administered by Dorset County Council, which was previously subdivided into the districts of Weymouth and Portland, West Dorset, North Dorset, Purbeck, and East Dorset.

East Suffolk (district)

East Suffolk is a local government district in Suffolk, England, which was established on 1 April 2019, following the merger of the existing Suffolk Coastal and Waveney districts. At the 2011 census, the two districts had a combined population of 239,552.

The main towns in the new district include Aldeburgh, Beccles, Bungay, Felixstowe, Framlingham, Halesworth, Leiston, Lowestoft, Saxmundham and Southwold as well parts of the wider Ipswich built-up area including Kesgrave, Martlesham and Woodbridge.

The district covers a smaller area compared to the former administrative county of East Suffolk, which was abolished by the Local Government Act 1972.

Eddie Hughes (British politician)

Edmund Francis Hughes (born 3 October 1968) is an English Conservative Party politician. He has been the Member of Parliament (MP) for Walsall North since the general election on 8 June 2017, where he unexpectedly unseated the sitting veteran Labour Party MP David Winnick. Winnick, 83 at the time, had held the seat for the previous 38 years.

Heather Wheeler

Heather Kay Wheeler (born 14 May 1959) is a British Conservative Party politician, who was first elected at the 2010 general election as the Member of Parliament (MP) for South Derbyshire, taking the seat from the Labour Party after 13 years. She currently serves as Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State at the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government.

Housing, Communities and Local Government Committee

The Housing, Communities and Local Government Select Committee is a select committee of the House of Commons in the Parliament of the United Kingdom. The remit of the Committee is to examine the work, the expenditure, administration and policies of the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government (MHCLG) and its associated public bodies.

Kit Malthouse

Christopher Laurie Malthouse (born 27 October 1966) is a British Conservative Party politician, businessman and occasional writer. He was elected in the May 2015 general election as the Member of Parliament (MP) for North West Hampshire. He was previously the Deputy Mayor of London for Business and Enterprise, and a member of the London Assembly representing the West Central constituency, which encompasses the City of Westminster, the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham and the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea.

He was formerly Chair of the Metropolitan Police Authority and the first Statutory Deputy Mayor for Policing, and a former city councillor and Deputy Leader of Westminster City Council, London. Following the 2018 Cabinet reshuffle, Malthouse was appointed Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State at the Department for Work and Pensions. In July 2018, he was appointed Minister of State for Housing, at the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government. Malthouse was credited as the convener of an agreement between limited factions of the Conservative party on Brexit, The Malthouse Compromise in January 2019. The Malthouse Compromise was later voted down in Parliament in March 2019.

Ministry of Housing and Local Government

The Ministry of Housing and Local Government was a United Kingdom government department formed after the Second World War, covering the areas of housing and local government.

It was formed, as the Ministry of Local Government and Planning, in January 1951 when functions of the Ministry of Health, which had taken over the powers of the old Local Government Board, were merged with the Ministry of Town and Country Planning, which had been created in 1943. Its name was changed to the Ministry of Housing and Local Government by the Conservatives after the October 1951 general election.It was merged in 1970 with the Ministry of Transport to form the Department for the Environment.

The ministry was headed by the Minister of Housing and Local Government.

The name was partially (and arguably deliberately) revived by Theresa May on 9 January 2018, when the Department for Communities and Local Government was renamed as the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government, with a similar name change applying to its Secretary of State.

National Homelessness Advice Service

The National Homelessness Advice Service (NHAS) is an advice, training and support service in the United Kingdom. It advises on housing and homelessness and is used by local authorities, local citizen's advice and other agencies who give advice to the public on housing/homelessness to seek advice on queries. The NHAS is funded by the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government and provided by Shelter.

National Planning Policy Framework

The National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) was originally published by the UK's Department of Communities and Local Government in March 2012, consolidating over two dozen previously issued documents called Planning Policy Statements (PPS) and Planning Policy Guidance Notes (PPG) for use in England. A revised NPPF was published by the UK Government's Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government on 24 July 2018. This is the first revision of the National Planning Policy Framework since 2012. It implements around 85 reforms announced previously through the Housing White Paper, the planning for the right homes in the right places consultation and the draft revised National Planning Policy Framework consultation. The revised NPPF has since been updated on 19 February 2019 following a technical consultation to redefine deliverable housing.

Planning Inspectorate

The Planning Inspectorate for England and Wales (sometimes referred to as PINS) (Welsh: Yr Arolygiaeth Gynllunio) is an executive agency of the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government of the United Kingdom Government with responsibility to make decisions and provide recommendations and advice on a range of land use planning-related issues across England and Wales. The Planning Inspectorate deals with planning appeals, nationally significant infrastructure projects, planning permission, examinations of Local Plans and other planning-related and specialist casework.

Regulator of Social Housing

The Regulator of Social Housing regulates registered providers of social housing. This function was transferred from the Homes and Communities Agency in October 2018. Until April 2012 it was performed by the Tenant Services Authority. It is sponsored by the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government.

It maintains a list of registered social housing providers.

It has challenged the business model of some providers where rent income from housing benefit payments is less than lease expenditure.See also Scottish Housing Regulator

Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government

The Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, or informally Communities Secretary is a Cabinet position heading the UK's Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government, previously known as the Department for Communities and Local Government from 2006 to 2018.This department was created in 2006 by then British prime minister Tony Blair to replace the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister.

The Secretary of State took over the responsibilities of the Minister of State for Communities and Local Government. This post, within the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister, was created in 2005, on the transfer of several of the functions of the then Deputy Prime Minister, John Prescott.

Somerset West and Taunton

Somerset West and Taunton is a local government district in Somerset, England. It was established on 1 April 2019 by the Somerset West and Taunton (Local Government Changes) Order 2018. The council replaced the Taunton Deane and West Somerset councils, which governed the same area from 1974.

Suffolk Coastal

Suffolk Coastal was a local government district in Suffolk, England. Its council is based in Melton, having moved from neighbouring Woodbridge in 2017. Other towns include Felixstowe, Framlingham, Leiston, Aldeburgh, and Saxmundham.

The district was formed on 1 April 1974, under the Local Government Act 1972, as a merger of the municipal borough of Aldeburgh, along with Felixstowe, Leiston-cum-Sizewell, Saxmundham and Woodbridge urban districts, and Blyth Rural District and Deben Rural District. The population of the district was 124,298 at the 2011 Census.Suffolk Coastal district was merged with Waveney district on 1 April 2019 to form the new East Suffolk district.

Valuation Office Agency

The Valuation Office Agency is a government body in England and Wales. It is an executive agency of Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs.

The Agency values properties for the purpose of Council Tax and for non-domestic rates in England and Wales (in Scotland this function is performed by the Scottish Assessors). This work is undertaken on behalf of the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government in England, and the Welsh Assembly Government in Wales.

The Agency also provides additional valuation services to HM Revenue and Customs through its District Valuer Services business stream. This includes property valuations for the purpose of assessing taxes, such as capital gains and inheritance tax. District Valuer Services also provide a wide range of valuation services to the public sector, such as asset valuations for resource accounting and compulsory purchase advice on the purchase and sale of property, specialist building surveying advice, and valuation of mineral bearing property, landfill sites and plant and machinery.

Since April 2008 following a restructure, District Valuer Services has been divided into National and Central Services, who look after the Agency's statutory services to HMRC, and Commercial Services who provide commercial property valuation services to the public sector.

The predecessors of the Valuation Office Agency were the separate Valuation Office organisations in England and Wales (established in 1910) and in Scotland (established in 1911). The Valuation Office Agency was created as a merger of these two and became a Next Steps Agency of the Inland Revenue on 30 September 1991.

The VOA employs 3,990 people (full-time equivalent) in 86 offices.

It is the largest single employer of Chartered

Surveyors in the UK. The current Chief Executive is Melissa Tatton, appointed in September 2017.

The equivalent body to the VOA for Northern Ireland is the Valuation and Lands Agency. In Scotland it is the Scottish Assessors.

West Suffolk (district)

West Suffolk is a local government district in Suffolk, England, which was established on 1 April 2019, following the merger of the existing Forest Heath district with the borough of St Edmundsbury. The two councils had already had a joint Chief Executive since 2011. At the 2011 census, the two districts had a combined population of 170,756.

The main towns in the new district are Bury St Edmunds, Newmarket, Brandon, Haverhill and Mildenhall.

The district covers a smaller area compared to the former administrative county of West Suffolk, which was abolished by the Local Government Act 1972.

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